138

I'm trying out the new React Hooks and have a Clock component with a counter which is supposed to increase every second. However, the value does not increase beyond one.

function Clock() {
  const [time, setTime] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
      setTime(time + 1);
    }, 1000);
    return () => {
      window.clearInterval(timer);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>Seconds: {time}</div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Clock />, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

1
187

The reason is because the callback passed into setInterval's closure only accesses the time variable in the first render, it doesn't have access to the new time value in the subsequent render because the useEffect() is not invoked the second time.

time always has the value of 0 within the setInterval callback.

Like the setState you are familiar with, state hooks have two forms: one where it takes in the updated state, and the callback form which the current state is passed in. You should use the second form and read the latest state value within the setState callback to ensure that you have the latest state value before incrementing it.

Bonus: Alternative Approaches

Dan Abramov, goes in-depth into the topic about using setInterval with hooks in his blog post and provides alternative ways around this issue. Highly recommend reading it!

function Clock() {
  const [time, setTime] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
      setTime(prevTime => prevTime + 1); // <-- Change this line!
    }, 1000);
    return () => {
      window.clearInterval(timer);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>Seconds: {time}</div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Clock />, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

6
  • 2
    @YangshunTay If I just wanna read state value within setInterval, how should I do? – neosarchizo Feb 17 '20 at 1:36
  • 1
    @neosarchizo Have you read Dan's post? overreacted.io/making-setinterval-declarative-with-react-hooks. If you just want to read it, you can read the updated value as part of the rendering at the bottom. If you want to trigger side effects, you can add a useEffect() hook and add that state to the dependency array. – Yangshun Tay Feb 17 '20 at 3:34
  • How would it look like if you would like to output the current state periodically with console.log in the setInterval function? – user3579222 Mar 22 '20 at 10:28
  • I want to read the time (in setInterval) and update if greater than some time. How to accomplish this? – artsnr Jan 22 at 17:47
  • @neosarchizo " If you just want to read it, you can read the updated value as part of the rendering at the bottom." Didn't get it can you kindly elaborate it a bit – artsnr Jan 22 at 18:03
23

useEffect function is evaluated only once on component mount when empty input list is provided.

An alternative to setInterval is to set new interval with setTimeout each time the state is updated:

  const [time, setTime] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = setTimeout(() => {
      setTime(time + 1);
    }, 1000);
    return () => {
      clearTimeout(timer);
    };
  }, [time]);

The performance impact of setTimeout is insignificant and can be generally ignored. Unless the component is time-sensitive to the point where newly set timeouts cause undesirable effects, both setInterval and setTimeout approaches are acceptable.

19

As others have pointed out, the problem is that useState is only called once (as deps = []) to set up the interval:

React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
        setTime(time + 1);
    }, 1000);

    return () => window.clearInterval(timer);
}, []);

Then, every time setInterval ticks, it will actually call setTime(time + 1), but time will always hold the value it had initially when the setInterval callback (closure) was defined.

You can use the alternative form of useState's setter and provide a callback rather than the actual value you want to set (just like with setState):

setTime(prevTime => prevTime + 1);

But I would encourage you to create your own useInterval hook so that you can DRY and simplify your code by using setInterval declaratively, as Dan Abramov suggests here in Making setInterval Declarative with React Hooks:

function useInterval(callback, delay) {
  const intervalRef = React.useRef();
  const callbackRef = React.useRef(callback);

  // Remember the latest callback:
  //
  // Without this, if you change the callback, when setInterval ticks again, it
  // will still call your old callback.
  //
  // If you add `callback` to useEffect's deps, it will work fine but the
  // interval will be reset.

  React.useEffect(() => {
    callbackRef.current = callback;
  }, [callback]);

  // Set up the interval:

  React.useEffect(() => {
    if (typeof delay === 'number') {
      intervalRef.current = window.setInterval(() => callbackRef.current(), delay);

      // Clear interval if the components is unmounted or the delay changes:
      return () => window.clearInterval(intervalRef.current);
    }
  }, [delay]);
  
  // Returns a ref to the interval ID in case you want to clear it manually:
  return intervalRef;
}


const Clock = () => {
  const [time, setTime] = React.useState(0);
  const [isPaused, setPaused] = React.useState(false);
        
  const intervalRef = useInterval(() => {
    if (time < 10) {
      setTime(time + 1);
    } else {
      window.clearInterval(intervalRef.current);
    }
  }, isPaused ? null : 1000);

  return (<React.Fragment>
    <button onClick={ () => setPaused(prevIsPaused => !prevIsPaused) } disabled={ time === 10 }>
        { isPaused ? 'RESUME ⏳' : 'PAUSE 🚧' }
    </button>

    <p>{ time.toString().padStart(2, '0') }/10 sec.</p>
    <p>setInterval { time === 10 ? 'stopped.' : 'running...' }</p>
  </React.Fragment>);
}

ReactDOM.render(<Clock />, document.querySelector('#app'));
body,
button {
  font-family: monospace;
}

body, p {
  margin: 0;
}

p + p {
  margin-top: 8px;
}

#app {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  align-items: center;
  min-height: 100vh;
}

button {
  margin: 32px 0;
  padding: 8px;
  border: 2px solid black;
  background: transparent;
  cursor: pointer;
  border-radius: 2px;
}
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

Apart from producing simpler and cleaner code, this allows you to pause (and clear) the interval automatically by simply passing delay = null and also returns the interval ID, in case you want to cancel it yourself manually (that's not covered in Dan's posts).

Actually, this could also be improved so that it doesn't restart the delay when unpaused, but I guess for most uses cases this is good enough.

If you are looking for a similar answer for setTimeout rather than setInterval, check this out: https://stackoverflow.com/a/59274757/3723993.

You can also find declarative version of setTimeout and setInterval, useTimeout and useInterval, plus a custom useThrottledCallback hook written in TypeScript in https://gist.github.com/Danziger/336e75b6675223ad805a88c2dfdcfd4a.

5

An alternative solution would be to use useReducer, as it will always be passed the current state.

function Clock() {
  const [time, dispatch] = React.useReducer((state = 0, action) => {
    if (action.type === 'add') return state + 1
    return state
  });
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
      dispatch({ type: 'add' });
    }, 1000);
    return () => {
      window.clearInterval(timer);
    };
  }, []);

  return (
    <div>Seconds: {time}</div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Clock />, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

2
  • Why useEffect here is being called multiple times to update the time, while the dependencies array is empty, which means that the useEffect should be called only the first time the component/app renders? – BlackMath Sep 25 '20 at 23:20
  • 1
    @BlackMath The function inside useEffect is called only once, when the component first renders indeed. But inside of it, there is a setInterval which is in charge of changing the time on a regular basis. I suggest you read a bit about setInterval, things should be clearer after that ! developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/… – Bear-Foot Sep 27 '20 at 12:48
3

Do as below it works fine.

const [count , setCount] = useState(0);

async function increment(count,value) {
    await setCount(count => count + 1);
  }

//call increment function
increment(count);
1
  • Where is setInterval used in your answer ? – Vasanth May 10 at 17:49
2

This solutions dont work for me because i need to get the variable and do some stuff not just update it.

I get a workaround to get the updated value of the hook with a promise

Eg:

async function getCurrentHookValue(setHookFunction) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    setHookFunction(prev => {
      resolve(prev)
      return prev;
    })
  })
}

With this i can get the value inside the setInterval function like this

let dateFrom = await getCurrentHackValue(setSelectedDateFrom);
0
1

useRef can solve this problem, here is a similar component which increase the counter in every 1000ms

import { useState, useEffect, useRef } from "react";

export default function App() {
  const initalState = 0;
  const [count, setCount] = useState(initalState);
  const counterRef = useRef(initalState);

  useEffect(() => {
    counterRef.current = count;
  })

  useEffect(() => {
    setInterval(() => {
      setCount(counterRef.current + 1);
    }, 1000);
  }, []);

  return (
    <div className="App">
      <h1>The current count is:</h1>
      <h2>{count}</h2>
    </div>
  );
}

and i think this article will help you about using interval for react hooks

0

Tell React re-render when time changed.opt out

function Clock() {
  const [time, setTime] = React.useState(0);
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
      setTime(time + 1);
    }, 1000);
    return () => {
      window.clearInterval(timer);
    };
  }, [time]);

  return (
    <div>Seconds: {time}</div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(<Clock />, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

2
  • 2
    The problem with this is that the timer will be cleared and reset after every count change. – sumail Mar 21 '19 at 6:51
  • And because so setTimeout() is preferred as pointed out by Estus – Chayim Friedman Jul 16 '20 at 9:33

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