6

In the code below, I explicitly force the name from the main function to be moved into the closure, and everything works just fine:

fn main() {
    let name = String::from("Alice");

    let welcome = || {
        let mut name = name;
        name += " and Bob";
        println!("Welcome, {}", name);
    };

    welcome();
}

I would have thought that adding a move to the beginning of the closure would accomplish the same thing, and result in the value being moved and the creation of a FnOnce:

fn main() {
    let name = String::from("Alice");

    let welcome = move || {
        name += " and Bob";
        println!("Welcome, {}", name);
    };

    welcome();
}

Instead, however, I get the error message:

error[E0596]: cannot borrow immutable local variable `welcome` as mutable
 --> main.rs:9:5
  |
4 |     let welcome = move || {
  |         ------- help: make this binding mutable: `mut welcome`
...
9 |     welcome();
  |     ^^^^^^^ cannot borrow mutably

error[E0596]: cannot borrow captured outer variable in an `FnMut` closure as mutable
 --> main.rs:5:9
  |
5 |         name += " and Bob";
  |         ^^^^

What's the correct way to think about move on a closure in this case?

1
  • Please note the compiler told you what to do: help: make this binding mutable: `mut welcome`
    – Shepmaster
    Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 20:49

1 Answer 1

7

I would have thought that adding a move to the beginning of the closure would accomplish the same thing, …

It kind of does the same thing. You just forgot to declare name and welcome as mutable. This code works fine:

fn main() {
    let mut name = String::from("Alice");

    let mut welcome = move || {
        name += " and Bob";
        println!("Welcome, {}", name);
    };

    welcome();
}

Both versions of the closure result in name being moved into the closure. In the first version, this is implicitly caused by consuming name inside the closure. The second version does not consume name, but uses the move keyword to force the move.

… and result in the value being moved and the creation of a FnOnce.

Moving a value into a closure does not make it FnOnce. If a closure consumes a captured value, it becomes FnOnce, since it obviously can do this only once. Thus, the first version of the closure is FnOnce, since it consumes name. The clousre above is FnMut, and can be called multiple times. Calling it twice results in the output

Welcome, Alice and Bob
Welcome, Alice and Bob and Bob

(I used the function trait names somewhat sloppily above. In fact, every closure implements FnOnce, since every closure can be called at least once. Some closures can be called multiple times, so they are FnMut in addition. And some closures that can be called multiple times don't alter their captured state, so they are Fn in addition to the other two traits.)

5
  • While the rewrite you've provided (adding the muts) does compile, it's semantically different from the first version of the code I provided. In particular, in the first version, calling welcome() a second time is an error due to usage of a moved value. I realize that in this case I can mutable borrow the values instead, but I'm trying to understand why move doesn't force the value to be moved into the closure. Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 8:57
  • 2
    Try to print name variable after welcome. It will result in compile-time error, because of move keyword. You can calling welcome multiple times, because it is FnMut and it captures the name variable. This code from the rust by example may clarify it Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 9:17
  • 2
    @MichaelSnoyman move does force name to be moved into the closure. The first version also moves the value into the closure, but then consumes it inside the closure. A closure that consumes a captured value can only be called once. Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 9:22
  • @MichaelSnoyman I added a few sentences to this answer – hope it's clearer now. Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 9:27
  • Thanks @SvenMarnach, this helped. The piece that was alluding me was the distinction between moving a value and consuming a value. The link to Rust by Example was elucidating as well Artemiy. Commented Oct 28, 2018 at 11:06

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