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I'm trying to make a prime number verifier that sees if a number is prime or not. The problem is that when I insert a prime number like 13 as the first number that I insert it says that's a prime number. After I insert a non-prime number like 48 and it says that is not prime. But now, if I insert a prime number it says that is not prime.

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController
{
    var D = 1
    var C = 0
    @IBOutlet weak var labelOUT: UILabel!
    @IBOutlet weak var numberIN: UITextField!

    @IBAction func Clear(_ sender: Any)
    {
      labelOUT.text = ""
    }

    @IBAction func calculate(_ sender: Any)
    {
        let number = Int(numberIN.text!)

        repeat
        {
            if (number! % D == 0)
            {
                C = C + 1
            }
            else
            {
            }
            D = D + 1
        }while(D <= number!)

        if ( C <= 2 )
        {
            labelOUT.text = "prime"
        }
        else
        {
            labelOUT.text = "not prime"
        }
    }

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        labelOUT.text = ""
    }
}
  • This simple algorithm considers any integer in ]-∞, 1] as prime – ielyamani Oct 27 '18 at 15:36
1

If you want a quick fix, declare C and D inside the calculate() function.

You don't have to find all divisors to check if a number is prime or not. Once you find a divisor, the number is not a prime.

Here is a more efficient way of checking if the text in the text field is prime or not:

@IBAction func calculate(_ sender: Any)
{
    guard let number = Int(numberIN.text!) else 
    {
        fatalError("Not a number")
    }

    let isPrime = checkIfPrime(number)
    labelOUT.text = isPrime ? "prime" : "not prime"
}

It calls this function to check if number is prime:

func checkIfPrime(_ n: Int) -> Bool 
{
    switch n 
    {
    case ...1:
        return false
    case 2...3:
        return true
    default:
        var isPrime = true
        let maximumPossibleDivisor = Int(sqrt(Double(n)))

        var divisor = 2
        repeat
        {
            if (n % divisor == 0)
            {
                isPrime = false
                break
            }
            divisor += 1
        } while (divisor <= maximumPossibleDivisor)

        return isPrime
    }
}

It uses the fact that a composite number has a divisor between 2 and its root square.


A more efficient version of checkPrime() uses the fact that prime numbers, other than 2 and 3 can all be written as 6X - 1 or 6X + 1:

func checkIfPrime(_ n: Int) -> Bool {
    switch n {
    case ...1:
        return false
    default:
        if n % 2 == 0 || n % 3 == 0
        {
            return false
        }

        let maximumPossibleDivisor = Int(sqrt(Double(n)))
        var divisor = 5
        while (divisor <= maximumPossibleDivisor)
        {
            if n % divisor == 0 || n % (divisor + 2) == 0
            {
                return false
            }
            divisor += 6
        }

        return true
    }
}

Here is a cute way of checking the primality of a number using a regex:

extension Int {
    func isPrime() -> Bool {
        guard self >= 0 else { fatalError("Primality is only checked for positive numbers") }
        let regex = try! NSRegularExpression(pattern: "^.?$|^(..+?)\\1+$")
        let str = Array(repeating: "1", count: self).joined()
        let range = NSMakeRange(0, self)
        return regex.matches(in: str, range: range).count == 0
    }
}

The way the regex works is explained thoroughly in here and there.


For more on primality tests have a look here.

-1

You need to reset C and D at the top of your calculate() method.

@IBAction func calculate(_ sender: Any)
{ 
    D = 1
    C = 0

Otherwise previously calculated results affect your newly calculated result. Next time you get stuck like this, set a few breakpoints and step carefully through the algorithm and study all the computations. You'll then either know what you did wrong or at least know what line didn't compute the way you were expecting and can focus a question on that line.

  • I'd be curious to know why I got downvoted for my answer. It's basically the same as the "quickfix" of Carpsen90's answer. Although I posted first, I expect Carpsen90 to get the solve due to being a much more detailed answer. Just wondering why the downvote... am I missing something here? – Smartcat Oct 29 '18 at 5:01

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