what I'm after is something I can feed a number into and it will return the highest order bit. I'm sure there's a simple way. Below is an example output (left is the input)

1 -> 1
2 -> 2
3 -> 2
4 -> 4
5 -> 4
6 -> 4
7 -> 4
8 -> 8
9 -> 8
...
63 -> 32

13 Answers 13

up vote 28 down vote accepted

This should do the trick.

int hob (int num)
{
    if (!num)
        return 0;

    int ret = 1;

    while (num >>= 1)
        ret <<= 1;

    return ret;
}

hob(1234) returns 1024
hob(1024) returns 1024
hob(1023) returns 512

  • 1
    To make it work with zeros just add: while (num >>= 1 && num) – Paul Hargreaves Sep 10 '08 at 6:21
  • Actually you need an if to check for zero. Since ret starts at 1 and grows, this algorithm won't make it hit 0, the answer for the input of 0. – Kyle Cronin Sep 10 '08 at 14:39
  • 3
    My answer is better. No loops! – erickson Sep 20 '08 at 0:01
  • a good compiler will unroll loops for performance. If it actually does perform faster w/o the loop. – davenpcj Feb 21 '12 at 17:09
  • 3
    For GCC, the better function is __builtin_clz(v) -- it returns the number of leading (binary) zeros, and hence you can get the most significant bit position by 32-clz(num) (or 64-clzll(num) for 64 bit) – Soren Oct 17 '13 at 16:56

From Hacker's Delight:

int hibit(unsigned int n) {
    n |= (n >>  1);
    n |= (n >>  2);
    n |= (n >>  4);
    n |= (n >>  8);
    n |= (n >> 16);
    return n - (n >> 1);
}

This version is for 32-bit ints, but the logic can be extended for 64-bits or higher.

  • isn't it supposed to be a bit more efficient to use XOR in the last line? n ^ (n >> 1) – alveko May 28 '13 at 15:48
  • 2
    @alveko while XOR can be implemented faster than subtraction at the transistor/gate level, they will take the same number of clock cycles on most modern CPUs – Drew McGowen Jan 8 '15 at 23:49
  • 1
    less transistors, more efficiency, less heat, more cycles :) – Steazy Feb 16 '16 at 8:42
  • 1
    For intuition, this "spreads" the MSB to the right, so that 0b100010 becomes 0b111111, then shifts right for 0b011111 and subtracts that, yielding 0b100000. – Warty Jun 16 at 10:04

fls bottoms out to a hardware instruction on many architectures. I suspect this is probably the simplest, fastest way of doing it.

1<<(fls(input)-1)
  • 1
    Clearly the best answer. I wonder why all those websites like bit twiddling hacks, who focus so much on reducing the number of operations for this kind of problems, don't even mention this. – Cimbali Mar 4 '14 at 19:07
  • 1
    What happens if a bit is not set? How does one shift left by a negative count? I believe that's undefined behavior. – jww Sep 21 '14 at 0:50
  • 1
    @jww That is correct. fls(0) -> 0, leaving the rhs of << negative, which is undefined. In my defense, this was not stated in the problem space ;-) – Fabian Sep 23 '14 at 0:51
  • @Fabian - OK, plus one. – jww Sep 23 '14 at 0:52
  • 1
    @krs013 - I don't know. It isn't available outside of POSIX if not mistaken. – wolfdawn Sep 29 '15 at 15:54

like obfuscated code? Try this:

1 << ( int) log2( x)

  • 1
    I love this solution, but it's just a little too obfuscated. Still gets a vote as the most compact solution. – Harley Holcombe Sep 11 '08 at 0:09
  • 9
    If you want to pawn the job off on the FPU, sure. :) – Jeffrey Hantin Jan 23 '09 at 3:52
  • 6
    Mathematically correct, but this could be much slower than bitwise operations. – mateusza Feb 2 '11 at 12:36
  • 1
    It is possible to find log2 using bitwise, see my answer – bobobobo Sep 11 '12 at 19:10
  • 2
    If you cast it to double first, the exponent part of the number readily tells you the order. – Calmarius Sep 20 '13 at 13:35

This can easily be solved with existing library calls.

int highestBit(int v){
  return fls(v) << 1;
}

The Linux man page gives more details on this function and its counterparts for other input types.

  • 4
    Actually, ffs returns the lowest order bit. – Joel Rein Mar 19 '12 at 1:56
  • 1
    Use (64-__builtin_clzll(v)) instead.... – Soren Oct 17 '13 at 16:53
  • 1
    @Soren even better, use (8*sizeof(long long) - __builtin_clzll(v)) – Ragnar Sep 17 '15 at 20:11
  • 1
    @Ragnar, if you going that way use (CHAR_BIT*sizeof(long long) - __builtin_clzll(v) but I don't this this formulation is sufficiently portable to need that. <limits.h> – Jasen Dec 7 '17 at 22:54

Continually remove the low order bit comes to mind...

int highest_order_bit( int x )
{
    int y = x;
    do { 
        x = y;
        y = x & (x-1); //remove low order bit
    }
    while( y != 0 );
    return x;
}

A fast way to do this is via a look-up table. For a 32-bit input, and an 8-bit look-up table, in only requires 4 iterations:

int highest_order_bit(int x)
{
    static const int msb_lut[256] =
        {
            0, 0, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, // 0000_0000 - 0000_0111
            3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, // 0000_1000 - 0000_1111
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, // 0001_0000 - 0001_0111
            4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, // 0001_1000 - 0001_1111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0010_0000 - 0010_0111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0010_1000 - 0010_1111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0011_0000 - 0011_0111
            5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5, // 0011_1000 - 0011_1111

            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0100_0000 - 0100_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0100_1000 - 0100_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0101_0000 - 0101_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0101_1000 - 0101_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0110_0000 - 0110_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0110_1000 - 0110_1111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0111_0000 - 0111_0111
            6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, // 0111_1000 - 0111_1111

            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1000_0000 - 1000_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1000_1000 - 1000_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1001_0000 - 1001_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1001_1000 - 1001_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1010_0000 - 1010_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1010_1000 - 1010_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1011_0000 - 1011_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1011_1000 - 1011_1111

            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1100_0000 - 1100_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1100_1000 - 1100_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1101_0000 - 1101_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1101_1000 - 1101_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1110_0000 - 1110_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1110_1000 - 1110_1111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1111_0000 - 1111_0111
            7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, // 1111_1000 - 1111_1111
        };

    int byte;
    int byte_cnt;

    for (byte_cnt = 3; byte_cnt >= 0; byte_cnt--)
    {
        byte = (x >> (byte_cnt * 8)) & 0xff;
        if (byte != 0)
        {
            return msb_lut[byte] + (byte_cnt * 8);
        }
    }

    return -1;
}
  • 5
    fastest to execute, but not to type ;) – kenny Sep 21 '09 at 15:12
  • 2
    erickson's answer is faster... It uses less memory, so it's more cache efficient. – Calmarius Sep 20 '13 at 13:39

The linux kernel has a number of handy bitops like this, coded in the most efficient way for a number of architectures. You can find generic versions in include/asm-generic/bitops/fls.h (and friends), but see also include/asm-x86/bitops.h for a definition using inline assembly if speed is of the essence, and portability is not.

  • The Linux kernel is full of undefined behavior in bitops. I don't recommend anyone use it (or copy/paste the routines) unless they know what they are doing or have a complete set of self tests for the functionality. – jww Sep 21 '14 at 0:46
// Note doesn't cover the case of 0 (0 returns 1)
inline unsigned int hibit( unsigned int x )
{
  unsigned int log2Val = 0 ;
  while( x>>=1 ) log2Val++;  // eg x=63 (111111), log2Val=5
  return 1 << log2Val ; // finds 2^5=32
}

If you do not need a portable solution and your code is executing on an x86 compatible CPU you can use _BitScanReverse() intrinsic function provided by Microsoft Visual C/C++ compiler. It maps to BSR CPU instruction which returns the highest bit set.

Little bit late to this party but the simplest solution I found, given a modern GCC as a compiler is simply:

static inline int_t get_msb32 (register unsigned int val)
{
  return 32 - __builtin_clz(val);
}

static inline int get_msb64 (register unsigned long long val)
{
  return 64 - __builtin_clzll(val);
}

It's even relatively portable (at the very least it will work on any GCC platform).

A nifty solution I came up with is to binary search the bits.

uint64_t highestBit(uint64_t a, uint64_t bit_min, uint64_t bit_max, uint16_t bit_shift){
    if(a == 0) return 0;
    if(bit_min >= bit_max){
        if((a & bit_min) != 0)
            return bit_min;
        return 0;
    }
    uint64_t bit_mid = bit_max >> bit_shift;
    bit_shift >>= 1;
    if((a >= bit_mid) && (a < (bit_mid << 1)))
        return bit_mid;
    else if(a > bit_mid)
        return highestBit(a, bit_mid, bit_max, bit_shift);
    else
        return highestBit(a, bit_min, bit_mid, bit_shift);

}

Bit max is the highest power of 2, so for a 64 bit number it would be 2^63. Bit shift should be initialized to half the number of bits, so for 64 bits, it would be 32.

Why not simply do this:

int HiBit(int num){ return (num & 0x80000000) >> 31; }
  • 4
    This does not work, it does get any of the OP-provided examples correct. – Pascal Cuoq Jul 23 '12 at 19:44
  • That tests if the highest bit in a 32 bit integer is set, not what was required. – Anthony Wieser Apr 30 '14 at 9:29
  • 1
    This answer is wrong and should be deleted. – Igor Levicki Jun 3 '15 at 11:58

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.