0

I use Rust to call a C function with a loop (for or while), which uses printf function to display something, but the C function doesn't display any output from printf.

C code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void print_c() {
  int s = 3;
  while (1) {
    printf("%d\n", s);
    sleep(1);
  }
}

However, when using C++, output is successfully generated.

C++ code:

#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <unistd.h>

extern "C" {
  int print_it(int32_t num) {
    while (1) {
        std::cout << num << std::endl;
        sleep(1);
    }
  }
}

C is packaged as a shared library named "cthread". C++ is named "cppthread".

This is the Rust calling the C library:

#[link(name = "cthread")]
extern "C" {
    fn print_c();
}

fn main() {
    unsafe { print_c() };
}

And the Rust calling the C++ library:

#[link(name = "cppthread")]
extern "C" {
    fn print_it();
}

fn main() {
    unsafe { print_it() };
}
7
  • What do you mean "stop being unusable" ...? Nov 1, 2018 at 3:24
  • What you say don't make any sense
    – Stargateur
    Nov 1, 2018 at 3:26
  • sorry,my description is wrong, it should be loop can't display the contents of printf. Nov 1, 2018 at 3:28
  • 1
    Also I think you should include your rust code. Read minimal reproducible example.
    – Stargateur
    Nov 1, 2018 at 3:41
  • 3
    Just a wild guess because there's no verifiable example. Besides the parameter and return type, the biggest difference is that the C version does not flush stdout. The C++ version uses std::endl, which has an implicit flush to stdout (that is the reason the use of std::endl is discouraged). Forcing a similar flush in the C version with a fflush(stdout) might be the cause.
    – Dan N
    Nov 1, 2018 at 4:45

2 Answers 2

3

Your C and C++ versions are not equivalent.

Your C version just prints a number and a newline. It does no explicit flushing (which is then left up to various layers of the I/O stack to decide when to do — almost certainly, given your sleep(1), this will take some time!).

Your C++ version prints a number, then (via endl) both prints a newline and flushes. That's why you always see the result straight away.

os << endl is os << '\n' << flush.

Making your C version do this as well is easy, using fflush:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void print_c() {
  int s = 3;
  while (1) {
    printf("%d\n", s);
    fflush(STDOUT);
    sleep(1);
  }
}

This problem has nothing to do with Rust.

2

I tried your C version and it worked for me in macOS. As you did not tell us your operating system, it's hard to know if it's something platform specific. Try adding a fflush(stdout) after your printf.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void print_c() {
  int s = 3;
  while (1) {
    printf("%d\n", s);
    fflush(stdout); // This makes sure stdout is not being buffered.
    sleep(1);
  }
}

As for your C++ version, it has its own problems in the Rust code.

Since your C++ version returns an int, and takes an int as a parameter. You need to define your extern definition to show that. Since you actually take an int32_t, I used the i32 for the type. But you return an int (note: you don't actually return anything in your code)., and because the size of an int can be different on different platform, it's best to use the libc::c_int

extern crate libc;
use libc::c_int;

#[link(name = "cppthread")]
extern {
    fn print_c(num: i32) -> c_int;
}

fn main() {
    unsafe { print_c(10) };
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.