-3

This question already has an answer here:

I want to test whether any single bit is set in a C int. I don't care which bit it is.

Equivalent to

if (1 == count_bits (n))

I'm curious if there is a non-looping algorithm for this which does not require special hardware support.

marked as duplicate by Lundin c Oct 29 '18 at 12:56

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  • 9
    Check if n is non-zero? – Some programmer dude Oct 29 '18 at 10:19
  • 3
    Your text might indicate, that you are looking for a == 0, but your code snippet indicates, that you want to check if exactly one bit is set. Can you please specify it? – hellow Oct 29 '18 at 10:19
  • 2
    In an int? How do you want negative values handled? – StoryTeller Oct 29 '18 at 10:31
5

If only one bit is set, then the number is a power of two.

unsigned int IsPowerOfTwoNoLoop(unsigned int input)
{
    unsigned int temp = input;
    if(0 == input)
    {
      return 0;
    }
    temp -= 1;
    /*Example of the logic:*/
    /*  0100 (4 DEC) - 1 = 0011
        0011 & 0100 = 0000 
    */
    if (temp & input) /* if not zero - not pow of two */
    {
        printf("%u Is NOT the power of two !\n", input);
        return 0;
    }

    printf("%u Is the power of two !\n", input);
    return 1;
}
  • For the explanation see stackoverflow.com/questions/600293/… – hellow Oct 29 '18 at 10:26
  • I would suggest to use uint32_t instead of unsigned int. Why don't you accept any digit and reinterpret them as an unsigned value in your function? – hellow Oct 29 '18 at 10:33
  • 1
    Review: it would be much clearer (=better) to return bool from this function. – unwind Oct 29 '18 at 10:41
1

The simplest way is probably to convert to an unsigned type.

Then we are simply testing whether we have an exact power of two.

We can use a simple observation that these are the only non-zero numbers that have no bits in common with n-1:

bool is_power_of_two(unsigned int n)
{
    return n && ! (n & (n-1));
}
  • "This code falsely returns one when input is zero. – Eric Postpischil" – Kami Kaze Oct 29 '18 at 10:47
  • Oops - I mistakenly thought I'd taken that into account, and failed. – Toby Speight Oct 29 '18 at 11:30

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