218

With React's new Effect Hooks, I can tell React to skip applying an effect if certain values haven't changed between re-renders - Example from React's docs:

useEffect(() => {
  document.title = `You clicked ${count} times`;
}, [count]); // Only re-run the effect if count changes

But the example above applies the effect upon initial render, and upon subsequent re-renders where count has changed. How can I tell React to skip the effect on the initial render?

1
  • 2
    Have you looked into React.useMemo? Jul 8, 2020 at 23:01

11 Answers 11

231

As the guide states,

The Effect Hook, useEffect, adds the ability to perform side effects from a function component. It serves the same purpose as componentDidMount, componentDidUpdate, and componentWillUnmount in React classes, but unified into a single API.

In this example from the guide it's expected that count is 0 only on initial render:

const [count, setCount] = useState(0);

So it will work as componentDidUpdate with additional check:

useEffect(() => {
  if (count)
    document.title = `You clicked ${count} times`;
}, [count]);

This is basically how custom hook that can be used instead of useEffect may work (updated for the use with strict mode):

function useDidUpdateEffect(fn, inputs) {
  const isMountingRef = useRef(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    isMountingRef.current = true;
  }, []);

  useEffect(() => {
    if (!isMountingRef.current) {
      return fn();
    } else {
      isMountingRef.current = false;
    }
  }, inputs);
}
16
  • 8
    Where is the suggestion for useRef over setState? I don't see it on this page and I would like to understand why.
    – rob-gordon
    Jun 24, 2019 at 15:09
  • 11
    @rob-gordon This was a comment that was deleted after the answer was updated. The reasoning is that useState woukld result in unnecessary component update. Jun 24, 2019 at 15:18
  • 2
    This approach works, but it violates the react-hooks/exhaustive-deps linter rule. I.e. fn is not given in the array of deps. Anyone have an approach that doesn't violate React best practices? Oct 1, 2019 at 22:22
  • 15
    @JustinLang React linter rules != best practices, they only try to address common hook problems. ESLint rules aren't intelligent and may result in false positives or negatives. As long as the logic behind a hook is correct, a rule can be safely ignored with eslint-disable or eslint-disable-next comment. In this case fn shouldn't be provided as input. See the explanation, reactjs.org/docs/… . If something inside fn introduces deps, it's more like they should be provided as inputs directly. Oct 2, 2019 at 11:33
  • 4
    Note: If you are using multiple useEffects that check for didMountRef, make sure only the last one (on bottom) is setting didMountRef to false. React goes through useEffects in order!
    – Dror Bar
    Apr 18, 2021 at 11:07
115

Here's a custom hook that just provides a boolean flag to indicate whether the current render is the first render (when the component was mounted). It's about the same as some of the other answers but you can use the flag in a useEffect or the render function or anywhere else in the component you want. Maybe someone can propose a better name.

import { useRef, useEffect } from 'react';

export const useIsMount = () => {
  const isMountRef = useRef(true);
  useEffect(() => {
    isMountRef.current = false;
  }, []);
  return isMountRef.current;
};

You can use it like:

import React, { useEffect } from 'react';

import { useIsMount } from './useIsMount';

const MyComponent = () => {
  const isMount = useIsMount();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (isMount) {
      console.log('First Render');
    } else {
      console.log('Subsequent Render');
    }
  });

  return isMount ? <p>First Render</p> : <p>Subsequent Render</p>;
};

And here's a test for it if you're interested:

import { renderHook } from '@testing-library/react-hooks';

import { useIsMount } from '../useIsMount';

describe('useIsMount', () => {
  it('should be true on first render and false after', () => {
    const { result, rerender } = renderHook(() => useIsMount());
    expect(result.current).toEqual(true);
    rerender();
    expect(result.current).toEqual(false);
    rerender();
    expect(result.current).toEqual(false);
  });
});

Our use case was to hide animated elements if the initial props indicate they should be hidden. On later renders if the props changed, we did want the elements to animate out.

8
  • Import changed from react-hooks-testing-library to @testing-library/react-hooks github.com/testing-library/react-hooks-testing-library/releases/… Jul 15, 2019 at 23:28
  • 3
    Why did you choose "isMount" and not "didMount" or "isMounted" ?
    – vsync
    Nov 7, 2019 at 10:33
  • 7
    Guess I was thinking about whether the current render is the render where the mount was happening. Ya I agree, it sounds a little weird coming back to it now. But it's true on the first render and false after so your suggestions sound misleading. isFirstRender could work. Nov 7, 2019 at 17:29
  • 6
    Thanks for the hook! I agree with @ScottyWaggoner , isFirstRender is a better name
    – abumalick
    Apr 11, 2020 at 12:12
  • Thanks for your answer. I am using your hook the way like first value false, after mounting true and renamed didMount :) May 30, 2020 at 15:49
38

I found a solution that is more simple and has no need to use another hook, but it has drawbacks.

useEffect(() => {
  // skip initial render
  return () => {
    // do something with dependency
  }
}, [dependency])

This is just an example that there are others ways of doing it if your case is very simple.

The drawback of doing this is that you can't have a cleanup effect and will only execute when the dependency array changes the second time.

This isn't recommended to use and you should use what the other answers are saying, but I only added this here so people know that there is more than one way of doing this.

Edit:

Just to make it more clear, you shouldn't use this approach to solving the problem in the question (skipping the initial render), this is only for teaching purpose that shows you can do the same thing in different ways. If you need to skip the initial render, please use the approach on other answers.

4
  • 2
    I just learned something. I didn't think this would work, then I tried and it actually does. Thank you! Apr 11, 2020 at 21:30
  • 2
    React should provide a better way for this, but this issue is open on Github and the proposal is to write a custom solution yourself (which is utter non-sense).
    – Trace
    Jul 12, 2020 at 11:18
  • 1
    The problem with that one is that it will be executed on unMount as well, which is not perfect.
    – Nick Alves
    Jul 21, 2020 at 21:16
  • 1
    @ncesar if this was the only answer that worked, probably you are doing something wrong, because the other answer are the correct ones and mine is just for teaching purpos
    – Vencovsky
    Dec 4, 2020 at 11:43
37

I use a regular state variable instead of a ref.

// Initializing didMount as false
const [didMount, setDidMount] = useState(false)

// Setting didMount to true upon mounting
useEffect(() => { setDidMount(true) }, [])

// Now that we have a variable that tells us wether or not the component has
// mounted we can change the behavior of the other effect based on that
const [count, setCount] = useState(0)
useEffect(() => {
  if (didMount) document.title = `You clicked ${count} times`
}, [count])

We can refactor the didMount logic as a custom hook like this.

function useDidMount() {
  const [didMount, setDidMount] = useState(false)
  useEffect(() => { setDidMount(true) }, [])

  return didMount
}

Finally, we can use it in our component like this.

const didMount = useDidMount()

const [count, setCount] = useState(0)
useEffect(() => {
  if (didMount) document.title = `You clicked ${count} times`
}, [count])

UPDATE Using useRef hook to avoid the extra rerender (Thanks to @TomEsterez for the suggestion)

This time our custom hook returns a function returning our ref's current value. U can use the ref directly too, but I like this better.

function useDidMount() {
  const mountRef = useRef(false);

  useEffect(() => { mountRef.current = true }, []);

  return () => mountRef.current;
}

Usage

const MyComponent = () => {
  const didMount = useDidMount();

  useEffect(() => {
    if (didMount()) // do something
    else // do something else
  })

  return (
    <div>something</div>
  );
}

On a side note, I've never had to use this hook and there are probably better ways to handle this which would be more aligned with the React programming model.

2
  • 14
    useRef is better suited for that because useState will cause an additional and useless render of the component: codesandbox.io/embed/youthful-goldberg-pz3cx Aug 19, 2019 at 17:45
  • you have an error in your useDidMount Function. You have to encapsulate the mountRef.current = true in useEffect() with curly brackets { ...}. Leaving them is like writing return mountRef.current = true, and that cause an error like An effect function must not return anything besides a function, which is used for clean-up. You returned: true
    – suther
    Nov 13, 2020 at 8:00
29

Let me introduce to you react-use.

npm install react-use

Wanna run:

only after first render? -------> useUpdateEffect

only once? -------> useEffectOnce

check is it first mount? -------> useFirstMountState

Want to run effect with deep compare, shallow compare or throttle? and much more here.

Don't want to install a library? Check the code & copy. (maybe a star for the good folks there too)

Best thing is one less thing for you to maintain.

6
  • 4
    Looks like a really good package
    – yalcinozer
    Jan 12, 2022 at 8:46
  • 2
    Fantastic resource, so glad I found this!
    – drichar
    Mar 31, 2022 at 6:22
  • Unclear what's the difference between useUpdateEffect & useUpdateEffect? Both run only once
    – vsync
    May 15, 2023 at 12:46
  • It's a very bloated library and it's unclear if it was made with tree-shaking in mind. Also it bloats the node_modules if all you need is to run useEffect not on mount...
    – vsync
    May 15, 2023 at 12:47
  • Unclear what's the difference between useUpdateEffect & useUpdateEffect? Both run only once Do you mean useUpdateEffect and useEffectOnce? useUpdateEffect is exactly like useEffect but skip the first run. Use can see it here: github.com/streamich/react-use/blob/master/docs/…
    – cYee
    May 16, 2023 at 1:44
9

A TypeScript and CRA friendly hook, replace it with useEffect, this hook works like useEffect but won't be triggered while the first render happens.

import * as React from 'react'

export const useLazyEffect:typeof React.useEffect = (cb, dep) => {
  const initializeRef = React.useRef<boolean>(false)

  React.useEffect((...args) => {
    if (initializeRef.current) {
      cb(...args)
    } else {
      initializeRef.current = true
    }
  // eslint-disable-next-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
  }, dep)
}
5

Here is my implementation based on Estus Flask's answer written in Typescript. It also supports cleanup callback.

import { DependencyList, EffectCallback, useEffect, useRef } from 'react';

export function useDidUpdateEffect(
  effect: EffectCallback,
  deps?: DependencyList
) {
  // a flag to check if the component did mount (first render's passed)
  // it's unrelated to the rendering process so we don't useState here
  const didMountRef = useRef(false);

  // effect callback runs when the dependency array changes, it also runs
  // after the component mounted for the first time.
  useEffect(() => {
    // if so, mark the component as mounted and skip the first effect call
    if (!didMountRef.current) {
      didMountRef.current = true;
    } else {
      // subsequent useEffect callback invocations will execute the effect as normal
      return effect();
    }
  }, deps);
}

Live Demo

The live demo below demonstrates the different between useEffect and useDidUpdateEffect hooks

Edit 53179075/with-useeffect-how-can-i-skip-applying-an-effect-upon-the-initial-render

3

I was going to comment on the currently accepted answer, but ran out of space!

Firstly, it's important to move away from thinking in terms of lifecycle events when using functional components. Think in terms of prop/state changes. I had a similar situation where I only wanted a particular useEffect function to fire when a particular prop (parentValue in my case) changes from its initial state. So, I created a ref that was based on its initial value:

const parentValueRef = useRef(parentValue);

and then included the following at the start of the useEffect fn:

if (parentValue === parentValueRef.current) return;
parentValueRef.current = parentValue;

(Basically, don't run the effect if parentValue hasn't changed. Update the ref if it has changed, ready for the next check, and continue to run the effect)

So, although other solutions suggested will solve the particular use-case you've provided, it will help in the long run to change how you think in relation to functional components.

Think of them as primarily rendering a component based on some props.

If you genuinely need some local state, then useState will provide that, but don't assume your problem will be solved by storing local state.

If you have some code that will alter your props during a render, this 'side-effect' needs to be wrapped in a useEffect, but the purpose of this is to have a clean render that isn't affected by something changing as it's rendering. The useEffect hook will be run after the render has completed and, as you've pointed out, it's run with every render - unless the second parameter is used to supply a list of props/states to identify what changed items will cause it to be run subsequent times.

Good luck on your journey to Functional Components / Hooks! Sometimes it's necessary to unlearn something to get to grips with a new way of doing things :) This is an excellent primer: https://overreacted.io/a-complete-guide-to-useeffect/

2

You can use custom hook to run use effect after mount.

const useEffectAfterMount = (cb, dependencies) => {
  const mounted = useRef(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    if (mounted.current) {
      return cb();
    }
    mounted.current = true;
  }, dependencies); // eslint-disable-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
};

Here is the typescript version:

const useEffectAfterMount = (cb: EffectCallback, dependencies: DependencyList | undefined) => {
  const mounted = useRef(false);

  useEffect(() => {
    if (mounted.current) {
      return cb();
    }
    mounted.current = true;
  }, dependencies); // eslint-disable-line react-hooks/exhaustive-deps
};

Example:

useEffectAfterMount(() => {
  document.title = `You clicked ${count} times`;
}, [count])
1
  • You have inversed true and false, it's const mounted = useRef(false) and then mounted.current = true
    – Mik378
    Feb 16, 2023 at 15:15
1

1、I choose the npm package ahooks to solve my issue, you should run npm i ahooks first.
2、Then in your code

  import { useUpdateEffect } from "ahooks";
  useUpdateEffect(() => {
    // do something if deps change but skipping the initial render.
  }, deps);
0

Below solution is similar to above, just a little cleaner way i prefer.

const [isMount, setIsMount] = useState(true);
useEffect(()=>{
        if(isMount){
            setIsMount(false);
            return;
        }
        
        //Do anything here for 2nd render onwards
}, [args])
2
  • 3
    This is not an ideal way of doing this as setting state causes another render
    – Daniel
    Jan 31, 2021 at 1:18
  • Causes a needless re-render. useRef solution is preferable.
    – vsync
    May 15, 2023 at 12:49

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