6

I was wondering if the complexity of a empty for loop like below is still O(n^2)

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
    }
}

update : changed height and width variable to n

5
  • 5
    The loop is not empty. Counters are being incremented. Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:38
  • 3
    Well, complexity is a rather theoretical concept, and this is a rather perverse code. Best not to worry too much about it. Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:40
  • 2
    That code is not O(n^2). The complexity is O(height * width). Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:43
  • 1
    Silently modifying the question is not the best idea. It makes the existing answers weird.
    – user1196549
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:54
  • 1
    @YvesDaoust noted
    – mzz
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:57

7 Answers 7

7

If it won't get optimized out by the compiler, the complexity will still be O(n^2) (or actually O(N*M)) - even though the loops bodies are empty, the condition checks and incrementation of both counters are still valid operations which have to be performed.

5
  • But a smart compiler could set i=height-1;j=width-1 and be done with it. No O(n^2) there. Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:41
  • 1
    @HighPerformanceMark Wouldn't a smart compiler just output nothing? Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:44
  • 1
    @HighPerformanceMark: or simply skip, as the variables do not survive the scope of the loops.
    – user1196549
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:44
  • Yes, to the commenters on my comment. And still this answer has 3 upvotes. Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 17:09
  • 1
    @HighPerformanceMark they says " If it won't get optimized out by the compiler" so its correct
    – mzz
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 17:18
3

The complexity of any for loop that runs from 1 .. n is O(n), even if it does not do anything inside it. So in your case it is always going to be O(n^2) irrespective of what you are doing inside the loops.

Here in your example i and j are running till n and hence individually depends on the value of n making the the nested for loops having a complexity of O(n^2)

0

Pay attention, you can do something else than i++, e.g. fun(i).

2
  • Yep, this is more fun. :-)
    – user1196549
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:44
  • Good one... haha
    – mzz
    Commented Nov 2, 2018 at 16:46
0

Based off of my understanding of time-complexity of an algorithm, we assume that there are one or more fundamental operations. Re-writing the code using a while loop and expanding for logic :

int i = 0, j = 0;

while(i < n)
{
    while(j < n)
    {
        ; //nop or no-operation
        j = j + 1; // let jInc be alias for j + 1  
    }
    i = i + 1;  // let iInc be alias for i + 1
}

Now if your objective is to perform a 'nop' n^2 times, then the time complexity is O(0) where 'nop' is the fundamental operation. However, if the objective is to iterate 2 counters ('i' and 'j') from 0 to n -1 or count n^2 times then the fundamental operations can be addition (j + 1 and i + 1), comparison (i < n and j < n) or assignment (i = iInc and j = jInc) i.e. O(n^2).

0

Big O is just an approximation for evaluating count of steps in algorithm. We could have formulas for exact count of steps in algorithm, but they are complex and difficult to realise the actual complexity.

1) O(0.000 000 001*n^2 - 1 000 000 000) = n^2

2) O(1 000 000 000*n ) = n

Despite of Big O first case is less e.g. for N = 0..1 000 000

More than, it doesn't take into account how fast particular step.

So, your loop is a case when O(n^2) could be less than O(1)

0

The nested loop performs constant work O(1) n times, so nO(1)=O(n)O(1)=O(n).

The external loop performs the above mentioned O(n) work n times so nO(n)=O(n)O(n) =O(n^2).

In general:``

  • f(n) ∈ O(f(n))
  • cf(n) ∈ O(f(n)) if c is constant
  • f(n)g(n) ∈ O(f(n)g(n))
0

It depends on the compiler. Theoretically, it's O(n), where n is the number of loops, even if there's no task inside the loop.

But, in case of some compiler, the compiler optimizes the loop and doesn't iterates n times. In this situation, the complexity is O(1).

For the loop mentioned above, it's both O(n) and O(n^2). But, it's good practice to write O(n^2) as Big O covers upper bound.

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