2
const map = {}

for (let i=0;i<10**5;i++) {
    map[i] = true
}


let ans = 0

for (let i in map) {
    for (let j in map) {
        ans += i+j
    }
}


console.log(ans)

The above code when run using node returns the following error -

FATAL ERROR: Ineffective mark-compacts near heap limit Allocation failed - JavaScript heap out of memory 1: 0x100037ddb node::Abort() [/usr/local/bin/node]

Can someone explain the reason why? The map gets instantiated just fine. Only when I loop over the map keys and add them to my ans variable I get this issue?

However the following similar code works fine and prints ans -

let ans = 0

for (let i=0;i<10**5;i++) {
    for (let j=0;j<10**5;j++) {
        ans += i+j
    }
}

console.log(ans)

What is the logic behind this. Why is looping over keys in map so bad?

Node version v10.7.0

6

The problem is your keys are strings, not numbers. You need to call parseInt() or Number() to convert them before adding:

for (let i in map) {
    for (let j in map) {
        ans += Number(i) + Number(j)
    }
}

The loop will still take a long time (you are iterating 10**10 times), but you won't accumulated a huge string that blows up memory usage.

UPDATE: succumbed to the primacy of using Number() instead of parseInt().

  • So you are saying the error is due to OP creating a string that is "too large"? FWIW, no need for praseInt. Use Number(i) or +i. – Felix Kling Nov 6 '18 at 19:15
  • 1
    Yep. The string was getting to be huge. And yes, there are other ways to convert a string to a Number. I didn't think that particular optimization was the point of the question. – Jim B. Nov 6 '18 at 19:16
  • "I didn't think that particular optimization was the point of the question." Sure. I would just use the simplest solution possible. parseInt is just unnecessary. The real optimization would be to move i = parseInt or whatever in the outer loop. – Felix Kling Nov 6 '18 at 19:19
  • 1
    and if you use parseInt, use it with a radix parseInt(string, 10) :) – japrescott Nov 6 '18 at 19:20
  • 1
    I'll add the option to the answer, but not sure why parseInt is meaningfully any better or worse than Number(). Maybe a topic for another question. :-) – Jim B. Nov 6 '18 at 19:20
0

when using for..in, you are iterating over all enumerable properties, including the inherited ones on the prototype chain (so for a Object, there are quite a few)

you need to shield your loop from inherited props with hasOwnProperty as it is outlined in the example on MDN

  • 1
    While that is true, Object.prototype has like 20 properties or so. That's insignificant compared to the number of properties the OP creates. Plus all of these are non-enumerable, so not an issue. – Felix Kling Nov 6 '18 at 19:13
  • the problem is that those props are functions that become strings with the inferred toString() and add up to a concatenation which causes the memory leak – japrescott Nov 6 '18 at 19:21
  • No, that's not the problem. String concatenation is the problem, yes, but again, none of the properties in Object.prototype is included. Plus, property names are never functions. Proof: var ans = 0; for (var i in {1: true, 2: true}) ans += i; console.log(ans); – Felix Kling Nov 6 '18 at 19:25
0

The reason as mentioned in accepted answer was that I was adding strings. But also converting from string to int is a costly operation specially when looping over such large amount of numbers, it will take forever.

So for someone else who is reading this question and has to use map can use Javascript Map instead of Object as used in my example above because Map can support any type of key (not just strings). So the code for that will be -

const map = new Map()

for (let i=0;i<10**5;i++) {
    map.set(i, true)
}

let ans = 0

for (const i of map.keys()) {
    for (const j of map.keys()) {
        ans += i + j
    }
}


console.log(ans)
  • 1
    Why not simply use an array in that case? – Felix Kling Nov 7 '18 at 0:09

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