5

I have an object foo

interface Foo {
    fooId: string;
    otherStuff: any;
}

Now I have an object fooCollection, which is an object containing an undefined number of foos. Each property is a string equals to fooId. How could I define an accurate interface for fooCollection?

So far I came up with this:

interface FooCollection {
    [key: string]: Foo;
}

-How could I tell ts that the number of property could be anything?

-Can I be more precise about the prop name, saying that it's fooId instead of any string?

2
  • Your index signature already allows any number of properties (zero or more). Can you clarify what you mean by the property name is "fooId instead of any string"? Do you mean that the name of each property should match the fooId field of the Foo object that is the value of the property? Oct 30, 2018 at 23:09
  • @ Matt McCutchen "Do you mean that the name of each property should match the fooId field of the Foo object that is the value of the property?" => exactly! Oct 31, 2018 at 9:19

1 Answer 1

9

The index signature [key: string]: Foo already allows any number of properties (zero or more).

Writing a single type that enforces that the name of each property matches the fooId of the Foo object is beyond the capabilities of TypeScript's type system. You could write a FooCollection type that is generic in the set of IDs used, and that will allow you to write a generic function to validate handwritten FooCollection literals:

interface Foo<Id extends string> {
    fooId: Id;
    otherStuff: any;
}

type FooCollection<Ids extends string> = { [Id in Ids]: Foo<Id> };

function checkFooCollection<Ids extends string>
    (fooCollection: FooCollection<Ids>) { 
    return fooCollection;
}

// OK
let c1 = checkFooCollection({
    a: {fooId: "a", otherStuff: 5}
});

// Error
let c2 = checkFooCollection({
    a: {fooId: "b", otherStuff: 5}
});

But if you are building FooCollection objects at runtime, this approach is unlikely to give you any more meaningful checking than your original approach.

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