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I searched for this question on stackoverlflow but none the answers clarified my issue.

I am trying to do a uni-variate forecasting and I have manually written a dense layer at the end of my LSTM.

 weight = tf.Variable(tf.truncated_normal([config.lstm_size, config.input_size]))
 bias = tf.Variable(tf.constant(0.1, shape=[config.input_size]))

 prediction = tf.matmul(last, weight) + bias

Then I tried to add an activation to the result.

weight = tf.Variable(tf.truncated_normal([config.lstm_size, config.input_size]))
bias = tf.Variable(tf.constant(0.1, shape=[config.input_size]))

prediction = tf.nn.tanh(tf.matmul(last, weight) + bias)

Question: Is this the same as adding a tf.layers.dense() or a tf.contrib.layers.fully_connected()?

hidden = tf.layers.dense(last, units=1, activation=tf.nn.relu)

or

tf.contrib.layers.fully_connected(last, num_outputs=1, activation_fn=tf.nn.relu)

Question: If I do something like:

hidden = tf.layers.dense(last, units=1, activation=tf.nn.relu)

prediction = tf.contrib.layers.fully_connected(hidden, num_outputs=1, activation_fn=tf.nn.relu)

Does that mean I have two dense layers?

Thank you in advance!

  • 2
    About 1) essentially yes, but note that to get the exact same behavior you need to use the same activation, initilization, regularization... 2) Yes, those would be two layers, although the last one will have one input and one output, so probably won't do that much... (btw ReLU activation has good properties for hidden layers but it is rarely useful for the output layer) About the title question, both are pretty much the same, but tf.layers is part of the official, stable API while tf.contrib.layers is an experimental, maybe not so supported one, so the first is preferable in principle. – jdehesa Oct 31 '18 at 9:55

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