187

this is my code:

print str(float(1/3))+'%'

and it shows:

0.0%

but I want to get 33%

What can I do?

  • 11
    int/int = int, int/float = float, flaot/int = float – AbiusX Mar 15 '11 at 2:18
  • 3
    Percent means per hundred. If you have a simple ratio (1/3 in your case), you have a per unit value that have to multiply it by 100 to get a percent value. See the other answers for the difference between integer and float division. – Apalala Mar 16 '11 at 14:08
  • FWIW, in Python 3.x print(str(float(1/3))+'%') will print 0.3333333333333333% — still not exactly what you want, but at least it's a bit closer. This is because division works differently in that version. – martineau Nov 8 '19 at 21:32
285

format supports a percentage floating point precision type:

>>> print "{0:.0%}".format(1./3)
33%

If you don't want integer division, you can import Python3's division from __future__:

>>> from __future__ import division
>>> 1 / 3
0.3333333333333333

# The above 33% example would could now be written without the explicit
# float conversion:
>>> print "{0:.0f}%".format(1/3 * 100)
33%

# Or even shorter using the format mini language:
>>> print "{:.0%}".format(1/3)
33%
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Is float(1) really more pythonic than 1.? – Tobias Kienzler Jul 17 '13 at 7:58
  • @TobiasKienzler, I do not know, if it's more pythonic. At least it is something you stumble over while reading the code. I think with Python 3 and real division by default this irritation is gone. – miku Jul 17 '13 at 8:19
  • Indeed. I wonder why Guido didn't implement real division from the very start... Rounding 1/3 to 0 should be explicit after all... – Tobias Kienzler Jul 17 '13 at 8:53
  • 1
    @TobiasKienzler Probably because in earlier times, Python was closer to C than nowadays. – glglgl Jul 17 '13 at 11:11
  • 14
    In Python 2, I'd use 1.0 instead of float(1) or 1.. IMHO it's less obtrusive than the former and not as subtle as the latter. – MestreLion Aug 15 '13 at 10:25
176

There is a way more convenient 'percent'-formatting option for the .format() format method:

>>> '{:.1%}'.format(1/3.0)
'33.3%'
| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    Is there a way to do this with old school "%.1f" formatting? – Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Mar 17 '15 at 23:28
  • 1
    Little bit "less convenient", but, yes! Like suggested above print("%.1f%%" % (100 * 1.0/3)) – user2489252 Mar 17 '15 at 23:32
  • 12
    This is the best answer because it doesn't require a multiplication by 100. Rather it takes advantage of the fact that format already knows how to print percentages! – blambert Aug 10 '16 at 17:24
  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer. This is much more Pythonic, using built-in capabilities to eliminate the meaningless implementation detail that a multiplication by 100 would be. – ksadowski May 28 '17 at 8:02
  • 2
    so in f-string style it will be f"{1/3.0:.1%}" – Kubas Feb 26 '19 at 13:58
68

Just for the sake of completeness, since I noticed no one suggested this simple approach:

>>> print("%.0f%%" % (100 * 1.0/3))
33%

Details:

  • %.0f stands for "print a float with 0 decimal places", so %.2f would print 33.33
  • %% prints a literal %. A bit cleaner than your original +'%'
  • 1.0 instead of 1 takes care of coercing the division to float, so no more 0.0
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    note: 100.0 * 1/3 -> ok, 100.0 * (1/3) -> 0.0 not ok – mpgn Feb 13 '15 at 23:05
  • @martialdidit: I'm aware of that, that's why my answer does not have parenthesis in 1/3. Evaluation order is intentional: 100.0 * 1 / 3 => 100.0 / 3 => 0.33... – MestreLion Feb 14 '15 at 16:08
  • In any case, I've moved the coercion from the 100 to the 1, to make things clear. – MestreLion Feb 14 '15 at 16:13
  • 2
    Beg your pardon, @RuggeroTurra? This is formatting, in the broad sense that it transforms an input to display as a string. Please note the OP never required the use of .format(), and %-formatting, also known as string interpolation in Python, is a perfectly valid alternative. – MestreLion Nov 21 '18 at 6:01
  • With % you are formatting a float to a string. Not a float to a percentage-string. The multiplication by 100 is done by hand, not by the %. I think the only correct solution which only uses formatting is with {:.0%} – Ruggero Turra Nov 21 '18 at 16:35
38

You are dividing integers then converting to float. Divide by floats instead.

As a bonus, use the awesome string formatting methods described here: http://docs.python.org/library/string.html#format-specification-mini-language

To specify a percent conversion and precision.

>>> float(1) / float(3)
[Out] 0.33333333333333331

>>> 1.0/3.0
[Out] 0.33333333333333331

>>> '{0:.0%}'.format(1.0/3.0) # use string formatting to specify precision
[Out] '33%'

>>> '{percent:.2%}'.format(percent=1.0/3.0)
[Out] '33.33%'

A great gem!

| improve this answer | |
19

Just to add Python 3 f-string solution

prob = 1.0/3.0
print(f"{prob:.0%}")
| improve this answer | |
5

Then you'd want to do this instead:

print str(int(1.0/3.0*100))+'%'

The .0 denotes them as floats and int() rounds them to integers afterwards again.

| improve this answer | |
  • i know this is from 2011 but ... int() does not round. e.g. int(1.9) != 2. Rounding can be done like so - round(1.9,0) == 2 – owns Apr 26 '16 at 18:12
  • int() certainly does round down the number. My example does exactly what I meant it to do; cutting off the digits since that's what the OP wanted. – Morten Kristensen Apr 27 '16 at 7:33
  • Stockoverflow is great - a couple of year and still a response. Thank you. However, for the sake of completeness, I want to clarify. int() drops the digits. It does not round down. Rounding implies it does something with the digits. The end result is the same though; in that sense, I see your point. Also, the OP does not clarify what he/she wants to do with the digits has 33.333... does round to 33. Thank you for responding to my comment and have a great day! – owns Apr 30 '16 at 15:43

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