7

I have a list like:

mylist = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]

I want to add some text to every other item so it looks like this:

mylist = ["1a", "2", "3a", "4", "5a"]

I wrote this, which works fine for every item. How do I make it apply only to every other item?

mylist2 = ["a" + item for item in mylist]
  • 3
    Should the "a" be before the number of after it? Your list comprehension does not match what you want. – Omkar Neogi Oct 30 '18 at 16:01
  • I would actually like to know how to put it on either side, but once I have one solution, I can try changing the order to move it. – Alligator Oct 30 '18 at 17:22
  • What is the difference between "every item" and "every other item"? – hellow Nov 19 '18 at 9:58
10

One way to do it would be this:

mylist = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]
res = [x + ('a' if i%2 == 0 else '') for i, x in enumerate(mylist)]

which results in:

['1a', '2', '3a', '4', '5a']

This approach takes advantage of the fact that the index of the terms you want to change when divided by 2 have a remainder of 1. See modulo

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    congrats for the answer. What I don't like about it is the fact that you're adding an empty string, instead of using the ternary on the whole expression. adding to an empty string can be avoided here – Jean-François Fabre Oct 30 '18 at 16:09
  • @Jean-FrançoisFabre Likewise. I also though about this but somehow reached the conclusion that it is equally fast\efficient. If this is not the case, I would be very curious and grateful to know why. – Ma0 Oct 30 '18 at 16:12
  • 1
    because x + '' will generate another string, instead of just using x. that's probably not noticeable on small lists. – Jean-François Fabre Oct 30 '18 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Jean-FrançoisFabre Interestingly enough though, x+'' is x returns True. – Ma0 Oct 30 '18 at 16:15
  • that's because of string interning. I think there's an optimization in the case you add to "". – Jean-François Fabre Oct 30 '18 at 16:16
10

Try This:

for i in range(0, len(mylist), 2):
    mylist[i] = mylist[i] + "a"

EDIT 1:

for i in range(0, len(mylist), 2):
    mylist[i] += "a"
| improve this answer | |
6

use enumerate and a modulo to test odd or even values with a ternary.

mylist = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]
mylist2 = [item if i%2 else "a" + item for i,item in enumerate(mylist)]

result:

>>> mylist2
['a1', '2', 'a3', '4', 'a5']

to get 1a, etc... just switch "a" + item by item + "a"

| improve this answer | |
  • The thing is that the list doesn't necessarily starts with an odd number... I'd rather use mylist2 = [item if not int(item)%2 else "a" + item for item in mylist] – Tony Pellerin Oct 31 '18 at 9:16
  • @TonyPellerin it's not about the values of the list, but the index of the elements. OP example is misleading. the list could be ['a','b','c'] – Jean-François Fabre Oct 31 '18 at 9:28
4

A bit weird solution, which makes use of iterators:

>>> from itertools import cycle
>>> mylist = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"]
>>> suffix = cycle(["a", ""])
>>> [l + s for l, s in zip(mylist, suffix)]
['1a', '2', '3a', '4', '5a']

EDIT

As suggested by Netwave in comments, here is the very-super-pythonic solution!

>>> import itertools, operator
>>> list(map(operator.add, mylist, itertools.cycle(("a", ""))))
['1a', '2', '3a', '4', '5a']
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    we like wierd here. – Jean-François Fabre Oct 30 '18 at 16:22
  • 1
    One more twist: map(operator.add, mylist, cycle(("a", ""))) – Netwave Oct 30 '18 at 17:16
  • 1
    @Netwave: SUPER-PYTHONIC solution! – Don Oct 30 '18 at 17:25
0

mylist = ["1", "2", "3", "4", "5"] text_list = [str(x) + 'a' if i % 2 == 0 else x for i, x in enumerate(mylist)]

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.