11

I created java file in IntelliJ IDE, with that code

import java.awt.AWTException;
import java.awt.MouseInfo;
import java.awt.Robot;

public class JavaRobotExample {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 12,
                y = 300;
        try {
            Robot robot = new Robot();
            robot.mouseMove(x, y);

            int xAct = (int)    MouseInfo.getPointerInfo().getLocation().getX(),
                    yAct = (int) MouseInfo.getPointerInfo().getLocation().getY();

            String sPred = String.format("Predicted mouse location : %, d, %, d", x, y),
                    sAct = String.format("Actual mouse location : %, d, %, d", xAct, yAct);

            System.out.println(sPred);
            System.out.println(sAct);
        } catch (AWTException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

That example works fine in Windows 7 environment, but the same code on Mac OS 10.14 doesn't move mouse using method mouseMove (but reads position with MouseInfo class).

Also I don't receive any Exception e.g.

Did someone had earlier similar problem? Any ideas how to get that code to work in Mac OS?

Best Regards,

4
  • You're going to have to be more specific with "it doesnt work". What does the console say when you run it?/what is it supposed to say? Also more to the point how are you running it?
    – scigs
    Nov 1 '18 at 15:13
  • Hi, so in console I receive only these two lines (example from Mac): "Predicted mouse location : 12, 300" and "Actual mouse location : 730, 428" - what is correct, because the second line shows mouse position (because mouse does not change position for some reason). In Windows 7 I can see the same values in both lines (because predicted mouse position is equal to actual position after mouse moved). Do I need to provide something more? Thanks for reply
    – R.edd
    Nov 1 '18 at 17:20
  • I ran your code with JDK 1.8 and the actual and predicted do not match, but my mouse cursor was moved to the correct location. The same code with JDK 11 works.
    – Jason
    Apr 4 '20 at 17:54
  • The code example will not always work. For it to work reliably, there needs to be a SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait used to get the MouseInfo.
    – Jason
    Apr 6 '20 at 15:49
22

I'm having the same exact issue too. I have a statement "robot.mouseMove(100, 100);" and the mouse doesn't move at all. I have an idea to research. I noticed a warning or informational type of message from MacOS while I was running my code. It was asking me something about giving permission for my program to control the screen or system or something. I tried to click the "allow" checkbox, but it wouldn't let me. I'll research this some more. I think it's a MacOS thing. You (and I) have to tell MacOS that it's ok for our Java program to control the mouse.

I think this is the solution . . .

In System Preferences (the "gear" icon), under Security & Privacy, click the Privacy tab toward the top, then choose Accessibility on the left. This lists all the programs that can "control your computer". I'm using STS, not IntelliJ. I see STS listed along with BetterSnapTool and KeyCastr. Both BetterSnapTool and KeyCastr are checked. STS is not checked. And, all of these are grayed out so that I can't change any of the checks. There's a Lock icon at the bottom left of the window. I clicked on the icon, and a prompt came up asking for my password (I have some level of sysadmin privileges). I put in my password, and I am now allowed to "check" STS. I "checked" STS (you will "check" IntelliJ). After "checking" STS, I clicked the Lock icon at the bottom left again. This "closed" the lock. Now when I run my program, the robot command moves my mouse.

7
  • I already had IntelliJ in the list of authorized apps for "Accessibility". And I'm also having the problem where my Java app, launched within IntelliJ, cannot move the mouse. I wonder if the JVM must be the same for my app and IntelliJ. This is not currently the case.
    – Jason
    Apr 4 '20 at 17:43
  • So indeed, each JVM that needs to run the above code must be given permission using the method described here. IntelliJ embeds a JVM, but I don't use that JVM to compile and run code. I use Gradle which launches yet another JVM. In addition, Gradle has a daemon worker which must be restart after giving the JVM permission. Note: when I say "JVM" I mean the java command.
    – Jason
    Apr 4 '20 at 18:43
  • Ok, it's worse than my previous comment. I had java for JDK 11.0.6 in the list of permitted apps and things still did not work. To resolve the problem I had to remove IntelliJ and all java commands from the list of permitted apps (remove, not uncheck). Then I had to run my program using gradle on the command line (not in IntelliJ). Doing so gave a macOS window prompting for security permissions. I clicked "Open System Preferences" and java was there. I checked it. Now it works. This java is the same as I added earlier manually and did not work. I verified this with "Open in Finder".
    – Jason
    Apr 6 '20 at 15:31
  • The above method also made things work when running from IntelliJ.
    – Jason
    Apr 6 '20 at 15:31
  • I'm still having difficulties with this. Every once in a while I have to remove IntelliJ and all "java" entries from "Accessibility" under "Privacy" in System Preferences and then run gradle from the command line to provoke macOS to prompt me to allow. Then everything works after that for a while. Very strange.
    – Jason
    Apr 28 '20 at 0:55
0

The answer is "you can" and "you can't". Let's start with the "can't".

Can't:

It seems macOS incorrectly detects the attempt to move the mouse as coming from IntelliJ, when in fact, it's coming from java. You can give IntelliJ all the permissions you want, but java will never be able to move the cursor when the permissions are given to IntelliJ.

IntelliJ (which is a Java application) is running a child process to start your program. The child process is the java command line and not the same java as is bundled with IntelliJ. This child process needs the permissions.

Can:

This is a bit round about.

  1. Use Gradle to build your project, IntelliJ recognizes Gradle projects and interacts nicely with them
  2. Remove all occurrences of IntelliJ and Java from Accessibility permissions in macOS system preferences -> Security and Privacy.
  3. Be sure all Gradle daemons are stopped (or if you haven't run Gradle yet, then be sure the next step is the first time gradle runs since you last rebooted your computer)
  4. Run you application from the command line using Gradle
  5. macOS will prompt to give permissions, open system preferences and give java permission.
  6. Run IntelliJ and run your app as a gradle project through IntelliJ, and voila!

What happens: IntelliJ, in step 6, uses the already running gradle daemon process to execute your application. This process is using java and java has permission to move the mouse cursor in macOS system preferences.

It's not pretty, but it works. If you're like me, you use gradle anyway for java projects in IntelliJ, and all you have to do is remember to run your project from the command line before running it from IntelliJ. This way, the gradle daemon (a java process) will be responsible for running the application and proper permissions will be detected by macOS.

I tested this with the following code (note a few modifications, as the OP code had some "bugs"):

import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;
import java.awt.AWTException;
import java.awt.MouseInfo;
import java.awt.Robot;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

public class RunRobot {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int x = 12,
            y = 300;
        final int[] xAct = new int[1],
                    yAct = new int[1];
        try {
            Robot robot = new Robot();
            robot.mouseMove(x, y);
            robot.waitForIdle();

            SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(()->{
                xAct[0] = (int) MouseInfo.getPointerInfo().getLocation().getX();
                yAct[0] = (int) MouseInfo.getPointerInfo().getLocation().getY();
            });

            String sPred = String.format("Predicted mouse location : %, d, %, d", x, y),
                   sAct  = String.format("Actual    mouse location : %, d, %, d", xAct[0], yAct[0]);

            System.out.println(sPred);
            System.out.println(sAct);
        } catch (InterruptedException | AWTException | InvocationTargetException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

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