10

I am currently learning hooks concept in React and trying to understand below example.

    import { useState } from 'react';

    function Example() {
        // Declare a new state variable, which we'll call "count"
        const [count, setCount] = useState(0);

      return (
         <div>
            <p>You clicked {count} times</p>
           <button onClick={() => setCount(count + 1)}>
               Click me
           </button>
        </div>
     );
 }

The above example increments the counter on the handler function parameter itself. What if I want to modify count value inside event handler function

Consider below example

    setCount = () => {
        //how can I modify count value here. Not sure if I can use setState to modify its value
        //also I want to modify other state values as well here. How can I do that
    }

    <button onClick={() => setCount()}>
               Click me
     </button>
10

React hooks are a new way (still being developed) to access the core features of react such as state without having to use classes, in your example if you want to increment a counter directly in the handler function without specifying it directly in the onClick prop, you could do something like:

...
const [count, setCounter] = useState(0);
const [moreStuff, setMoreStuff] = useState(...);
...

const setCount = () => {
    setCounter(count + 1);
    setMoreStuff(...);
    ...
};

and onClick:

<button onClick={setCount}>
    Click me
</button>

I wrote a complete article about hooks with multiple examples (including counters) such as this codepen, I made use of useState, useEffect, useContext, and custom hooks. Also the documentation explains very well how the state hook and other hooks work, hope it helps.

update: Hooks are not longer a proposal, since version 16.8 they're now available to be used, there is a section in React's site that answers some of the FAQ.

5

useState is one of build-in react hooks available in 0.16.7 version.

useState should be used only inside functional components. useState is the way if we need an internal state and don't need to implement more complex logic such as lifecycle methods.

const [state, setState] = useState(initialState);

Returns a stateful value, and a function to update it.

During the initial render, the returned state (state) is the same as the value passed as the first argument (initialState).

The setState function is used to update the state. It accepts a new state value and enqueues a re-render of the component.

Please note that useState hook callback for updating the state behaves differently than components this.setState. To show you the difference I prepared two examples.

class UserInfoClass extends React.Component {
  state = { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe' };
  
  render() {
    return <div>
      <p>userInfo: {JSON.stringify(this.state)}</p>
      <button onClick={() => this.setState({ 
        firstName: 'Jason'
      })}>Update name to Jason</button>
    </div>;
  }
}

// Please note that new object is created when setUserInfo callback is used
function UserInfoFunction() {
  const [userInfo, setUserInfo] = React.useState({ 
    firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe',
  });

  return (
    <div>
      <p>userInfo: {JSON.stringify(userInfo)}</p>
      <button onClick={() => setUserInfo({ firstName: 'Jason' })}>Update name to Jason</button>
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(
  <div>
    <UserInfoClass />
    <UserInfoFunction />
  </div>
, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

New object is created when setUserInfo callback is used. Notice we lost lastName key value. To fixed that we could pass function inside useState.

setUserInfo(prevState => ({ ...prevState, firstName: 'Jason' })

See example:

// Please note that new object is created when setUserInfo callback is used
function UserInfoFunction() {
  const [userInfo, setUserInfo] = React.useState({ 
    firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Doe',
  });

  return (
    <div>
      <p>userInfo: {JSON.stringify(userInfo)}</p>
      <button onClick={() => setUserInfo(prevState => ({
        ...prevState, firstName: 'Jason' }))}>
        Update name to Jason
      </button>
    </div>
  );
}

ReactDOM.render(
    <UserInfoFunction />
, document.querySelector('#app'));
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react.development.js"></script>
<script src="https://unpkg.com/react-dom@16.7.0-alpha.0/umd/react-dom.development.js"></script>

<div id="app"></div>

Unlike the setState method found in class components, useState does not automatically merge update objects. You can replicate this behavior by combining the function updater form with object spread syntax:

setState(prevState => {
  // Object.assign would also work
  return {...prevState, ...updatedValues};
});

For more about useState see official documentation.

2

useState is one of the hooks available in React v16.7.0-alpha. It basically lets you turn your otherwise non-stateful/functional components to one that can have its on state.

At the very basic level, it's used this way:

const [isLoading, setLoading] = useState(true);

This then lets you call setLoading passing a boolean value. It's a cool way of having "stateful" functional component.

NOTE: Hooks are not production ready as it's still in its early stages and therefore not advisable to start using them in production code as the API might change in the future.

1

Hooks are a new feature in React v16.7.0-alpha useState is the “Hook”. useState() set the default value of the any variable and manage in function component(PureComponent functions). ex : const [count, setCount] = useState(0); set the default value of count 0. and u can use setCount to incriment or decriment the value. onClick={() => setCount(count + 1)} incriment the count value.DOC

1

The syntax of useState hook is straightforward.

const [value, setValue] = useState(defaultValue)

if you are not familiar with this syntax, go here.

I would recommend you reading the documentation.There are exelent explenation with decent amount of examples.

import { useState } from 'react';

function Example() {
    // Declare a new state variable, which we'll call "count"
    const [count, setCount] = useState(0);
  
  // its up to you how you do it
  const buttonClickHandler = e => {
   // increment
   // setCount(count + 1)
   
   // decrement
   // setCount(count -1)
   
   // anything
   // setCount(0)
  }
  

  return (
       <div>
          <p>You clicked {count} times</p>
         <button onClick={buttonClickHandler}>
             Click me
         </button>
      </div>
   );
 }

1

useState() is an example built-in React hook that lets you use states in your functional components. This was not possible before React 16.7.

The useState function is a built in hook that can be imported from the react package. It allows you to add state to your functional components. Using the useState hook inside a function component, you can create a piece of state without switching to class components.

NOTE: Please note that Hooks are currently in alpha version so they are not yet ready for production. This also means the API may change.

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