8

I have this:

public class Foo
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public Bar Bar { get; set; }
}

public class Bar
{
    public int Something { get; set; }
    public int SomethingElse { get; set; }
}

and my database is like this:

CREATE TABLE [Foo](
    [Id]                 INT,
    [Bar_Something]      INT    NOT NULL,
    [Bar_SomethingElse]  INT    NOT NULL,
)

When I get the DB context with

public class DB: DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Foo> Foo { get; set; }
}

Foo.Id is mapped correctly but Bar cannot be mapped with this error System.InvalidOperationException : The entity type 'Bar' requires a primary key to be defined.

I don't want to create Bar table and give its id as FK to Foo. How can I map the columns Bar_Something and Bar_SomethingElse to Foo.Bar.Something and Foo.Bar.SomethingElse?

3
  • You can use [NotMapped] property attribute like => [NotMapped] public Bar Bar { get; set; }
    – er-sho
    Oct 30, 2018 at 11:24
  • Is this possible? have you search about it? Without creating table how you can give a foreign key? Oct 30, 2018 at 11:26
  • EF Core 2.0 and later support owned entity types. I suspect whoever designed the table had that in mind. Oct 30, 2018 at 11:41

3 Answers 3

10

EF Core 2.0 and later support Owned entity types. By default, those are mapped using Table splitting.

In EF Core 2.1, you probably only need to add the [Owned] attribute to Bar, ie :

[Owned]
public class Bar
{
    public int Something { get; set; }
    public int SomethingElse { get; set; }
}

The owned type's properties will be mapped to fields in the same table named Property_OwnedProperty. In this case it will be Bar_Something and Bar_SomethingElse

Looks like someone designed the table with those requirements in mind.

In EF Core 2.0 you need to specify the owned type in the context configuration :

modelBuilder.Entity<Foo>().OwnsOne(p => p.Bar);
6
  • I prefer the context configuration over annotation for domain objects. Domain objects should not reference any implementation specific frameworks like ef core.
    – Tigerware
    Oct 4, 2022 at 15:03
  • So it depends on whether it is a domain model or database adapter model.
    – Tigerware
    Oct 4, 2022 at 15:03
  • @Tigerware there's no such difference. ORMs like Entity Framework are Domain Repositories, not data access libraries (that's what ADO.NET is for). A DbContext is already a multi-entity repository and Unit of Work, ideally designed for a specific bounded context. It's neither a database nor a domain model. The data adapter is the database specific ADO.NET provider and the abstract DbCommand, DbConnection, DbDataReader classes. And just maybe, the SQL generator. An application can have different DbContexts for different use cases Oct 5, 2022 at 6:50
  • @Tigerware in fact, the very first versions of Entity Framework had two models, a domain and data model. The reaction of developers was .... not nice. I was at the MVP summit when the EF team first showed EF to C# MVPs and ... I think the word "eviscerated" would be appropriate. The years that followed showed that having two models was useless and only added complexity as the applications only needed a single model at a time. Maintaining two semi-identical models only caused bugs for no benefit. If you needed a different domain model for each scenario, what's the point of the data model? Oct 5, 2022 at 6:54
  • Yes, using the domain model for the database adapter should be the default! But when the database tables differentiate too much from the domain model, it might be required to create an extra data model.
    – Tigerware
    Oct 5, 2022 at 16:24
0

What you seem to be looking for is Table Splitting - the second entity of Bar will still need an ID field though it would be the same field that is used for the Foo object, meaning it will join them on a 1-1 basis perfectly.

This allows you to map the ID field of the table to multiple objects, then becoming both the principal and foreign key for the join.

you can read more about it an a quick example over Here as a pretty simple blog post demo.

This can also be done using the [Owned] attribute - the difference between using owned and simply mapping two objects to the same table is that an Owned object will only ever be a navigational property - so you wouldnt be able to just look for Bar you would always have to look for Foo and include Bar.

Depending on how you want them to behave (independent, or dependant) you have the two options for table splitting.

-1

a primary key to be defined in your Bar class.

public class Bar
{
    [Key]
    public int Something { get; set; }
    public int SomethingElse { get; set; }
}
1
  • Defining the Something property as the primary key would be wrong, it wouldnt give him any fields to join on and you dont even know if that field is unique to be appropriate for a Primary Key
    – Gibbon
    Oct 30, 2018 at 11:36

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