93

The issue

In a low level bare-metal embedded context, I would like to create a blank space in the memory, within a C++ structure and without any name, to forbid the user to access such memory location.

Right now, I have achieved it by putting an ugly uint32_t :96; bitfield which will conveniently take the place of three words, but it will raise a warning from GCC (Bitfield too large to fit in uint32_t), which is pretty legitimate.

While it works fine, it is not very clean when you want to distribute a library with several hundreds of those warnings...

How do I do that properly?

Why is there an issue in the first place?

The project I'm working on consists of defining the memory structure of different peripherals of a whole microcontroller line (STMicroelectronics STM32). To do so, the result is a class which contains a union of several structures which define all registers, depending on the targeted microcontroller.

One simple example for a pretty simple peripheral is the following: a General Purpose Input/Output (GPIO)

union
{

    struct
    {
        GPIO_MAP0_MODER;
        GPIO_MAP0_OTYPER;
        GPIO_MAP0_OSPEEDR;
        GPIO_MAP0_PUPDR;
        GPIO_MAP0_IDR;
        GPIO_MAP0_ODR;
        GPIO_MAP0_BSRR;
        GPIO_MAP0_LCKR;
        GPIO_MAP0_AFR;
        GPIO_MAP0_BRR;
        GPIO_MAP0_ASCR;
    };
    struct
    {
        GPIO_MAP1_CRL;
        GPIO_MAP1_CRH;
        GPIO_MAP1_IDR;
        GPIO_MAP1_ODR;
        GPIO_MAP1_BSRR;
        GPIO_MAP1_BRR;
        GPIO_MAP1_LCKR;
        uint32_t :32;
        GPIO_MAP1_AFRL;
        GPIO_MAP1_AFRH;
        uint32_t :64;
    };
    struct
    {
        uint32_t :192;
        GPIO_MAP2_BSRRL;
        GPIO_MAP2_BSRRH;
        uint32_t :160;
    };
};

Where all GPIO_MAPx_YYY is a macro, defined either as uint32_t :32 or the register type (a dedicated structure).

Here you see the uint32_t :192; which works well, but it triggers a warning.

What I've considered so far:

I might have replaced it by several uint32_t :32; (6 here), but I have some extreme cases where I have uint32_t :1344; (42) (among others). So I would rather not add about one hundred lines on top of 8k others, even though the structure generation is scripted.

The exact warning message is something like: width of 'sool::ll::GPIO::<anonymous union>::<anonymous struct>::<anonymous>' exceeds its type (I just love how shady it is).

I would rather not solve this by simply removing the warning, but the use of

#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-WTheRightFlag"
/* My code */
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop

may be a solution... if I find TheRightFlag. However, as pointed out in this thread, gcc/cp/class.c with this sad code part:

warning_at (DECL_SOURCE_LOCATION (field), 0,
        "width of %qD exceeds its type", field);

Which tells us that there is no -Wxxx flag to remove this warning...

  • 26
    have you consided char unused[12]; and so on? – M.M Nov 1 '18 at 21:56
  • 3
    I would just suppress the warning. [class.bit]/1 guarantees the behavior of uint32_t :192;. – NathanOliver Nov 1 '18 at 22:07
  • 3
    @NathanOliver I would gladly too, but it seems that this warning is not suppressible (Using GCC) or I didn't find how to do so. Moreover, it still is not a clean way to do (but it would be pretty satisfying) . I managed to find the correct "-W" flag but didn't manage to apply it only on my own files (I don't want the user to remove this kind of warnings for his work) – J Faucher Nov 1 '18 at 22:13
  • 3
    BTW you can write :42*32 instead of :1344 – M.M Nov 1 '18 at 22:15
  • 1
    Try this to suppress warnings? gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/… – Hitobat Nov 1 '18 at 22:26

10 Answers 10

34

Use multiple adjacent anonymous bitfields. So instead of:

    uint32_t :160;

for example, you'd have:

    uint32_t :32;
    uint32_t :32;
    uint32_t :32;
    uint32_t :32;
    uint32_t :32;

One for each register you want to be anonymous.

If you have large spaces to fill it may be clearer and less error prone to use macros to repeat the single 32 bit space. For example, given:

#define REPEAT_2(a) a a
#define REPEAT_4(a) REPEAT_2(a) REPEAT_2(a)
#define REPEAT_8(a) REPEAT_4(a) REPEAT_4(a)
#define REPEAT_16(a) REPEAT_8(a) REPEAT_8(a)
#define REPEAT_32(a) REPEAT_16(a) REPEAT_16(a)

Then a 1344 (42 * 32 bit) space can be added thus:

struct
{
    ...
    REPEAT_32(uint32_t :32;) 
    REPEAT_8(uint32_t :32;) 
    REPEAT_2(uint32_t :32;)
    ...
};
  • Thanks for the answer. I already considered that, however it would add over 200 lines on some of my files (uint32_t :1344; is in the place) so I would rather not have to go this way... – J Faucher Nov 1 '18 at 23:11
  • 1
    @JFaucher Added a possible solution to your line count requirement. If you have such requirements, you might mention them in the question to avoid getting answers that do not meet them. – Clifford Nov 2 '18 at 12:30
  • Thanks for the edit and sorry for not stating the line count thing. My point is that my code is already painful to dive in since there is a lot of lines and I'd rather avoid adding too much more. Therefore, I was asking if someone knew a "clean" or "official" way to avoid using adjacent anonymous bitfield (even if that work fine). The macro approach seems fine to me though. By the way, in your example, don't you got a 36*32 bits space ? – J Faucher Nov 2 '18 at 13:15
  • @JFaucher - corrected. I/O register mapping files are necessarily large due to the large number of registers - normally you write once, and maintenance is not an issue because the hardware is a constant. Except by "hiding" registers you are making maintenance work for yourself if you later need to access them. You are aware of course that all STM32 devices already have a register map header provided by the vendor? It would be far less error-prone to use that. – Clifford Nov 2 '18 at 14:13
  • 2
    I agree with you and, to be fair, I think that I will go by one of those two method displayed in your answer. I just wanted to be sure that C++ doesn't provide a better solution before doing so. I am well aware that ST provide those header, however those are built upon the massive use of macros and bitwise operations. My project is to build a C++ equivalent to those headers which will be less error prone (using enum classes, bitfields and so on). That's why we use a script to "translate" the CMSIS headers into our C++ structures (and found some errors in ST files btw) – J Faucher Nov 2 '18 at 14:33
44

How about a C++-ish way?

namespace GPIO {

static volatile uint32_t &MAP0_MODER = *reinterpret_cast<uint32_t*>(0x4000);
static volatile uint32_t &MAP0_OTYPER = *reinterpret_cast<uint32_t*>(0x4004);

}

int main() {
    GPIO::MAP0_MODER = 42;
}

You get autocompletion because of the GPIO namespace, and there is no need for dummy padding. Even, it is more clear what's going on, as you can see the address of each register, you don't have to rely on the compiler's padding behavior at all.

  • 1
    This might possible optimize less well than a struct for access to multiple MMIO registers from the same function. With a pointer to the base address in a register, the compiler can use load/store instructions with immediate displacements, like ldr r0, [r4, #16], while compilers are more likely to miss that optimization with each address declared separately. GCC will probably load each GPIO address into a separate register. (From a literal pool, although some of them can be represented as rotated immediates in Thumb encoding.) – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 2:12
  • 4
    Turns out my worries were unfounded; ARM GCC does optimize this way, too. godbolt.org/z/ztB7hi. But note that you want static volatile uint32_t &MAP0_MODER, not inline. An inline variable doesn't compile. (static avoids having any static storage for the pointer, and volatile is exactly what you want for MMIO to avoid dead-store elimination or optimization of write / read-back.) – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 2:59
  • 1
    @PeterCordes: inline variables is a new C++17 feature. But you're right, static does equally well for this case. Thanks for mentioning volatile, I'll add it to my answer (and change inline to static, so it works for pre C++17). – geza Nov 2 '18 at 3:07
  • 2
    This is not strictly well defined behavior see this twitter thread and maybe this one is useful – Shafik Yaghmour Nov 2 '18 at 6:39
  • 1
    @JFaucher: create as many namespaces as structs you have, and use standalone functions in that namespace. So, you'll have GPIOA::togglePin(). – geza Nov 2 '18 at 13:44
20

In the embedded systems arena, you can model hardware either by using a structure or by defining pointers to the register addresses.

Modeling by structure is not recommended because the compiler is allowed to add padding between members for alignment purposes (although many compilers for embedded systems have a pragma for packing the structure).

Example:

uint16_t * const UART1 = (uint16_t *)(0x40000);
const unsigned int UART_STATUS_OFFSET = 1U;
const unsigned int UART_TRANSMIT_REGISTER = 2U;
uint16_t * const UART1_STATUS_REGISTER = (UART1 + UART_STATUS_OFFSET);
uint16_t * const UART1_TRANSMIT_REGISTER = (UART1 + UART_TRANSMIT_REGISTER);

You could also use the array notation:

uint16_t status = UART1[UART_STATUS_OFFSET];  

If you must use the structure, IMHO, the best method to skip addresses would be to define a member and not access it:

struct UART1
{
  uint16_t status;
  uint16_t reserved1; // Transmit register
  uint16_t receive_register;
};

In one of our projects we have both constants and structs from different vendors (vendor 1 uses constants while vendor 2 uses structures).

  • Thanks for your answer. However, I choose to use a structure approach to ease the work of the user when he got an auto-complete feature (You only will have the right attributes displayed) and I don't want to "show" the user the reserved slots as pointed out in a comment of my first post. – J Faucher Nov 1 '18 at 23:01
  • You can still have that by making the above address static members of a structure assuming that autocomplete is able to show static members. If not, it can be inline member functions too. – Phil1970 Nov 2 '18 at 1:09
  • @JFaucher I'm not an embedded systems person and haven't tested this, but wouldn't the autocomplete issue be resolved by declaring the reserved member private? (You can declare private members in a struct, and you can use public: and private: as many times as you want, to get the correct ordering of the fields.) – Nathaniel Nov 2 '18 at 6:13
  • 1
    @Nathaniel: Not so; if a class has both public and private non-static data members, then it's not a standard layout type, so it doesn't provide the ordering guarantees you're thinking of. (And I'm pretty sure the OP's use-case does require a standard layout type.) – ruakh Nov 2 '18 at 6:42
  • 1
    Don't forget volatile on those declarations, BTW, for memory-mapped I/O registers. – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 9:11
12

geza's right that you really don't want to be using classes for this.

But, if you were to insist, the best way to add an unused member of n bytes' width, is simply to do so:

char unused[n];

If you add an implementation-specific pragma to prevent the addition of arbitrary padding to the class's members, this can work.


For GNU C/C++ (gcc, clang, and others that support the same extensions), one of the valid places to put the attribute is:

#include <stddef.h>
#include <stdint.h>
#include <assert.h>  // for C11 static_assert, so this is valid C as well as C++

struct __attribute__((packed)) GPIO {
    volatile uint32_t a;
    char unused[3];
    volatile uint32_t b;
};

static_assert(offsetof(struct GPIO, b) == 7, "wrong GPIO struct layout");

(example on the Godbolt compiler explorer showing offsetof(GPIO, b) = 7 bytes.)

9

To expand on @Clifford's and @Adam Kotwasinski's answers:

#define REP10(a)        a a a a a a a a a a
#define REP1034(a)      REP10(REP10(REP10(a))) REP10(a a a) a a a a

struct foo {
        int before;
        REP1034(unsigned int :32;)
        int after;
};
int main(void){
        struct foo bar;
        return 0;
}
  • I have incorporated a variant of your suggestion in my answer following further requirements in a comment. Credit where credit is due. – Clifford Nov 2 '18 at 12:34
7

To expand on Clifford's answer, you can always macro out the anonymous bitfields.

So instead of

uint32_t :160;

use

#define EMPTY_32_1 \
 uint32_t :32
#define EMPTY_32_2 \
 uint32_t :32;     \ // I guess this also can be replaced with uint64_t :64
 uint32_t :32
#define EMPTY_32_3 \
 uint32_t :32;     \
 uint32_t :32;     \
 uint32_t :32
#define EMPTY_UINT32(N) EMPTY_32_ ## N

And then use it like

struct A {
  EMPTY_UINT32(3);
  /* which resolves to EMPTY_32_3, which then resolves to real declarations */
}

Unfortunately, you'll need as many EMPTY_32_X variants as many bytes you have :( Still, it allows you to have single declarations in your struct.

  • 5
    Using Boost CPP macros, I think you can use recursion to avoid having to hand-create all the necessary macros. – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 2:15
  • 3
    You can cascade them (up to preprocessor recursion limit, but that's usually ample). So #define EMPTY_32_2 EMPTY_32_1; EMPTY_32_1 and #define EMPTY_32_3 EMPTY_32_2; EMPTY_32_1 etc. – Miral Nov 2 '18 at 3:51
  • @PeterCordes perhaps, but the tags indicate that perhaps booth C and C++ compatibility are required. – Clifford Nov 2 '18 at 12:27
  • 2
    C and C++ use the same C preprocessor; I don't see an issue other than maybe making the necessary boost header available for C. They do put the CPP-macro stuff in a separate header. – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 12:30
1

To define a large spacer as groups of 32 bits.

#define M_32(x)   M_2(M_16(x))
#define M_16(x)   M_2(M_8(x))
#define M_8(x)    M_2(M_4(x))
#define M_4(x)    M_2(M_2(x))
#define M_2(x)    x x

#define SPACER int : 32;

struct {
    M_32(SPACER) M_8(SPACER) M_4(SPACER)
};
1

I think it would be beneficial to introduce some more structure; which may, in turn, solve the issue of spacers.

Name the variants

While flat namespaces are nice, the issue is that you end up with a motley collection of fields and no simple way of passing all related fields together. Furthermore, by using anonymous structs in an anonymous union you cannot pass references to the structs themselves, or use them as template parameters.

As a first step, I would, therefore, consider breaking out the struct:

// GpioMap0.h
#pragma once

// #includes

namespace Gpio {
struct Map0 {
    GPIO_MAP0_MODER;
    GPIO_MAP0_OTYPER;
    GPIO_MAP0_OSPEEDR;
    GPIO_MAP0_PUPDR;
    GPIO_MAP0_IDR;
    GPIO_MAP0_ODR;
    GPIO_MAP0_BSRR;
    GPIO_MAP0_LCKR;
    GPIO_MAP0_AFR;
    GPIO_MAP0_BRR;
    GPIO_MAP0_ASCR;
};
} // namespace Gpio

// GpioMap1.h
#pragma once

// #includes

namespace Gpio {
struct Map1 {
    // fields
};
} // namespace Gpio

// ... others headers ...

And finally, the global header:

// Gpio.h
#pragma once

#include "GpioMap0.h"
#include "GpioMap1.h"
// ... other headers ...

namespace Gpio {
union Gpio {
    Map0 map0;
    Map1 map1;
    // ... others ...
};
} // namespace Gpio

Now, I can write a void special_map0(Gpio:: Map0 volatile& map);, as well as get a quick overview of all available architectures at a glance.

Simple Spacers

With the definition split in multiple headers, the headers are individually much more manageable.

Therefore, my initial approach to exactly meet your requirements would be to stick with repeated std::uint32_t:32;. Yes, it adds a few 100s lines to the existing 8k lines, but since each header is individually smaller, it may not be as bad.

If you are willing to consider more exotic solutions, though...

Introducing $.

It is a little-known fact that $ is a viable character for C++ identifiers; it's even a viable starting character (unlike digits).

A $ appearing in the source code would likely raise eyebrows, and $$$$ is definitely going to attract attention during code reviews. This is something that you can easily take advantage of:

#define GPIO_RESERVED(Index_, N_) std::uint32_t $$$$##Index_[N_];

struct Map3 {
    GPIO_RESERVED(0, 6);
    GPIO_MAP2_BSRRL;
    GPIO_MAP2_BSRRH;
    GPIO_RESERVED(1, 5);
};

You can even put together a simple "lint" as a pre-commit hook or in your CI which looks for $$$$ in the committed C++ code and reject such commits.

  • 1
    Remember that the OP's specific use-case is for describing memory-mapped I/O registers to the compiler. It never makes sense to copy the whole struct by value. (And each member like GPIO_MAP0_MODER is presumably volatile.) Possibly reference or template-parameter usage of the previously-anonymous members could be useful, though. And for the general case of padding structs, sure. But the use-case explains why the OP left them anonymous. – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 21:21
  • You might use $$$padding##Index_[N_]; to make the field name more self-explanatory in case it ever came up in autocomplete or when debugging. (Or zz$$$padding to make it sort after GPIO... names, because the whole point of this exercise according to the OP is nicer autocomplete for memory-mapped I/O location names.) – Peter Cordes Nov 2 '18 at 21:24
  • @PeterCordes: I scanned the answer again to check, and never saw any mention of copying. I did forgot the volatile qualifier on the reference, though, which has been corrected. As for naming; I'll let it up to the OP. There are many variations (padding, reserved, ...), and even the "best" prefix for auto-completion may depend on the IDE at hand, though I do appreciate the idea of tweaking the sorting. – Matthieu M. Nov 3 '18 at 11:39
  • I was referring to "and no simple way of passing all related fields together", which sounds like struct assignment, and the rest of the sentence about naming the struct members of the union. – Peter Cordes Nov 3 '18 at 11:51
  • 1
    @PeterCordes: I was thinking of passing by reference, as illustrated later down. I find it awkward that the OP's structure prevent them from creating "modules" that can be statically proven to only access a specific architecture (by taking a reference to the specific struct) and that the union ends up being propagated everywhere even in architecture-specific bits which could care less about the others. – Matthieu M. Nov 3 '18 at 13:21
0

Although I agree structs should not be used for MCU I/O port access, original question can be answered this way:

struct __attribute__((packed)) test {
       char member1;
       char member2;
       volatile struct __attribute__((packed))
       {
       private:
              volatile char spacer_bytes[7];
       }  spacer;
       char member3;
       char member4;
};

You may need to replace __attribute__((packed)) with #pragma pack or similar depending on your compiler syntax.

Mixing private and public members in a struct normally results in that memory layout is no longer guaranteed by C++ standard. However if all non-static members of a struct are private, it is still considered POD / standard layout, and so are structs that embed them.

For some reason gcc produces a warning if a member of an anonymous struct is private so I had to give it a name. Alternatively, wrapping it into yet another anonymous struct also gets rid of the warning (this may be a bug).

Note that spacer member is not itself private, so data can still be accessed this way:

(char*)(void*)&testobj.spacer;

However such an expression looks like an obvious hack, and hopefully would not be used without a really good reason, let alone as a mistake.

  • 1
    Users cannot declare identifiers in any namespace containing double underscores anywhere in the name (in C++, or only at the beginning in C); doing so makes the code ill-formed. These names are reserved to the implementation and therefore can in theory conflict with yours in horribly subtle and capricious ways. Anyway, the compiler has no obligation to retain your code if it contains them. Such names aren't a quick way to get 'internal' names for your own use. – underscore_d Nov 4 '18 at 19:21
  • Thanks, fixed it. – Jack White Nov 5 '18 at 12:25
-1

Anti-solution.

DO NOT DO THIS: Mix private and public fields.

Maybe a macro with a counter to generate uniqie variable names will be useful?

#define CONCAT_IMPL( x, y ) x##y
#define MACRO_CONCAT( x, y ) CONCAT_IMPL( x, y )
#define RESERVED MACRO_CONCAT(Reserved_var, __COUNTER__) 


struct {
    GPIO_MAP1_CRL;
    GPIO_MAP1_CRH;
    GPIO_MAP1_IDR;
    GPIO_MAP1_ODR;
    GPIO_MAP1_BSRR;
    GPIO_MAP1_BRR;
    GPIO_MAP1_LCKR;
private:
    char RESERVED[4];
public:
    GPIO_MAP1_AFRL;
    GPIO_MAP1_AFRH;
private:
    char RESERVED[8];
};
  • 4
  • 3
    Ok. If Nobody minds I'll leave the answer as what not to do. – Robert Andrzejuk Nov 2 '18 at 11:11
  • 4
    @NicHartley Considering the number of answer, we are close to a "research" question. In research, knowledge of impasses is still knowledge, it avoids others to take the wrong way. +1 for the bravery. – Oliv Nov 2 '18 at 18:27
  • 1
    @Oliv And I -1'd because the OP required something, this answer violated the requirement, and therefore it's a bad answer. I explicitly did not make any value judgement, positive or negative, on the person, in either comment -- just on the answer. I think we can both agree it's bad. What that says about the person is off-topic for this site. (Though IMO anyone willing to take some time to contribute an idea is doing something right, even if the idea doesn't pan out) – Nic Hartley Nov 2 '18 at 18:29
  • 2
    Yes it is the wrong answer. But I fear some people may come to the same idea. Because of the comment and link I just learnt something, that's not negative points for me. – Robert Andrzejuk Nov 2 '18 at 19:19

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