16

Assume I have a list.

temp = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B']

I am looking for a way to join the count of the string inside.

Intended Output:

['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']

I was able to solve it by using a list comprehension but I am looking for a way where I don't have to specify the list [1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3]. Is it possible?

[j + "_" + str(i) for i, j in zip([1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3], temp)]
28

You can use collections.defaultdict with a for loop:

from collections import defaultdict

L = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B']

dd = defaultdict(int)

res = []
for item in L:
    dd[item] += 1
    res.append(f'{item}_{dd[item]}')

print(res)

['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']
  • 1
    Thank you :). Is it possible to write this in a list comprehension? – Rakesh Nov 1 '18 at 10:26
  • @Rakesh yes, but only using very ugly side effects. – timgeb Nov 1 '18 at 10:26
  • 6
    You would have to use boolean expressions inside the comprehension where the evaluation of the truthyness of its parts also calls methods like __setitem__. Trust me, you don't want a listcomp here. – timgeb Nov 1 '18 at 10:29
  • 2
    Agree with @timgeb here, a list comprehension would work if you pre-calculated the index values (which would be overly expensive). But not when you need to calculate them based on prior values. – jpp Nov 1 '18 at 10:33
  • 4
    @timgeb: in fact you can do it with just a list comprehension, without using side effects quite as nasty as the ones you mention - see my answer for one way of doing so. I'm still not 100% sure I'd recommend doing it, though :) – psmears Nov 1 '18 at 13:44
11

You can use a Counter or a defaultdict(int) to keep track of how many times a character has been seen as you encounter them.

>>> from collections import Counter
>>> 
>>> temp = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B']
>>> seen = Counter()
>>> 
>>> result = []
>>> for c in temp:
...:    seen.update(c)
...:    result.append('{}_{}'.format(c, seen[c]))
...:    
>>> result
>>> ['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']

Note that seen.update(c) might have unexpected results if you expect strings with more than one character in temp. Demo:

>>> seen = Counter()
>>> seen.update('ABC')
>>> seen
>>> Counter({'A': 1, 'B': 1, 'C': 1})

Depending on how you want to count and what kind of data you expect, you might want to use the line

seen[c] += 1

instead of

seen.update(c)

Alternatively, without any imports:

>>> seen = {}
>>> result = []
>>> 
>>> for c in temp:
...:    seen[c] = seen.get(c, 0) + 1
...:    result.append('{}_{}'.format(c, seen[c]))
...:    
>>> result
>>> ['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']
4

You can use a dictionary (or better yet, a collections.defaultdict) to maintain the counts for each item:

from collections import defaultdict

lst = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B']
lst2 = []
d = defaultdict(int)

for item in lst:
    d[item] += 1
    lst2.append('{}_{}'.format(item, d[item]))

print(lst2)  # ['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']

To use a list comprehension here you'd need some way to update state (i.e. the counters) for each item as you iterate the original list. For that you could use a function with a default argument, e.g.:

def get_count(item, d=defaultdict(int)):
    d[item] += 1
    return '{}_{}'.format(item, d[item])

lst2 = [get_count(item) for item in lst]
print(lst2)  # ['A_1', 'B_1', 'A_2', 'B_2', 'A_3', 'B_3']
4

It is in fact possible (as OP has asked in some of the comments) to do this with just a list comprehension, without too many undesirable side effects. I'm not sure whether this is necessarily a good idea though - some people may not find it the easiest code to understand:

from collections import defaultdict
import itertools

temp = ['A', 'B', 'A', 'B', 'A', 'B']

result = [j + "_" + str(next(c[j]))
          for c in [defaultdict(itertools.count)]
          for j in temp]
  • nice, but I agree, the loop is more readable here. and may be more performant too. – Baldrickk Nov 1 '18 at 13:53
  • 4
    @Baldrickk: Yep, I'm not advocating using this, at least without serious consideration first! And if high performance is a requirement, always measure :) – psmears Nov 1 '18 at 13:55
  • 1
    For Python 3 you should replace the next() method call with the next() function. And that also works with Python 2 then, so it's the better, because more portable solution. – BlackJack Nov 1 '18 at 15:40
  • 3
    @BlackJack: Good point, edited - thanks :) – psmears Nov 1 '18 at 21:24

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