6
#include <stdio.h>
#define a (1,2,3)
#define b {1,2,3}

int main()
{
    unsigned int c = a;
    unsigned int d = b;
    printf("%d\n",c);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    return 0;
}

Above C code will print output as 3 and 1.

But how are #define a (1,2,3) and #define b {1,2,3} taking a=3 and b=1 without build warning, and also how () and {} are giving different values?

5
  • 1
    Well, what are your build options? Can't tell you why it builds without a peep otherwise. – StoryTeller - Unslander Monica Oct 25 '18 at 12:39
  • 1
    I get error: excess elements in scalar initializer [-Werror] for the d definition, as expected. – Quentin Oct 25 '18 at 12:49
  • @Quentin just got it, c does not create erro, c++ create error. – Afshin Oct 25 '18 at 12:55
  • @Afshin I got this error with clang -std=c11 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic-errors in C mode. – Quentin Oct 25 '18 at 12:56
  • @Quentin I tested it in godbolt.org right now. with source code as c and compiler as gcc 8.2 or clang 7.0.0, I didn't get error. – Afshin Oct 25 '18 at 12:58
8

Remember, pre-processor just replaces macros. So in your case you code will be converted to this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    unsigned int c = (1,2,3);
    unsigned int d = {1,2,3};
    printf("%d\n",c);
    printf("%d\n",d);
    return 0;
}

In first case, you get result from , operator, so c will be equal to 3. But in 2nd case you get first member of initializer list for d, so you will get 1 as result.

2nd lines creates error if you compile code as c++. But it seems that you can compile this code in c.

2
  • 1
    Strange that unsigned int d = {1,2,3}; compiles in C, even without warnings. – Jabberwocky Oct 25 '18 at 13:02
  • @Jabberwocky yea, I found it strange too. – Afshin Oct 25 '18 at 13:03
4

In addition to other answers,

unsigned int d = {1,2,3};

(after macro substitution)

is not valid in C. It violates 6.7.9 Initialization:

No initializer shall attempt to provide a value for an object not contained within the entity being initialized.

With stricter compilation options (gcc -std=c17 -Wall -Wextra -pedantic test.c), gcc produces:

warning: excess elements in scalar initializer
     unsigned int d = {1,2,3};
                         ^

However, note that

unsigned int d = {1};

is valid because initializing scalar with braces is allowed. Just the extra initializer values that's the problem with the former snippet.

1

For c, the initializer is an expression, and its value is 3. For d, the initializer is a list in braces, and it provides too many values, of which only the first is used.

After macro expansion, the definitions of c and d are:

unsigned int c = (1,2,3);
unsigned int d = {1,2,3};

In the C grammar, the initializer that appears after unsigned int c = or unsigned int d = may be either an assignment-expression or { initializer-list } (and may have a final comma in that list). (This comes from C 2018 6.7.9 1.)

In the first line, (1,2,3) is an assignment-expression. In particular, it is a primary-expression of the form ( expression ). In that, the expression uses the comma operator; it has the form expression , assignment-expression. I will omit the continued expansion of the grammar. Suffice it to say that 1,2,3 is an expression built with comma operators, and the value of the comma operator is simply its right-hand operand. So the value of 1,2 is 2, and the value of 1,2,3 is 3. And the value of the parentheses expression is the value of the expression inside it, so the value of (1,2,3) is 3. Therefore, c is initialized to 3.

In contrast, in the second line, {1,2,3} is { initializer-list }. According to the text in C clause 6.7.9, the initializer-list provides values used to initialize the object being defined. The {} form is provided to initialize arrays and structures, but it can be used to initialize scalar objects too. If we wrote unsigned int d = {1};, this would initialize d to 1.

However, 6.7.9 2 is a constraint that says “No initializer shall attempt to provide a value for an object not contained within the entity being initialized.” This means you may not provide more initial values than there are things to be initialized. Therefore, unsigned int d = {1,2,3}; violates the constraint. A compiler is required to produce a diagnostic message. Additionally, your compiler seems to have gone on and used only the first value in the list to initialize d. The others were superfluous and were ignored.

(Additionally, 6.7.9 11 says “The initializer for a scalar shall be a single expression, optionally enclosed in braces.”)

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