1

I need to add single-sign-on using Windows Authentication to my intranet Angular web application (hosted on IIS) which uses a JWT Bearer token for authentication. The controllers are secured using the [Authorize] attribute and JWT Bearer token authentication is working. All of the controllers are exposed under the api/ route.

The idea is to publish a new SsoController under the sso/ route, which should be secured with Windows Authentication and that exposes a WindowsLogin action that returns a valid bearer token for the application.

Back when I was using ASP.net Web Forms it was quite easy, you only had to enable Windows Authentication in the web.config/system.webServer section, disable it application-wide in the system.web section and then enable it again under a <location path="sso"> tag. This way ASP.net generated the NTLM/Negotiate challenges only for requests under the sso route.

I got it almost working - the SsoController gets the Windows user name and creates the JWT token just fine, but the pipeline is still generating the WWW-Authenticate: NTLM and WWW-Authenticate: Negotiate headers for all HTTP 401 responses, not just for the ones under the sso route.

How can I tell the pipeline that I want only Anonymous or Bearer auth for all of the api/ requests?

Thanks in advance for your help.

Program.cs

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
  WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
    .UseStartup<Startup>()
    .UseIISIntegration();

Startup.cs

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    // Set up data directory
    services.AddDbContext<AuthContext>(options =>
        options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("AuthContext")));

    services.AddAuthentication(IISDefaults.AuthenticationScheme);
    services.AddAuthentication(JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme)
        .AddJwtBearer(options =>
        {
            options.TokenValidationParameters = new TokenValidationParameters
            {
                ValidateIssuer = true,
                ValidateAudience = true,
                ValidateLifetime = true,
                ValidateIssuerSigningKey = true,

                ValidIssuer = "AngularWebApp.Web",
                ValidAudience = "AngularWebApp.Web.Client",
                IssuerSigningKey = _signingKey,
                ClockSkew = TimeSpan.Zero   //the default for this setting is 5 minutes
            };
            options.Events = new JwtBearerEvents
            {
                OnAuthenticationFailed = context =>
                {
                    if (context.Exception.GetType() == typeof(SecurityTokenExpiredException))
                    {
                        context.Response.Headers.Add("Token-Expired", "true");
                    }
                    return Task.CompletedTask;
                }
            };
        });

    services.AddMvc().SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_1);

    // In production, the Angular files will be served from this directory
    services.AddSpaStaticFiles(configuration =>
    {
        configuration.RootPath = "ClientApp/dist";
    });
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    if (env.IsDevelopment())
    {
        app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage();
    }
    else
    {
        app.UseExceptionHandler("/Error");
        app.UseHsts();
    }

    app.UseHttpsRedirection();
    app.UseStaticFiles();
    app.UseSpaStaticFiles();
    app.UseAuthentication();

    app.UseWhen(context => context.Request.Path.StartsWithSegments("/sso"),
        builder => builder.UseMiddleware<WindowsAuthMiddleware>());

    app.UseMvc(routes =>
    {
        routes.MapRoute(
            name: "default",
            template: "{controller}/{action=Index}/{id?}");
    });

    app.UseSpa(spa =>
    {
        // To learn more about options for serving an Angular SPA from ASP.NET Core,
        // see https://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=864501

        spa.Options.SourcePath = "ClientApp";

        if (env.IsDevelopment())
        {
            spa.UseAngularCliServer(npmScript: "start");
        }
    });
}

WindowsAuthMiddleware.cs

public class WindowsAuthMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate next;

    public WindowsAuthMiddleware(RequestDelegate next)
    {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context)
    {
        if (!context.User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            await context.ChallengeAsync(IISDefaults.AuthenticationScheme);
            return;
        }

        await next(context);
    }
}

web.config

<system.webServer>
  <aspNetCore processPath="%LAUNCHER_PATH%" arguments="%LAUNCHER_ARGS%" stdoutLogEnabled="false" stdoutLogFile=".\logs\stdout" forwardWindowsAuthToken="true"/>
  <security>
    <authentication>
      <anonymousAuthentication enabled="true" />
      <windowsAuthentication enabled="true" />
    </authentication>
  </security>
</system.webServer>
2

So, I spent the last few days investigating this problem and I got a working - if a bit hacky - solution.

It turns out that the main problem is that IIS will handle the Windows Authentication negotiation for all 401 responses sent by the application. It's something that's done at a lower level as soon as you enable Windows Authentication in IIS (or in the system.webServer section), and I haven't been able to find a way to bypass this behaviour. I actually did a test with a classic Web Form app and it works the same - the reason I never noticed this is that classic Forms Authentication rarely generates 401 responses, rather it uses redirects (30x) to take the user to the login page.

This gave me an idea: I could add another middleware to the pipeline that rewrites 401 responses generated by the authorization infrastructure to another, rarely used HTTP code, and detect that in my client Angular app to make it behave as a 401 (by refreshing an access token, or denying router navigation, etc). I used HTTP error 418 "I'm a teapot" since it's an existing but unused code. Here is the code:

ReplaceHttp401StatusCodeMiddleware.cs

public class ReplaceHttp401StatusCodeMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate next;

    public ReplaceHttp401StatusCodeMiddleware(RequestDelegate next)
    {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context)
    {
        await next(context);

        if (context.Response.StatusCode == 401)
        {
            // Replace all 401 responses, except the ones under the /sso paths
            // which will let IIS trigger the Windows Authentication mechanisms
            if (!context.Request.Path.StartsWithSegments("/sso"))
            {
                context.Response.StatusCode = 418;
                context.Response.Headers["X-Original-HTTP-Status-Code"] = "401";
            }
        }
    }
}

Startup.cs

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
{
    ...

    // Enable the SSO login using Windows Authentication
    app.UseWhen(
            context => context.Request.Path.StartsWithSegments("/sso"),
            builder => builder.UseMiddleware<WindowsAuthMiddleware>());
    app.UseMiddleware<ReplaceHttp401StatusCodeMiddleware>();

    ...
}

The middleware also injects the original status code in the response for further reference.

I also applied to my code the suggestion from Mickaël Derriey to use Authorization policies because it makes the controllers cleaner, but it's not necessary for the solution to work.

0

Welcome to StackOverflow! That's an interesting quesiton you have here. First, let me state that I didn't test any of the content in this answer.

Using authorization policies to drive sources of authentication

I like the idea behind the WindowsAuthMiddleware you created, and how it's conditionally inserted in the pipeline if the URL starts with /sso.

MVC integrated with the authorization system and provides the same capabilities with authorization policies. The result is the same, and prevents you from having to write low-level code.

You can define authorization policies in the ConfigureServices method. In your case, if I'm not mistaken, there are two policies:

  • all requests to /sso should be authenticated with Windows authenticated; and
  • all other requests should be authenticated with JWTs
services.AddAuthorization(options =>
{
    options.AddPolicy("Windows", new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
        .AddAuthenticationSchemes(IISDefaults.AuthenticationScheme)
        .RequireAuthenticatedUser()
        .Build());

    options.AddPolicy("JWT", new AuthorizationPolicyBuilder()
        .AddAuthenticationSchemes(JwtBearerDefaults.AuthenticationScheme)
        .RequireAuthenticatedUser()
        .Build());
});

You can then reference those policies by name in the [Authorize] attributes used to decorate your controllers and/or actions.

[Authorize("Windows")]
public class SsoController : Controller
{
    // Actions
}

[Authorize("JWT")]
public class ApiController : Controller
{
    // Actions
}

Doing so means that the Windows authentication handler will not run against /api requests, hence the responses should not contain the WWW-Authenticate: NTLM and WWW-Authenticate: Negotiate headers.

Removing automatic authentication of all requests

When you pass an authentication scheme as an argument of AddAuthentication, this means the authentication middleware will try to authenticate every request against that scheme.

This is useful when you have one authentication scheme, but in this case, you could think about removing it, as even for requests to /sso, the JWT handler will analyze the request for a token.

Two calls to AddAuthentication

You should only have one call to AddAuthentication:

  • the first one sets the IIS authentication scheme as a default so the handler should run on every request;
  • the second call overwrites that setting and set the JWT scheme as the default one

Let me know how you go!

  • Thanks Mickaël, I will be studying the policy mechanism soon. Now that I solved the Windows Authentication problem (see response below) it's time to find out how to handle Roles and various kinds of permissions and I think that policies will help with that! – Luca Leonardo Scorcia Oct 30 '18 at 13:19
  • Quick question with the above - how do you handle the necessary parameters for jwt with this schema? I'm looking around the web to see if there's an alternative for .AddJwtBearer (which exists on AddAuthentication but there's no place for it in AddAuthorization) and I'm not coming up with anything. If I try to run this without any descriptors I get 500 server errors on my subsequent API calls. – carbon1479 Feb 10 at 5:44

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