2

This question already has an answer here:

I am starting to get the hang of OOP. Can someone explain this one concept to me with a python context though? I have a couple classes:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = 'hello'

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        self.bar = 'world'

So I understand, mechanically that when I make a new __ init __ def in class B it overrides class A's __ init __. But I want to know why.

I want to make a instance of class B with it's own init, but I also want it to have A's init. So far the only solution I know of to get what I want, is to just copy the code from A's __ init __ on top of B's.

So I do:

class A(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = 'hello'

class B(A):
    def __init__(self):
        self.foo = 'hello'
        self.bar = 'world'

But with object inheritance, I figure there should be a better way to do this. How do most people go about making an init for subclasses, while still inheriting the things from the base class? Do you seriously have to copy paste everything you want into the subclass?

marked as duplicate by Brad Solomon, Aran-Fey python Oct 29 '18 at 15:52

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    Use super and call your parent classes' init inside your child class init – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 29 '18 at 15:46
  • 1
    And note, even without super you could always do A.__init__(self) in B's init ... You never should have to copy and paste code. Remember, methods are just functions. You can call them anywhere – juanpa.arrivillaga Oct 29 '18 at 15:47

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.