9

With Spring Boot 2.1 bean overriding is disabled by default, which is a good thing.

However I do have some tests where I replace beans with mocked instances using Mockito. With the default setting Tests with such a configuration will fail due to bean overriding.

The only way I found worked, was to enable bean overriding through application properties:

spring.main.allow-bean-definition-overriding=true

However I would really like to ensure minimal bean definition setup for my test configuration, which would be pointed out by spring with the overriding disabled.

The beans that I am overriding are either

  • Defined in another configuration that imported into my test configuration
  • Auto-discovered bean by annotation scanning

What I was thinking should work in the test configuration overriding the bean and slap a @Primary on it, as we are used to for data source configurations. This however has no effect and got me wondering: Is the @Primary and the disabled bean overriding contradictory?

Some example:

package com.stackoverflow.foo;
@Service
public class AService {
}

package com.stackoverflow.foo;
public class BService {
}

package com.stackoverflow.foo;
@Configuration
public BaseConfiguration {
    @Bean
    @Lazy
    public BService bService() {
        return new BService();
    }
}

package com.stackoverflow.bar;
@Configuration
@Import({BaseConfiguration.class})
public class TestConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public BService bService() {
        return Mockito.mock(BService.class);
    }
}
  • 1
    Instead of providing your own configuration with a mock, why not use @MockBean and let Spring Boot do the replacement. So instead of @Autowired BService bService do @MockBean BService bService in your code. Saves you maintaining a configuration just for testing. – M. Deinum Nov 5 '18 at 7:47
  • Comment from M. Deinum above does solve the case indeed, but only when you actually use mocks. When you need to override a bean in tests — it doesn't help. – Innokenty Dec 4 '18 at 10:47
2

Overriding beans means that there may be only one bean with a unique name or id in the context. So you can provide two beans in the following way:

package com.stackoverflow.foo;
@Configuration
public class BaseConfiguration {
   @Bean
   @Lazy
   public BService bService1() {
       return new BService();
   }
}

package com.stackoverflow.bar;
@Configuration
@Import({BaseConfiguration.class})
public class TestConfiguration {
    @Bean
    public BService bService2() {
        return Mockito.mock(BService.class);
    }
}

If you add @Primary then primary bean will be injected by default in:

@Autowired
BService bService;
  • Did that work for anyone? Doesn't work for me. – Innokenty Dec 4 '18 at 10:46
2

It is allowed to override @Component with @Bean by default. In your case

@Service
public class AService {
}

@Component
public class BService {
    @Autowired
    public BService() { ... }
}

@Configuration
@ComponentScan
public BaseConfiguration {
}

@Configuration
// WARNING! Doesn't work with @SpringBootTest annotation
@Import({BaseConfiguration.class})
public class TestConfiguration {
    @Bean // you allowed to override @Component with @Bean.
    public BService bService() {
        return Mockito.mock(BService.class);
    }
}
  • I still need to apply this property: spring.main.allow-bean-definition-overriding=true as well as @SpringBootTest(classes = {Application.class, TestConfiguration.class}) to make it work. – Duc Tran Jan 25 at 8:12

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