455

I'm having a hard time figuring out how to move an array element. For example, given the following:

var arr = [ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'];

How can I write a function to move 'd' before 'b'?

Or 'a' after 'c'?

After the move, the indices of the rest of the elements should be updated. This means in the first example after the move arr[0] would = 'a', arr[1] = 'd' arr[2] = 'b', arr[3] = 'c', arr[4] = 'e'

This seems like it should be pretty simple, but I can't wrap my head around it.

  • 2
    well this question old but gold – Jalal Feb 21 at 22:49

22 Answers 22

627
+150

If you'd like a version on npm, array-move is the closest to this answer, although it's not the same implementation. See its usage section for more details. The previous version of this answer (that modified Array.prototype.move) can be found on npm at array.prototype.move.


I had fairly good success with this function:

function array_move(arr, old_index, new_index) {
    if (new_index >= arr.length) {
        var k = new_index - arr.length + 1;
        while (k--) {
            arr.push(undefined);
        }
    }
    arr.splice(new_index, 0, arr.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
    return arr; // for testing
};

// returns [2, 1, 3]
console.log(array_move([1, 2, 3], 0, 1)); 

Note that the last return is simply for testing purposes: splice performs operations on the array in-place, so a return is not necessary. By extension, this move is an in-place operation. If you want to avoid that and return a copy, use slice.

Stepping through the code:

  1. If new_index is greater than the length of the array, we want (I presume) to pad the array properly with new undefineds. This little snippet handles this by pushing undefined on the array until we have the proper length.
  2. Then, in arr.splice(old_index, 1)[0], we splice out the old element. splice returns the element that was spliced out, but it's in an array. In our above example, this was [1]. So we take the first index of that array to get the raw 1 there.
  3. Then we use splice to insert this element in the new_index's place. Since we padded the array above if new_index > arr.length, it will probably appear in the right place, unless they've done something strange like pass in a negative number.

A fancier version to account for negative indices:

function array_move(arr, old_index, new_index) {
    while (old_index < 0) {
        old_index += arr.length;
    }
    while (new_index < 0) {
        new_index += arr.length;
    }
    if (new_index >= arr.length) {
        var k = new_index - arr.length + 1;
        while (k--) {
            arr.push(undefined);
        }
    }
    arr.splice(new_index, 0, arr.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
    return arr; // for testing purposes
};
    
// returns [1, 3, 2]
console.log(array_move([1, 2, 3], -1, -2));

Which should account for things like array_move([1, 2, 3], -1, -2) properly (move the last element to the second to last place). Result for that should be [1, 3, 2].

Either way, in your original question, you would do array_move(arr, 0, 2) for a after c. For d before b, you would do array_move(arr, 3, 1).

  • 18
    This works perfectly! And your explanation is very clear. Thanks for taking the time to write this up. – Mark Brown Mar 15 '11 at 4:31
  • 15
    You shouldn't manipulate Object and Array prototypes, it causes problems when iterating elements. – burak emre Mar 19 '13 at 1:38
  • 9
    @burakemre: I think that conclusion is not so clearly reached. Most good JS programmers (and most popular libraries) will use a .hasOwnProperty check when iterating with things like for..in, especially with libraries like Prototype and MooTools which modify prototypes. Anyway, I didn't feel it was a particularly important issue in a relatively limited example like this, and there is a nice split in the community over whether or not prototype modification is a good idea. Normally, iteration problems are the least concern, though. – Reid Mar 19 '13 at 3:24
  • 3
    There is no need for the loop in step 1, you can simply use this[new_index] = undefined; within the if block. As Javascript arrays are sparse this will extend the array size to include the new_index for the .splice to work but without needing to create any intervening elements. – Michael Jul 3 '15 at 11:23
  • 3
    @Michael: Good point - but doing this[new_index] = undefined will actually put an undefined in the array slot before the correct index. (E.g., [1,2,3].move(0,10) will have 1 in slot 10 and undefined in slot 9.) Rather, if sparseness is OK, we could do this[new_index] = this.splice(old_index, 1)[0] without the other splice call (make it an if/else instead). – Reid Jul 3 '15 at 13:37
247

Here's a one liner I found on JSPerf....

Array.prototype.move = function(from, to) {
    this.splice(to, 0, this.splice(from, 1)[0]);
};

which is awesome to read, but if you want performance (in small data sets) try...

 Array.prototype.move2 = function(pos1, pos2) {
    // local variables
    var i, tmp;
    // cast input parameters to integers
    pos1 = parseInt(pos1, 10);
    pos2 = parseInt(pos2, 10);
    // if positions are different and inside array
    if (pos1 !== pos2 && 0 <= pos1 && pos1 <= this.length && 0 <= pos2 && pos2 <= this.length) {
      // save element from position 1
      tmp = this[pos1];
      // move element down and shift other elements up
      if (pos1 < pos2) {
        for (i = pos1; i < pos2; i++) {
          this[i] = this[i + 1];
        }
      }
      // move element up and shift other elements down
      else {
        for (i = pos1; i > pos2; i--) {
          this[i] = this[i - 1];
        }
      }
      // put element from position 1 to destination
      this[pos2] = tmp;
    }
  }

I can't take any credit, it should all go to Richard Scarrott. It beats the splice based method for smaller data sets in this performance test. It is however significantly slower on larger data sets as Darwayne points out.

  • 2
    Your more performant solution is slower on large datasets. jsperf.com/array-prototype-move/8 – Darwayne May 20 '13 at 11:55
  • 36
    This seems like a really silly tradeof. Performance on small data sets is a negligible gain, but loss on large data sets is a significant loss. Your net exchange is negative. – Kyeotic Nov 6 '13 at 2:30
  • 3
    @Reid That wasn't a requirement. IMO it is okay to assume that the length of the array doesn't get modified. – robsch Mar 8 '16 at 10:57
  • 1
    One line solution need to handle two situations: from >= to ? this.splice(to, 0, this.splice(from, 1)[0]) : this.splice(to - 1, 0, this.splice(from, 1)[0]); – Rob L Jul 7 '17 at 1:42
  • 11
    Please never modify builtin prototypes, ever. nczonline.net/blog/2010/03/02/… – LJHarb Jan 4 '18 at 3:17
180

I like this way. It works, it's concise and elegant.

function arraymove(arr, fromIndex, toIndex) {
    var element = arr[fromIndex];
    arr.splice(fromIndex, 1);
    arr.splice(toIndex, 0, element);
}

Note: always remember to check your array bounds.

Here's a jsFiddle to test: https://jsfiddle.net/aq9Laaew/286055/

  • 23
    Since Array.splice returns the removed value(s) in a new Array, you can write it as a one liner... arr.splice(index + 1, 0, arr.splice(index, 1)[0]); – Eric Feb 3 '14 at 19:20
  • 34
    Personally I prefer the 3 line code. It's easier to understand: Get a copy of the element; remove it from the array; insert it in a new position. The one liner is shorter but not so clear for other people to understand... – Philipp Jan 3 '18 at 22:15
  • 4
    The toIndex will not be correct when to > from – GoGoris Dec 5 '18 at 15:16
  • I see where you're coming from but you're probably thinking to a swap rather than a move. When you insert the spare element, the toIndex will always represent the position in the <length-1> long array. – SteakOverflow Dec 5 '18 at 16:35
  • 1
    Here's a jsFiddle to test jsfiddle.net/aq9Laaew/286055 – SteakOverflow Dec 5 '18 at 16:36
33

The splice() method adds/removes items to/from an array, and returns the removed item(s).

Note: This method changes the original array. /w3schools/

Array.prototype.move = function(from,to){
  this.splice(to,0,this.splice(from,1)[0]);
  return this;
};

var arr = [ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'];
arr.move(3,1);//["a", "d", "b", "c", "e"]


var arr = [ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'];
arr.move(0,2);//["b", "c", "a", "d", "e"]

as the function is chainable this works too:

alert(arr.move(0,2).join(','));

demo here

  • Is there any library that uses this? Pretty neat! – uicoded Nov 4 '16 at 4:29
  • See other comments about this: it's a bad idea to modify built-in prototypes like Array and Object. You will break things. – geoidesic Jan 29 '18 at 19:10
25

My 2c. Easy to read, it works, it's fast, it doesn't create new arrays.

function move(array, from, to) {
  if( to === from ) return array;

  var target = array[from];                         
  var increment = to < from ? -1 : 1;

  for(var k = from; k != to; k += increment){
    array[k] = array[k + increment];
  }
  array[to] = target;
  return array;
}
  • 2
    At first string of function you should return array, as it done at the end. – Sergey Voronezhskiy Mar 31 '17 at 8:11
  • 3
    True how did i miss that? Fixed! – Merc Mar 31 '17 at 11:53
  • I like your simple and flexible solution the most. Thx! – Roman M. Koss Nov 6 '17 at 16:44
16

Got this idea from @Reid of pushing something in the place of the item that is supposed to be moved to keep the array size constant. That does simplify calculations. Also, pushing an empty object has the added benefits of being able to search for it uniquely later on. This works because two objects are not equal until they are referring to the same object.

({}) == ({}); // false

So here's the function which takes in the source array, and the source, destination indexes. You could add it to the Array.prototype if needed.

function moveObjectAtIndex(array, sourceIndex, destIndex) {
    var placeholder = {};
    // remove the object from its initial position and
    // plant the placeholder object in its place to
    // keep the array length constant
    var objectToMove = array.splice(sourceIndex, 1, placeholder)[0];
    // place the object in the desired position
    array.splice(destIndex, 0, objectToMove);
    // take out the temporary object
    array.splice(array.indexOf(placeholder), 1);
}
  • 1
    This looks promising...and I didn't know that about javascript js comparisons. Thanks! – Mark Brown Mar 15 '11 at 4:32
  • Does't works for case sourceIndex = 0, destIndex = 1 – Sergey Voronezhskiy Mar 31 '17 at 8:02
  • destIndex is meant to be the index before the source element is moved in the array. – Anurag Apr 17 '17 at 5:04
  • This is the best answer so far. Other answers failed a couple of unit tests in my suite (moving object forward) – Ilya Ivanov Mar 15 at 13:56
15

This is based on @Reid's solution. Except:

  • I'm not changing the Array prototype.
  • Moving an item out of bounds to the right does not create undefined items, it just moves the item to the right-most position.

Function:

function move(array, oldIndex, newIndex) {
    if (newIndex >= array.length) {
        newIndex = array.length - 1;
    }
    array.splice(newIndex, 0, array.splice(oldIndex, 1)[0]);
    return array;
}

Unit tests:

describe('ArrayHelper', function () {
    it('Move right', function () {
        let array = [1, 2, 3];
        arrayHelper.move(array, 0, 1);
        assert.equal(array[0], 2);
        assert.equal(array[1], 1);
        assert.equal(array[2], 3);
    })
    it('Move left', function () {
        let array = [1, 2, 3];
        arrayHelper.move(array, 1, 0);
        assert.equal(array[0], 2);
        assert.equal(array[1], 1);
        assert.equal(array[2], 3);
    });
    it('Move out of bounds to the left', function () {
        let array = [1, 2, 3];
        arrayHelper.move(array, 1, -2);
        assert.equal(array[0], 2);
        assert.equal(array[1], 1);
        assert.equal(array[2], 3);
    });
    it('Move out of bounds to the right', function () {
        let array = [1, 2, 3];
        arrayHelper.move(array, 1, 4);
        assert.equal(array[0], 1);
        assert.equal(array[1], 3);
        assert.equal(array[2], 2);
    });
});
  • this is wrong, if you insert a post position, the index will change since you have remove the item – Yao Zhao May 13 '16 at 13:14
  • Thank you. I wanted to remove an item from an array without leaving a null element (which occured when using splice(indexToRemove). I used your method to move the item I wanted to remove to the end of the array, and then used the pop() method to remove. – Luke Schoen Jul 9 '16 at 13:12
  • liked "move the item to the right-most position" feature, useful for my case. thx – bFunc Aug 20 '18 at 13:17
10

Here is my one liner ES6 solution with an optional parameter on.

if (typeof Array.prototype.move === "undefined") {
  Array.prototype.move = function(from, to, on = 1) {
    this.splice(to, 0, ...this.splice(from, on))
  }
}

Adaptation of the first solution proposed by digiguru

The parameter on is the number of element starting from from you want to move.

  • The solution is fine. However, when you expand a prototype you shouldn't use arrow function because in this case 'this' is not an array instance but for example Window object. – wawka Jun 23 '18 at 6:40
7

One approach would be to create a new array with the pieces in the order you want, using the slice method.

Example

var arr = [ 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'e'];
var arr2 = arr.slice(0,1).concat( ['d'] ).concat( arr.slice(2,4) ).concat( arr.slice(4) );
  • arr.slice(0,1) gives you ['a']
  • arr.slice(2,4) gives you ['b', 'c']
  • arr.slice(4) gives you ['e']
  • 1
    You do realize that your arr2 ends up being a string due to the concatenation operations, right? :) It ends up being "adc,de". – Ken Franqueiro Mar 15 '11 at 2:07
  • @Ken: thanks, fixed. – Jared Updike Mar 15 '11 at 16:03
6

The splice method of Array might help: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/splice

Just keep in mind it might be relatively expensive since it has to actively re-index the array.

  • Yep, but as soon as I perform the splice, the array indices are updated, which makes it difficult for me to figure out where to place the element that I just removed. Especially since I need the function to be able to handle moves in both directions. – Mark Brown Mar 15 '11 at 2:12
  • @Mark: don't splice the string and save it into the same variable, make a new string and splice that. See my answer below. – Jared Updike Mar 15 '11 at 16:04
6

You can implement some basic Calculus and create a universal function for moving array element from one position to the other.

For JavaScript it looks like this:

function magicFunction (targetArray, indexFrom, indexTo) { 

    targetElement = targetArray[indexFrom]; 
    magicIncrement = (indexTo - indexFrom) / Math.abs (indexTo - indexFrom); 

    for (Element = indexFrom; Element != indexTo; Element += magicIncrement){ 
        targetArray[Element] = targetArray[Element + magicIncrement]; 
    } 

    targetArray[indexTo] = targetElement; 

}

Check out "moving array elements" at "gloommatter" for detailed explanation.

http://www.gloommatter.com/DDesign/programming/moving-any-array-elements-universal-function.html

  • 1
    This ought to be the correct answer, as it does not allocate any new arrays. Thanks! – Cᴏʀʏ Aug 4 '13 at 0:56
5

I needed an immutable move method (one that didn't change the original array), so I adapted @Reid's accepted answer to simply use Object.assign to create a copy of the array before doing the splice.

Array.prototype.immutableMove = function (old_index, new_index) {
  var copy = Object.assign([], this);
  if (new_index >= copy.length) {
      var k = new_index - copy.length;
      while ((k--) + 1) {
          copy.push(undefined);
      }
  }
  copy.splice(new_index, 0, copy.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
  return copy;
};

Here is a jsfiddle showing it in action.

  • It's always good to see ppl taking mutations into considerations. – Hooman Askari Aug 14 '17 at 11:22
4
    Array.prototype.moveUp = function (value, by) {
        var index = this.indexOf(value),
            newPos = index - (by || 1);

        if (index === -1)
            throw new Error("Element not found in array");

        if (newPos < 0)
            newPos = 0;

        this.splice(index, 1);
        this.splice(newPos, 0, value);
    };

    Array.prototype.moveDown = function (value, by) {
        var index = this.indexOf(value),
            newPos = index + (by || 1);

        if (index === -1)
            throw new Error("Element not found in array");

        if (newPos >= this.length)
            newPos = this.length;

        this.splice(index, 1);
        this.splice(newPos, 0, value);
    };



    var arr = ['banana', 'curyWurst', 'pc', 'remembaHaruMembaru'];

    alert('withiout changes= '+arr[0]+' ||| '+arr[1]+' ||| '+arr[2]+' ||| '+arr[3]);
    arr.moveDown(arr[2]);


    alert('third word moved down= '+arr[0] + ' ||| ' + arr[1] + ' ||| ' + arr[2] + ' ||| ' + arr[3]);
    arr.moveUp(arr[2]);
    alert('third word moved up= '+arr[0] + ' ||| ' + arr[1] + ' ||| ' + arr[2] + ' ||| ' + arr[3]);

http://plnkr.co/edit/JaiAaO7FQcdPGPY6G337?p=preview

4

I've implemented an immutable ECMAScript 6 solution based off of @Merc's answer over here:

const moveItemInArrayFromIndexToIndex = (array, fromIndex, toIndex) => {
  if (fromIndex === toIndex) return array;

  const newArray = [...array];

  const target = newArray[fromIndex];
  const inc = toIndex < fromIndex ? -1 : 1;

  for (let i = fromIndex; i !== toIndex; i += inc) {
    newArray[i] = newArray[i + inc];
  }

  newArray[toIndex] = target;

  return newArray;
};

The variable names can be shortened, just used long ones so that the code can explain itself.

  • definitely a better answer, mutations creates side effects – Matt Lo Oct 19 '18 at 4:30
  • 1
    Out of curiosity, why not just return array immediately if fromIndex === toIndex, and only create the newArray if it's not the case? Immutability doesn't mean that one fresh copy must be created per function call even when there's no change. Just asking b/c the motive for the increased length of this function (relative to splice based one-liners) is performance, and fromIndex may well often equal toIndex, depending on the usage. – Robert Monfera Nov 1 '18 at 19:49
  • Good point, I'll change my answer accordingly, nice spot! – Barry Michael Doyle Nov 2 '18 at 11:16
2

Array.move.js

Summary

Moves elements within an array, returning an array containing the moved elements.

Syntax

array.move(index, howMany, toIndex);

Parameters

index: Index at which to move elements. If negative, index will start from the end.

howMany: Number of elements to move from index.

toIndex: Index of the array at which to place the moved elements. If negative, toIndex will start from the end.

Usage

array = ["a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f", "g"];

array.move(3, 2, 1); // returns ["d","e"]

array; // returns ["a", "d", "e", "b", "c", "f", "g"]

Polyfill

Array.prototype.move || Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, "move", {
    value: function (index, howMany, toIndex) {
        var
        array = this,
        index = parseInt(index) || 0,
        index = index < 0 ? array.length + index : index,
        toIndex = parseInt(toIndex) || 0,
        toIndex = toIndex < 0 ? array.length + toIndex : toIndex,
        toIndex = toIndex <= index ? toIndex : toIndex <= index + howMany ? index : toIndex - howMany,
        moved;

        array.splice.apply(array, [toIndex, 0].concat(moved = array.splice(index, howMany)));

        return moved;
    }
});
  • 2
    While the .move looks like it should work (I haven't tested it), you should note that it isn't part of any standard. It is also good to warn folks that polyfill/monkeypatched functions can break some code that assumes everything enumerable is theirs. – Jeremy J Starcher Sep 18 '12 at 19:06
  • 1
    a=["a", "b", "c"];a.move(0,1,1); // a = ["a", "b", "c"], should be ["b", "a", "c"] – Leonard Pauli Jul 15 '13 at 17:11
  • 1
    This feature is obsolete and may not supported any more. Be careful See: developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/… – Mostafa Mar 18 '18 at 12:45
2

I ended up combining two of these to work a little better when moving both small and large distances. I get fairly consistent results, but this could probably be tweaked a little bit by someone smarter than me to work differently for different sizes, etc.

Using some of the other methods when moving objects small distances was significantly faster (x10) than using splice. This might change depending on the array lengths though, but it is true for large arrays.

function ArrayMove(array, from, to) {
    if ( Math.abs(from - to) > 60) {
        array.splice(to, 0, array.splice(from, 1)[0]);
    } else {
        // works better when we are not moving things very far
        var target = array[from];
        var inc = (to - from) / Math.abs(to - from);
        var current = from;
        for (; current != to; current += inc) {
            array[current] = array[current + inc];
        }
        array[to] = target;    
    }
}

http://jsperf.com/arraymove-many-sizes

2

This version isn't ideal for all purposes, and not everyone likes comma expressions, but here's a one-liner that's a pure expression, creating a fresh copy:

const move = (from, to, ...a) => (a.splice(to, 0, ...a.splice(from, 1)), a)

A slightly performance-improved version returns the input array if no move is needed, it's still OK for immutable use, as the array won't change, and it's still a pure expression:

const move = (from, to, ...a) => 
    from === to 
    ? a 
    : (a.splice(to, 0, ...a.splice(from, 1)), a)

The invocation of either is

const shuffled = move(fromIndex, toIndex, ...list)

i.e. it relies on spreading to generate a fresh copy. Using a fixed arity 3 move would jeopardize either the single expression property, or the non-destructive nature, or the performance benefit of splice. Again, it's more of an example that meets some criteria than a suggestion for production use.

1

I used the nice answer of @Reid, but struggled with moving an element from the end of an array one step further - to the beginning (like in a loop). E.g. ['a', 'b', 'c'] should become ['c', 'a', 'b'] by calling .move(2,3)

I achieved this by changing the case for new_index >= this.length.

Array.prototype.move = function (old_index, new_index) {
        console.log(old_index + " " + new_index);
        while (old_index < 0) {
            old_index += this.length;
        }
        while (new_index < 0) {
            new_index += this.length;
        }
        if (new_index >= this.length) {
            new_index = new_index % this.length;
        }
        this.splice(new_index, 0, this.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
        return this; // for testing purposes
    };
1

It is stated in many places (adding custom functions into Array.prototype) playing with the Array prototype could be a bad idea, anyway I combined the best from various posts, I came with this, using modern Javascript:

    Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, 'immutableMove', {
        enumerable: false,
        value: function (old_index, new_index) {
            var copy = Object.assign([], this)
            if (new_index >= copy.length) {
                var k = new_index - copy.length;
                while ((k--) + 1) { copy.push(undefined); }
            }
            copy.splice(new_index, 0, copy.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
            return copy
        }
    });

    //how to use it
    myArray=[0, 1, 2, 3, 4];
    myArray=myArray.immutableMove(2, 4);
    console.log(myArray);
    //result: 0, 1, 3, 4, 2

Hope can be useful to anyone

1

As an addition to Reid's excellent answer (and because I cannot comment); You can use modulo to make both negative indices and too large indices "roll over":

function array_move(arr, old_index, new_index) {
  new_index =((new_index % arr.length) + arr.length) % arr.length;
  arr.splice(new_index, 0, arr.splice(old_index, 1)[0]);
  return arr; // for testing
}

// returns [2, 1, 3]
console.log(array_move([1, 2, 3], 0, 1)); 

  • Yes - since negative indices are supported, it seems sensible to wrap too-large indices rather than inserting undefined values, in my opinion. – python1981 Oct 18 '18 at 22:22
0
let ar = ['a', 'b', 'c', 'd'];

function change( old_array, old_index , new_index ){

  return old_array.map(( item , index, array )=>{
    if( index === old_index ) return array[ new_index ];
    else if( index === new_index ) return array[ old_index ];
    else return item;
  });

}

let result = change( ar, 0, 1 );

console.log( result );

result:

["b", "a", "c", "d"]
0

const move = (from, to, ...a) =>from === to ? a : (a.splice(to, 0, ...a.splice(from, 1)), a);
const moved = move(0, 2, ...['a', 'b', 'c']);
console.log(moved)

protected by Pankaj Parkar Oct 16 '15 at 14:01

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