7

Let's say I have a sequence of ints like this:

val mySeq = Seq(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)

I want to split this by let's say 0 as a delimiter to look like this:

val mySplitSeq = Seq(Seq(0, 1, 2, 1), Seq(0, -1), Seq(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

What is the most elegant way to do this in Scala?

2

This works alright

mySeq.foldLeft(Vector.empty[Vector[Int]]) {
  case (acc, i) if acc.isEmpty => Vector(Vector(i))
  case (acc, 0) => acc :+ Vector(0)
  case (acc, i) => acc.init :+ (acc.last :+ i)
}

where 0 (or whatever) is your delimiter.

  • I guess I should mention that you're not appending anything to a list here. – Lasf Oct 24 '18 at 20:42
  • It's roughly O(n * log(n)) for an obviously linear algorithm... Appending to Vector doesn't make it O(n^2), but it's not constant time either. – Andrey Tyukin Oct 24 '18 at 21:28
  • 1
    No, wait, what? It takes acc.init every time it appends an element to a sublist? Then it's not even O(n*log(n)), but rather sth. like O(n^2*log(n)^2). That's not linear. – Andrey Tyukin Oct 24 '18 at 21:37
  • Hmm I had assumed acc.init was constant time – Lasf Oct 24 '18 at 22:31
  • 1
    Ha I literally had that article open in another tab. I'm with you that it's not exactly O(n) but I think we're likely a lot better than O(n^2*log(n)^2). – Lasf Oct 24 '18 at 22:52
3

Efficient O(n) solution

Tail-recursive solution that never appends anything to lists:

def splitBy[A](sep: A, seq: List[A]): List[List[A]] = {
  @annotation.tailrec
  def rec(xs: List[A], revAcc: List[List[A]]): List[List[A]] = xs match {
    case Nil => revAcc.reverse
    case h :: t => 
      if (h == sep) {
        val (pref, suff) = xs.tail.span(_ != sep)
        rec(suff, (h :: pref) :: revAcc)
      } else {
        val (pref, suff) = xs.span(_ != sep)
        rec(suff, pref :: revAcc)
      }
  }
  rec(seq, Nil)
}

val mySeq = List(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
println(splitBy(0, mySeq))

produces:

List(List(0, 1, 2, 1), List(0, -1), List(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

It also handles the case where the input does not start with the separator.


For fun: Another O(n) solution that works for small integers

This is more of warning rather than a solution. Trying to reuse String's split does not result in anything sane:

val mySeq = Seq(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
val z = mySeq.min
val res = (mySeq
  .map(x => (x - z).toChar)
  .mkString
  .split((-z).toChar)
  .map(s => 0 :: s.toList.map(_.toInt + z)
).toList.tail)

It will fail if the integers span a range larger than 65535, and it looks pretty insane. Nevertheless, I find it amusing that it works at all:

res: List[List[Int]] = List(List(0, 1, 2, 1), List(0, -1), List(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))
1

You can use foldLeft:

val delimiter = 0

val res = mySeq.foldLeft(Seq[Seq[Int]]()) {
  case (acc, `delimiter`) => acc :+ Seq(delimiter)
  case (acc, v) => acc.init :+ (acc.last :+ v)
}

NOTE: This assumes input necessarily starts with delimiter.

  • 1
    That's a lot of appends with :+ to an immutable Sequence (which will probably be List)? – Andrey Tyukin Oct 24 '18 at 19:48
  • will not case (acc, v) => acc :+ Seq(v) work? – stack0114106 Oct 25 '18 at 1:47
0

One more variant using indices and reverse slicing

scala> val s = Seq(0,1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
s: scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int] = ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)

scala> s.indices.filter( s(_)==0).+:(if(s(0)!=0) -1 else -2).filter(_>= -1 ).reverse.map( {var p=0; x=>{ val y=s.slice(x,s.size-p);p=s.size-x;y}}).reverse
res173: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int]] = Vector(ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1), ArrayBuffer(0, -1), ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

if the starting doesn't have the delimiter, then also it works.. thanks to jrook

scala>  val s = Seq(1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
s: scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int] = ArrayBuffer(1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)

scala> s.indices.filter( s(_)==0).+:(if(s(0)!=0) -1 else -2).filter(_>= -1 ).reverse.map( {var p=0; x=>{ val y=s.slice(x,s.size-p);p=s.size-x;y}}).reverse
res174: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int]] = Vector(ArrayBuffer(1, 2, 1), ArrayBuffer(0, -1), ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

UPDATE1:

More compact version by removing the "reverse" in above

scala> val s = Seq(0,1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
s: scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int] = ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)

scala> s.indices.filter( s(_)==0).+:(if(s(0)!=0) -1 else -2).filter(_>= -1 ).:+(s.size).sliding(2,1).map( x=>s.slice(x(0),x(1)) ).toList
res189: List[scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int]] = List(ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1), ArrayBuffer(0, -1), ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

scala> val s = Seq(1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
s: scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int] = ArrayBuffer(1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)

scala> s.indices.filter( s(_)==0).+:(if(s(0)!=0) -1 else -2).filter(_>= -1 ).:+(s.size).sliding(2,1).map( x=>s.slice(x(0),x(1)) ).toList
res190: List[scala.collection.mutable.Seq[Int]] = List(ArrayBuffer(1, 2, 1), ArrayBuffer(0, -1), ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

scala>
  • This drops the first sequence if the list does not start with the delimiter – jrook Oct 24 '18 at 23:46
  • '@jrook.. yes.. let me fix that – stack0114106 Oct 25 '18 at 1:11
  • sliding(2,1) is equivalent to sliding(2) – jrook Oct 25 '18 at 3:28
0

Here is a solution I believe is both short and should run in O(n):

def seqSplitter[T](s: ArrayBuffer[T], delimiter : T) = 
  (0 +: s.indices.filter(s(_)==delimiter) :+ s.size)  //find split locations
  .sliding(2)
  .map(idx => s.slice(idx.head, idx.last)) //extract the slice
  .dropWhile(_.isEmpty) //take care of the first element
  .toList

The idea is to take all the indices where the delimiter occurs, slide over them and slice the sequence at those locations. dropWhile takes care of the first element being a delimiter or not.

Here I am putting all the data in an ArrayBuffer to ensure slicing will take O(size_of_slice).

val mySeq = ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1, 0, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 2)
seqSplitter(mySeq, 0).toList

Gives:

List(ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 1), ArrayBuffer(0, -1), ArrayBuffer(0, 1, 2, 3, 2))

A more detailed complexity analysis

The operations are:

  • Filter the delimiter indices (O(n))
  • loop over a list of indices obtained from previous step (O(num_of_delimeters)); for each pair of indices corresponding to a slice:
    • Copy the slice from the array and put it into the final collection (O(size_of_slice))

The last two steps sum up to O(n).

  • 1) Empty list at the start. 2) All 0s missing in the output. – Andrey Tyukin Oct 24 '18 at 20:08
  • 1
    The question provided the expected output: val mySplitSeq = Seq(Seq(0, 1, 2, 1), Seq(0, -1), Seq(0, 1, 2, 3, 2)), so there's no ambiguity there. The OP didn't specify what should happen if the input does not start with the delimiter - that was the only ambiguity that I see there. On performance: if the actual underlying immutable sequence is List, then each :+ would rebuild the entire list, which would result in O(n^2) runtime assuming that the subsequences remain "short" for N -> infty. That is a bit weird for a blatantly O(n) algorithm... – Andrey Tyukin Oct 24 '18 at 20:13
  • @AndreyTyukin, I rewrote my answer to address those issues. Thanks! – jrook Oct 24 '18 at 21:26

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