62

I don't understand why is when I use setTimeout function my react component start to infinite console.log. Everything is working, but PC start to lag as hell. Some people saying that function in timeout changing my state and that rerender component, that sets new timer and so on. Now I need to understand how to clear it's right.

export default function Loading() {
  // if data fetching is slow, after 1 sec i will show some loading animation
  const [showLoading, setShowLoading] = useState(true)
  let timer1 = setTimeout(() => setShowLoading(true), 1000)

  console.log('this message will render  every second')
  return 1
}

Clear in different version of code not helping to:

const [showLoading, setShowLoading] = useState(true)
  let timer1 = setTimeout(() => setShowLoading(true), 1000)
  useEffect(
    () => {
      return () => {
        clearTimeout(timer1)
      }
    },
    [showLoading]
  )
  • Can you share the code of useState and setShowLoading – Hemadri Dasari Oct 31 '18 at 19:12
  • @Think-Twice useState is a proposed update to ReactJS's API – Mark C. Oct 31 '18 at 19:14
  • @MarkC. Thank you I didn't know about it as I am not working on react currently. I think OP has to use setTimeout than using setInterval for showing loader – Hemadri Dasari Oct 31 '18 at 19:16
  • i was able to shorten my code. – ZiiMakc Oct 31 '18 at 19:24
  • 1
    @RTWTMI try with setTimeout method instead of setInterval. because what happens in your code is that setInterval triggeres for every one second you doing setState every second which you are not suppose to do in react and that's why you get that error – Hemadri Dasari Oct 31 '18 at 19:26
108

Return function in useEffect runs every time useEffect runs (except first run on component mount). Think about it as every time there is new useEffect execution, the old one get deleted.

This is a working way to use and clear timeouts or intervals:

export default function Loading() {   
     const [showLoading, setShowLoading] = useState(false)
      
     useEffect(
        () => {
          let timer1 = setTimeout(() => setShowLoading(null), 1000)
    
          // this will clear Timeout when component unmount like in willComponentUnmount
          return () => {
            clearTimeout(timer1)
          }
        },
        [] //useEffect will run only one time
           //if you pass a value to array, like this [data] than clearTimeout will run every time this value changes (useEffect re-run)
      )

 return showLoading && <div>I will be visible after ~1000ms</div>
}

If you need to clear timeouts or intervals somewhere outside:

export default function Loading() {   
     const [showLoading, setShowLoading] = useState(false)
      
     const timerToClearSomewhere = useRef(null) //now you can pass timer to another component

     useEffect(
        () => {
          timerToClearSomewhere.current = setInterval(() => setShowLoading(true), 50000)
    
          return () => {
            clearInterval(timerToClearSomewhere.current)
          }
        },
        []
      )

  //here we can imitate clear from somewhere else place
  useEffect(() => {
    setTimeout(() => clearInterval(timerToClearSomewhere.current), 1000)
  }, [])

 return showLoading ? <div>I will never be visible because interval was cleared</div> : <div>showLoading is false</div>
}

Article from Dan Abramov.

| improve this answer | |
  • 4
    What if you need to reset the timer both "on unmounting" and when some state changes? Would you set up two hooks, one with an empty array and one with the relevant state variable? – loopmode Feb 18 '19 at 12:34
  • 2
    @loopmode i think you can just add clearTimeout(timer1) in code where state changes, but you will need then to save your timer1 in useState variable. – ZiiMakc Feb 18 '19 at 15:58
  • Is there no risk of race condition? I always check if the return in useEffect has been called just in case before trying to set a state variable. – Jón Trausti Arason Mar 4 '19 at 9:26
  • @raRaRar return called on component unmount, what condition are you talking about? – ZiiMakc Mar 4 '19 at 10:49
  • 1
    This was helpful, as was this post from Dan Abramov himself here overreacted.io/making-setinterval-declarative-with-react-hooks linked by stackoverflow.com/a/59274757/470749 And here is a TypeScript version of useInterval: gist.github.com/Danziger/… – Ryan Sep 29 at 17:19
14

The problem is you are calling setTimeout outside useEffect, so you are setting a new timeout every time the component is rendered, which will eventually be invoked again and change the state, forcing the component to re-render again, which will set a new time, which...

So, as you have already found out, the way to use setTimeout or setInterval with hooks is to wrap them in useEffect, like so:

React.useEffect(() => {
    const timeoutID = window.setTimeout(() => {
        ...
    }, 1000);

    return () => window.clearTimeout(timeoutID );
}, []);

As deps = [], useEffect's callback will only be called once. Then, the callback you return will be called when the component is unmounted.

Anyway, I would encourage you to create your own useTimeout hook so that you can DRY and simplify your code by using setTimeout declaratively, as Dan Abramov suggests for setInterval in Making setInterval Declarative with React Hooks, which is quite similar:

function useTimeout(callback, delay) {
  const timeoutRef = React.useRef();
  const callbackRef = React.useRef(callback);

  // Remember the latest callback:
  //
  // Without this, if you change the callback, when setTimeout kicks in, it
  // will still call your old callback.
  //
  // If you add `callback` to useEffect's deps, it will work fine but the
  // timeout will be reset.

  React.useEffect(() => {
    callbackRef.current = callback;
  }, [callback]);

  // Set up the timeout:

  React.useEffect(() => {
    if (typeof delay === 'number') {
      timeoutRef.current = window.setTimeout(() => callbackRef.current(), delay);

      // Clear timeout if the components is unmounted or the delay changes:
      return () => window.clearTimeout(timeoutRef.current);
    }
  }, [delay]);

  // In case you want to manually clear the timeout from the consuming component...:
  return timeoutRef;
}

const App = () => {
  const [isLoading, setLoading] = React.useState(true);
  const [showLoader, setShowLoader] = React.useState(false);
  
  // Simulate loading some data:
  const fakeNetworkRequest = React.useCallback(() => {
    setLoading(true);
    setShowLoader(false);
    
    // 50% of the time it will display the loder, and 50% of the time it won't:
    window.setTimeout(() => setLoading(false), Math.random() * 4000);
  }, []);
  
  // Initial data load:
  React.useEffect(fakeNetworkRequest, []);
        
  // After 2 second, we want to show a loader:
  useTimeout(() => setShowLoader(true), isLoading ? 2000 : null);

  return (<React.Fragment>
    <button onClick={ fakeNetworkRequest } disabled={ isLoading }>
      { isLoading ? 'LOADING... πŸ“€' : 'LOAD MORE πŸš€' }
    </button>
    
    { isLoading && showLoader ? <div className="loader"><span className="loaderIcon">πŸ“€</span></div> : null }
    { isLoading ? null : <p>Loaded! ✨</p> }
  </React.Fragment>);
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.querySelector('#app'));
body,
button {
  font-family: monospace;
}

body, p {
  margin: 0;
}

#app {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  align-items: center;
  min-height: 100vh;
}

button {
  margin: 32px 0;
  padding: 8px;
  border: 2px solid black;
  background: transparent;
  cursor: pointer;
  border-radius: 2px;
}

.loader {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100vh;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  font-size: 128px;
  background: white;
}

.loaderIcon {
  animation: spin linear infinite .25s;
}

@keyframes spin {
  from { transform:rotate(0deg) }
  to { transform:rotate(360deg) }
}
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

Apart from producing simpler and cleaner code, this allows you to automatically clear the timeout by passing delay = null and also returns the timeout ID, in case you want to cancel it yourself manually (that's not covered in Dan's posts).

If you are looking for a similar answer for setInterval rather than setTimeout, check this out: https://stackoverflow.com/a/59274004/3723993.

You can also find declarative version of setTimeout and setInterval, useTimeout and useInterval, plus a custom useThrottledCallback hook written in TypeScript in https://gist.github.com/Danziger/336e75b6675223ad805a88c2dfdcfd4a.

| improve this answer | |
  • @mystrdat This ☝️ might answer your question about how to clear the timer on some props change. In this example, simply use those props to either pass a delay or null to useInterval. If you pass null, the timeout will be cleared for you. – Danziger Dec 10 '19 at 20:21
  • @loopmode Same for you. This ☝️ might answer your question regarding clearing the timer when some props change. – Danziger Dec 10 '19 at 20:23
6

Your computer was lagging because you probably forgot to pass in the empty array as the second argument of useEffect and was triggering a setState within the callback. That causes an infinite loop because useEffect is triggered on renders.

Here's a working way to set a timer on mount and clearing it on unmount:

function App() {
  React.useEffect(() => {
    const timer = window.setInterval(() => {
      console.log('1 second has passed');
    }, 1000);
    return () => { // Return callback to run on unmount.
      window.clearInterval(timer);
    };
  }, []); // Pass in empty array to run useEffect only on mount.

  return (
    <div>
      Timer Example
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <div>
    <App />
  </div>,
  document.querySelector("#app")
);
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    How would you deal with clearing the timeout when you need to run the effect on some prop change often, but run only one active timer and clear it on unmount? – mystrdat May 16 '19 at 12:20
0

function useTimeout(callback, delay) {
  const timeoutRef = React.useRef();
  const callbackRef = React.useRef(callback);

  // Remember the latest callback:
  //
  // Without this, if you change the callback, when setTimeout kicks in, it
  // will still call your old callback.
  //
  // If you add `callback` to useEffect's deps, it will work fine but the
  // timeout will be reset.

  React.useEffect(() => {
    callbackRef.current = callback;
  }, [callback]);

  // Set up the timeout:

  React.useEffect(() => {
    if (typeof delay === 'number') {
      timeoutRef.current = window.setTimeout(() => callbackRef.current(), delay);

      // Clear timeout if the components is unmounted or the delay changes:
      return () => window.clearTimeout(timeoutRef.current);
    }
  }, [delay]);

  // In case you want to manually clear the timeout from the consuming component...:
  return timeoutRef;
}

const App = () => {
  const [isLoading, setLoading] = React.useState(true);
  const [showLoader, setShowLoader] = React.useState(false);
  
  // Simulate loading some data:
  const fakeNetworkRequest = React.useCallback(() => {
    setLoading(true);
    setShowLoader(false);
    
    // 50% of the time it will display the loder, and 50% of the time it won't:
    window.setTimeout(() => setLoading(false), Math.random() * 4000);
  }, []);
  
  // Initial data load:
  React.useEffect(fakeNetworkRequest, []);
        
  // After 2 second, we want to show a loader:
  useTimeout(() => setShowLoader(true), isLoading ? 2000 : null);

  return (<React.Fragment>
    <button onClick={ fakeNetworkRequest } disabled={ isLoading }>
      { isLoading ? 'LOADING... πŸ“€' : 'LOAD MORE πŸš€' }
    </button>
    
    { isLoading && showLoader ? <div className="loader"><span className="loaderIcon">πŸ“€</span></div> : null }
    { isLoading ? null : <p>Loaded! ✨</p> }
  </React.Fragment>);
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.querySelector('#app'));
body,
button {
  font-family: monospace;
}

body, p {
  margin: 0;
}

#app {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: column;
  align-items: center;
  min-height: 100vh;
}

button {
  margin: 32px 0;
  padding: 8px;
  border: 2px solid black;
  background: transparent;
  cursor: pointer;
  border-radius: 2px;
}

.loader {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100vh;
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  font-size: 128px;
  background: white;
}

.loaderIcon {
  animation: spin linear infinite .25s;
}

@keyframes spin {
  from { transform:rotate(0deg) }
  to { transform:rotate(360deg) }
}
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

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