5

I want to perform a specific operation. Namely, from a matrix:

A = np.array([[1,2],
            [3,4]])

To the following

B = np.array([[1, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0],
              [0, 1, 0, 0, 2, 0],
              [0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 2],
              [3, 0, 0, 4, 0, 0],
              [0, 3, 0, 0, 4, 0],
              [0, 0, 3, 0, 0, 4]])

Or in words: multiply every entry by the identity matrix and keep the same order. Now I have accomplished this by using numpy, using the following code. Here N and M are the dimensions of the starting matrix, and the dimension of the identity matrix.

l_slice = 3
n_slice = 2
A = np.reshape(np.arange(1, 1+N ** 2), (N, N))
B = np.array([i * np.eye(M) for i in A.flatten()])
C = B.reshape(N, N, M, M).reshape(N, N * M, M).transpose([0, 2, 1]).reshape((N * M, N * M))

where C has my desired properties.

But now I want do this modification in Keras/Tensorflow, where the matrix A is the outcome of one of my layers.

However, I am not sure yet if I will be able to properly create matrix B. Especially when batches are involved, I think I will somehow mess up the dimensions of my problem. Can anyone with more Keras/Tensorflow experience comment on this 'reshape' and how he/she sees this happening within Keras/Tensorflow?

2

Here is a way to do that with TensorFlow:

import tensorflow as tf

data = tf.placeholder(tf.float32, [None, None])
n = tf.placeholder(tf.int32, [])
eye = tf.eye(n)
mult = data[:, tf.newaxis, :, tf.newaxis] * eye[tf.newaxis, :, tf.newaxis, :]
result = tf.reshape(mult, n * tf.shape(data))
with tf.Session() as sess:
    a = sess.run(result, feed_dict={data: [[1, 2], [3, 4]], n: 3})
    print(a)

Output:

[[1. 0. 0. 2. 0. 0.]
 [0. 1. 0. 0. 2. 0.]
 [0. 0. 1. 0. 0. 2.]
 [3. 0. 0. 4. 0. 0.]
 [0. 3. 0. 0. 4. 0.]
 [0. 0. 3. 0. 0. 4.]]

By the way, you can do basically the same in NumPy, which should be faster than your current solution:

import numpy as np

data = np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4]])
n = 3
eye = np.eye(n)
mult = data[:, np.newaxis, :, np.newaxis] * eye[np.newaxis, :, np.newaxis, :]
result = np.reshape(mult, (n * data.shape[0], n * data.shape[1]))
print(result)
# The output is the same as above

EDIT:

I'll try to give some intuition about why/how this works, sorry if it's too long. It is not that hard but I think it's sort of tricky to explain. Maybe it is easier to see how the following multiplication works

import numpy as np

data = np.array([[1, 2], [3, 4]])
n = 3
eye = np.eye(n)
mult1 = data[:, :, np.newaxis, np.newaxis] * eye[np.newaxis, np.newaxis, :, :]

Now, mult1 is a sort of "matrix of matrices". If I give two indices, I will get the diagonal matrix for the corresponding element in the original one:

print(mult1[0, 0])
# [[1. 0. 0.]
#  [0. 1. 0.]
#  [0. 0. 1.]]

So you could say this matrix could be visualize like this:

| 1 0 0 |  | 2 0 0 |
| 0 1 0 |  | 0 2 0 |
| 0 0 1 |  | 0 0 2 |

| 3 0 0 |  | 4 0 0 |
| 0 3 0 |  | 0 4 0 |
| 0 0 3 |  | 0 0 4 |

However this is deceiving, because if you try to reshape this to the final shape the result is not the right one:

print(np.reshape(mult1, (n * data.shape[0], n * data.shape[1])))
# [[1. 0. 0. 0. 1. 0.]
#  [0. 0. 1. 2. 0. 0.]
#  [0. 2. 0. 0. 0. 2.]
#  [3. 0. 0. 0. 3. 0.]
#  [0. 0. 3. 4. 0. 0.]
#  [0. 4. 0. 0. 0. 4.]]

The reason is that reshaping (conceptually) "flattens" the array first and then gives the new shape. But the flattened array in this case is not what you need:

print(mult1.ravel())
# [1. 0. 0. 0. 1. 0. 0. 0. 1. 2. 0. 0. 0. 2. 0. ...

You see, it first traverses the first submatrix, then the second, etc. What you want though is for it to traverse first the first row of the first submatrix, then the first row of the second submatrix, then second row of first submatrix, etc. So basically you want something like:

  • Take the first two submatrices (the ones with 1 and 2)
    • Take all the first rows ([1, 0, 0] and [2, 0, 0]).
      • Take the first of these ([1, 0, 0])
        • Take each of its elements (1, 0 and 0).

And then continue for the rest. So if you think about it, we traversing first the axis 0 (row of "matrix of matrices"), then 2 (rows of each submatrix), then 1 (column of "matrix of matrices") and finally 3 (columns of submatrices). So we can just reorder the axis to do that:

mult2 = mult1.transpose((0, 2, 1, 3))
print(np.reshape(mult2, (n * data.shape[0], n * data.shape[1])))
# [[1. 0. 0. 2. 0. 0.]
#  [0. 1. 0. 0. 2. 0.]
#  [0. 0. 1. 0. 0. 2.]
#  [3. 0. 0. 4. 0. 0.]
#  [0. 3. 0. 0. 4. 0.]
#  [0. 0. 3. 0. 0. 4.]]

And it works! So in the solution I posted, to avoid the tranposing, I just make the multiplication so the order of the axes is exactly that:

mult = data[
        :,           # Matrix-of-matrices rows
        np.newaxis,  # Submatrix rows
        :,           # Matrix-of-matrices columns
        np.newaxis   # Submatrix columns
    ] * eye[
        np.newaxis,  # Matrix-of-matrices rows
        :,           # Submatrix rows
        np.newaxis,  # Matrix-of-matrices columns
        :            # Submatrix columns
    ]

I hope that makes it slightly clearer. To be honest, in this case in particular I could came up with the solution quickly because I had to solve a similar problem not too long ago, and I guess you end up building an intuition of these things.

  • Ah yes, in my mind I knew it should be something like this. But I didnt think of the solution by using the np.newaxis in this way. Thanks! – zwep Oct 31 '18 at 14:50
  • just one sub-question... can you somehow explain the way you came up with this way of doing the matrix multiplication? Because I cant seem to "visualize" the solution in my head.. so that means I dont understand the solution fully – zwep Oct 31 '18 at 15:37
  • 1
    @zwep I have added some explanation, I hope that helps. – jdehesa Oct 31 '18 at 16:24
  • Ah yes, thanks a lot, especially the part on how you interpret the axis of the 4d array. The speed with which you replied also startled me, so thanks for the last note, haha. – zwep Oct 31 '18 at 21:38
  • Last note (as far as I know now..) in order to deal properly with the batch dimension, I used tf.expand_dims() on the created identity matrix. AFAIK using tf.newaxis should produce a similar result, but this one was suggested to use when dealing with the variable batch dimension. – zwep Oct 31 '18 at 22:29
2

Another way to achieve the same effect in numpy is to use the following:

A = np.array([[1,2],
            [3,4]])
B = np.repeat(np.repeat(A, 3, axis=0), 3, axis=1) * np.tile(np.eye(3), (2,2))

Then, to replicate it in tensorflow, we can use tf.tile, but there is no tf.repeat, however someone has provided this function on tensorflow tracker.

def tf_repeat(tensor, repeats):
    """
    Args:

    input: A Tensor. 1-D or higher.
    repeats: A list. Number of repeat for each dimension, length must be the same as the number of dimensions in input

    Returns:

    A Tensor. Has the same type as input. Has the shape of tensor.shape * repeats
    """
    with tf.variable_scope("repeat"):
        expanded_tensor = tf.expand_dims(tensor, -1)
        multiples = [1] + list(repeats)
        tiled_tensor = tf.tile(expanded_tensor, multiples=multiples)
        repeated_tesnor = tf.reshape(tiled_tensor, tf.shape(tensor) * repeats)
    return repeated_tesnor

and thus the tensorflow implementation will look like the following. Here I also consider that the first dimension represents batches, and thus we do not operate on it.

N = 2
M = 3
nbatch = 2
Ain = np.reshape(np.arange(1, 1 + N*N*nbatch), (nbatch, N, N))

A = tf.placeholder(tf.float32, shape=(nbatch, N, N))
B = tf.tile(tf.eye(M), [N, N]) * tf_repeat(A, [1, M, M])

with tf.Session() as sess:
    print(sess.run(C, feed_dict={A: Ain}))

and the result:

 [[[1. 0. 0. 2. 0. 0.]
  [0. 1. 0. 0. 2. 0.]
  [0. 0. 1. 0. 0. 2.]
  [3. 0. 0. 4. 0. 0.]
  [0. 3. 0. 0. 4. 0.]
  [0. 0. 3. 0. 0. 4.]]

 [[5. 0. 0. 6. 0. 0.]
  [0. 5. 0. 0. 6. 0.]
  [0. 0. 5. 0. 0. 6.]
  [7. 0. 0. 8. 0. 0.]
  [0. 7. 0. 0. 8. 0.]
  [0. 0. 7. 0. 0. 8.]]]
  • Ah thanks, yeah since I couldnt find the repeat function in tensorflow I wanted to have a solution without it. But good to know that there is an implementation of it! – zwep Oct 31 '18 at 14:49

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