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I have two NumPy arrays (of equal length), each with (equally-sized, square) NumPy matrices as elements. I want to do elementwise matrix multiplication of these two arrays, i.e. get back a single array where the i-th element is the matrix product of the i-th elements of my two arrays.

When I simply try to multiply the arrays together, it seems that the program tries to calculate the matrix product of the arrays, and then fails because their dimensionality is too high (1 for the array + 2 for the matrices which are its elements).

The problem could of course be solved with a for-loop, but I was hoping that there was some way in which it could be done that keeps everything internal to NumPy, in order to take full advantage of its increased efficiency.f

EDIT:

To clarify, say I have two arrays np.array([A, B, C]) and np.array([X, Y, Z]) where A, B, C, X, Y and Z are all 3x3 square matrices, what I need is a function that will return np.array([A*X, B*Y, C*Z]), where * is matrix multiplication.

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  • Please provide example of your data
    – Slam
    Oct 27, 2018 at 9:27
  • It might help if you describe the arrays as being (n, 3, 3) shaped. Prior to providing the @ (np.matmul), the best solution would have been: np.einsum('ijk,ikl->ijl', [A,B,C], [X,Y,Z]). It is still useful as a way of expressing, and visualizing, complex matrix products.
    – hpaulj
    Oct 27, 2018 at 16:12

2 Answers 2

5

Operators are "element-wise" by default for numpy arrays. Just use the @ operator (matrix multiplication) instead of *:

In [24]: A = np.arange(9).reshape(3,3)

In [25]: X = np.array([A[:], A[:]*2, A[:]*3])

In [26]: Y = X[:]

In [27]: X @ Y
Out[27]:
array([[[ 15,  18,  21],
        [ 42,  54,  66],
        [ 69,  90, 111]],

       [[ 60,  72,  84],
        [168, 216, 264],
        [276, 360, 444]],

       [[135, 162, 189],
        [378, 486, 594],
        [621, 810, 999]]])

In [28]: X[0] @ Y[0]
Out[28]:
array([[ 15,  18,  21],
       [ 42,  54,  66],
       [ 69,  90, 111]])

In [29]: X[1] @ Y[1]
Out[29]:
array([[ 60,  72,  84],
       [168, 216, 264],
       [276, 360, 444]])

In [30]: X[2] @ Y[2]
Out[30]:
array([[135, 162, 189],
       [378, 486, 594],
       [621, 810, 999]])

HTH.

1

* in numpy will do elementwise operations, i.e.:

>>> a
array([[[0.86812606, 0.16249293, 0.61555956],
        [0.12381998, 0.84800823, 0.80731896],
        [0.56910074, 0.4071833 , 0.069167  ]],

       [[0.69742877, 0.45354268, 0.7220556 ],
        [0.86638233, 0.97552151, 0.85580334],
        [0.01171408, 0.35997806, 0.72999056]]])

>>> b
array([[[0.17162968, 0.52103661, 0.05433799],
        [0.19999652, 0.01852179, 0.7936977 ],
        [0.22392469, 0.34535168, 0.92808129]],

       [[0.7044144 , 0.03183893, 0.16469416],
        [0.6214784 , 0.57722859, 0.23789282],
        [0.934214  , 0.61396596, 0.5356328 ]]])

>>> a * b
array([[[0.1489962 , 0.08466477, 0.03344827],
        [0.02476357, 0.01570663, 0.6407672 ],
        [0.12743571, 0.14062144, 0.06419259]],

       [[0.49127887, 0.01444031, 0.11891834],
        [0.5384379 , 0.5630989 , 0.20358947],
        [0.01094346, 0.22101428, 0.39100689]]])

Isn't this what you looking for?

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  • No, the desired outcome is to have an array where the elements are the matrix products, not elementwise products, of the matrices in my input arrays. Apologies if that was unclear.
    – Drubbels
    Oct 27, 2018 at 13:36

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