3

I had asked a question a few weeks ago about implementation of a non-blocking one parent-many child pipe, which was ably answered by @mob here

However, I've noticed that if a child posts more than one message before exiting, the parent only gets the first one if it reads a little later.

Example code:

use IO::Handle;
use POSIX ':sys_wait_h';
pipe(READER,WRITER);
WRITER->autoflush(1);

sub child_process {
    close READER;  # also a best but optional practice
    srand($$);
    my $id = 0;
        sleep 1 + 5*rand();
        $id++;
        print "Child Pid $$ sending message $id now...\n";
        print WRITER "$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 1\n";
        print WRITER "$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 2\n";
        exit 0;
}

if (fork() == 0) {
    child_process();
}

# parent
my ($rin,$rout) = ('');
vec($rin,fileno(READER),1) = 1;
while (1) {
     # non-blocking read on pipe
     my $read_avail = select($rout=$rin, undef, undef, 0.0);
     if ($read_avail < 0) {
         if (!$!{EINTR}) {
             warn "READ ERROR: $read_avail $!\n";
             last;
         }
     } elsif ($read_avail > 0) {
         chomp(my $line = <READER>);
         print "Parent Got $$: '$line'\n";
     } else {
            print STDERR "No input ... do other stuff\n";
     }
     sleep 5;
}
close WRITER;  # now it is safe to do this ...

Expected output:

I should get both messages.

What I get: Only the first message

No input ... do other stuff
No input ... do other stuff
Child Pid 8594 sending message 1 now...
Parent Got 8593: '1:Child Pid 8594 is sending this - Message 1'
No input ... do other stuff

This is supposed to be a non-blocking read, so home come it can't pick up the data on the next iteration? Is it because the child exited? I tried doing a while (chomp(my $line = <READER>)) in the parent, but that blocks, which I can't have.

  • Does it work any differently if you do an explicit close(WRITER); immediately before the exit 0; in child_process()? I don't think it'll make a difference, but... Also, shouldn't the parent close the WRITER handle after forking, rather than as it exits? You have a 'now it is safe to do this' comment after it in the parent, but it should be perfectly safe to do it immediately after the if containing the conditional call to child_process(). – Jonathan Leffler Oct 30 '18 at 21:04
  • @JonathanLeffler Tried playing with when to close, it doesn't help (but it does reveal weird behavior when there be shouldn't any) -- I think because of buffer-vs-non-buffered operation as mob explains. Also, the original parent code was creating other child processes here or there (got simplified for this question) and couldn't close WRITER early. – zdim Oct 30 '18 at 22:29
3

Looks like you are mixing buffered and unbuffered I/O. <READER> (and readline(READER)) are buffered input operations. The first time you call readline on a file handle, Perl will try to read up to 8K of data from the handle, saving most of it in a memory buffer. The next time you call readline on the same file handle, Perl will try to return data in the buffer before it tries to read more data from the file again. This is for efficiency.

select is an operation for unbuffered I/O. It tells you whether input is waiting on the file handle itself, but it can not see whether data is waiting in the buffer.

A clunky alternative would be to use sysread or getc to extract data from the pipe. That is inconvenient because you would have to break the input into separate lines yourself.

... if ($read_avail > 0) {
    my $n = sysread READER, my $lines, 16384;
    chomp($lines);
    my @lines = split /\n/, $lines;
    print "Parent Got $$: '$_'\n" for @lines;
} ...

What might work is to read from the file handle in list context.

chomp(my @lines = <READER>);
seek READER, 0, 1;

should read all available data from both the buffer and the filehandle, and in theory it will leave your buffer empty so the next <READER> call will be like an unbuffered read. (The seek statement clears the EOF condition on the filehandle so you can read from the filehandle later when more input arrives).

(ETA: nah, that won't work. That will just block on READER until the child closes its end of the pipe)


The docs for select have this warning

WARNING: One should not attempt to mix buffered I/O (like "read" or <FH>) with "select", except as permitted by POSIX, and even then only on POSIX systems. You have to use "sysread" instead.

  • Thank you. Actually this was the same code you posted in my first Q :-D. You are right, sys read is the solution (for the current problem). I've posted another answer. Reading in list context did not work, unfortunately – user1361529 Oct 31 '18 at 0:09
2

You are only reading up to one line per iteration, rather than reading all of the available data on the pipe. Perhaps select() is not indicating it's readable anymore after that. Note that since you're forking you also need to reap the subprocess with waitpid after it exits (in blocking mode waitpid will wait for it to exit), this will return the exit code of the child process.

I recommend using an event loop to manage pipes between processes as it and its helper modules will manage all of the weird details of both forking a process and exchanging data. Here's what something using IO::Async might look like.

use strict;
use warnings;
use IO::Async::Loop;
use IO::Async::Channel;
use IO::Async::Routine;

my $channel = IO::Async::Channel->new;

sub child_process {
    my $id = 0;
    sleep 1 + 5*rand();
    $id++;
    print "Child Pid $$ sending message $id now...\n";
    $channel->send(\"$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 1\n");
    $channel->send(\"$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 2\n");
}

my $loop = IO::Async::Loop->new;
my $f = $loop->new_future;
my $routine = IO::Async::Routine->new(
  channels_out => [$channel],
  code => \&child_process,
  on_return => sub { my $routine = shift; $f->done(@_) },
  on_die => sub { my $routine = shift; $f->fail(@_) },
);
$loop->add($routine);

$channel->configure(on_recv => sub {
  my ($channel, $ref) = @_;
  print "Parent Got: '$$ref'\n";
});

# wait for Future to complete (process finishes) or fail (process fails to start or dies)
my $exitcode = $f->get;
print "Child exited with exit code $exitcode\n";

Note that IO::Async::Channel is just an abstraction around IO::Async::Stream for sending data structures between processes, and IO::Async::Routine is an abstraction around IO::Async::Process (or a thread, on Windows systems) for setting up Channels to the forked code. IO::Async::Function additionally is a higher-level wrapper of IO::Async::Routine that can manage a fork/thread pool to run a subroutine many times with different input and receive the return values in the parent. So there are many levels you can make use of depending how deep you want to dive.

  • Thanks - I'm also going to try this framework out. I get the feeling I'm going to keep landing up with new issues as my needs expand. – user1361529 Oct 31 '18 at 0:09
  • 1
    @user1361529 The documentation is definitely lacking in a few places so if you need help the fastest way is straight from the author and experienced users on #io-async on irc.perl.org if you have IRC (or there's webchat). There's also the rarely-used io-async tag here... – Grinnz Oct 31 '18 at 0:37
1

Ok, I seem to see the benefit of @Grinnz's first recommendation to use a well defined framework. I thought I needed a tricycle but it looks like I'm slowly constructing a BMW from nuts and bolts.

@mob and @grinnz's suggestions were right. It was a case of buffer/vs/non buffer.

chomp(my @lines = <READER>);
seek READER, 0, 1;

does not work. It locks.

This cookbook recipe works, but I'll tweak it/test it further tomorrow (source). So far so good:

use IO::Handle;
use POSIX ':sys_wait_h';
use Symbol qw(qualify_to_ref);
use IO::Select;
pipe(READER,WRITER);
WRITER->autoflush(1);

sub sysreadline(*;$) {
    my($handle, $timeout) = @_;
    $handle = qualify_to_ref($handle, caller( ));
    my $infinitely_patient = (@_ == 1 || $timeout < 0);
    my $start_time = time( );
    my $selector = IO::Select->new( );
    $selector->add($handle);
    my $line = "";
SLEEP:
    until (at_eol($line)) {
        unless ($infinitely_patient) {
            return $line if time( ) > ($start_time + $timeout);
        }
        # sleep only 1 second before checking again
        next SLEEP unless $selector->can_read(1.0);
INPUT_READY:
        while ($selector->can_read(0.0)) {
            my $was_blocking = $handle->blocking(0);
CHAR:       while (sysread($handle, my $nextbyte, 1)) {
                $line .= $nextbyte;
                last CHAR if $nextbyte eq "\n";
            }
            $handle->blocking($was_blocking);
            # if incomplete line, keep trying
            next SLEEP unless at_eol($line);
            last INPUT_READY;
        }
    }
    return $line;
}
sub at_eol($) { $_[0] =~ /\n\z/ }

sub child_process {
    close READER;  # also a best but optional practice
    srand($$);
    my $id = 0;
        sleep 1 + 5*rand();
        $id++;
        print "Child Pid $$ sending message $id now...\n";
        print WRITER "$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 1\n";
        print WRITER "$id:Child Pid $$ is sending this - Message 2\n";
        exit 0;
}

if (fork() == 0) {
    child_process();
}

# parent
my ($rin,$rout) = ('');
vec($rin,fileno(READER),1) = 1;
while (1) {
     # non-blocking read on pipe
     while ((my $read_avail = select($rout=$rin, undef, undef, 0.0)) !=0) 
     {
        if ($read_avail < 0) {
                 if (!$!{EINTR}) {
                 warn "READ ERROR: $read_avail $!\n";
                last;
                }
        }
        elsif ($read_avail > 0) {
         chomp(my $line = sysreadline(READER));
         print "Parent Got $$: '$line'\n";
         print "END MESSAGE\n";
       }
     }
     print STDERR "input queue empty...\n";
     print "Sleeping main for 5...\n";
     sleep 5;
}
close WRITER;  # now it is safe to do this ...

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.