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This question already has an answer here:

I have a file(input.txt) with below content:

é

and I am running the below commands and failing to replace unicode character with character "a"

Attempt 1: Prints blank.

>>> file = open("input.txt","r")
>>> print file.read().replace(u"\u00E9","a")

Attempt 2: Prints blank.

>>> file = open("input.txt","r")
>>> print file.read().decode("utf-8").replace(u"\u00E9","a").encode("utf-8")

Note: I have gone through this question and the answer(Attempt 2) suggested there is not working, not sure why.

EDIT:

As pointed in the comments by ShadowRanger, My question was incomplete. My apologies for that.

Here is the complete code for Attempt 1:

>>> file = open("input.txt","r")
>>> print file.read()
>>> é
>>> print file.read().replace(u"\u00E9","a")
>>> 

Here is the complete code for Attempt 2:

>>> file = open("input.txt","r")
>>> print file.read()
>>> é
>>> print file.read().decode("utf-8").replace(u"\u00E9","a").encode("utf-8")
>>> 

marked as duplicate by ShadowRanger python Oct 26 '18 at 20:10

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This shouldn't output nothing unless the file contains nothing (or contains backspace/carriage return characters that undo the output as it goes). Try wrapping the whole shebang (aside from print itself) in repr(); that should guaranteed output, with escapes to prevent any terminal weirdness from messing you up, so you can confirm if there should be output. – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '18 at 15:25
  • @ShadowRanger I got it working. I changed file read mode to binary and then Attempt 2 worked. file = open("input.txt","rb") – javanoob Oct 26 '18 at 15:41
  • For Python 2 code, it shouldn't matter whether it's binary or text mode (unless you are using io.open without telling us), as there is no difference at all on most non-Windows machines, and on Windows, it only affects line endings, where the lack of line ending translation in binary mode would cause problems. Even if binary mode made a difference (e.g. you're using io.open and not telling us), it should raise an exception if it's a problem, not silently print nothing. You should really provide a minimal reproducible example, otherwise, we're just guessing at what else might be changing your behavior. – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '18 at 18:22
  • @ShadowRanger Thank you for your time and my apologies for incomplete question. Updated question now with full details. Thanks again! – javanoob Oct 26 '18 at 19:06
  • 1
    With the extra details, your problem was a clear duplicate of Why can't I call read() twice on an open file?. You can't call read() with no arguments twice in a row and expect to get the file contents twice; you either need to call it once and store the result for reuse, or call .seek(0) on the file object in between read calls to reset the file position. – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '18 at 20:11
2

You are opening the file in read-only mode. You won't be able to modify the contents of the file if that's what you are trying to achieve.

If you are just trying to manipulate the string read from the file, then I'd suggest you specify the file encoding in order to seamlessly manipulate unicode characters within your program.

Something like this:

PYTHON 2

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

from __future__ import unicode_literals
import io

with io.open("input.txt", mode="r", encoding="utf-8"):
    c = file.read()
    c = c.replace("é", "a")
    print c

PYTHON 3

import io

with io.open("input.txt", mode="r", encoding="utf-8") as file:
    c = file.read()
    c = c.replace("é", "a")
    print(c)
  • You'd need a u prefix on "é", and probably need a source code encoding declaration for this to work on Python 2 (along with using io.open instead of open, which you've done correctly). The OP is clearly on Python 2 based on the unparenthesized prints. – ShadowRanger Oct 26 '18 at 18:26
  • Good point @ShadowRanger, I missed the unparenthesized print statement. I'll update my answer accordingly. I kinda rushed into answering this one. – food4mybrain Oct 26 '18 at 18:40

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