I am currently exploring the possibility of extracting country name from Author Affiliations (PubMed Articles) my sample data looks like:

Mechanical and Production Engineering Department, National University of Singapore.

Cancer Research Campaign Mammalian Cell DNA Repair Group, Department of Zoology, Cambridge, U.K.

Cancer Research Campaign Mammalian Cell DNA Repair Group, Department of Zoology, Cambridge, UK.

Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285.

Initially I tried to remove punctuations and split the vector into words and then compared it with a list of country names from Wikipedia but I am not successful at this.

Can anyone please suggest me a better way of doing it? I would prefer the solution in R as I have to do further analysis and generate graphics in R.

  • 1
    You might do better if you preprocess the file outside of R, save it as CSV and then use R for the rest of it. Google Refine is a great tool for this kind of job. – edmz Mar 15 '11 at 21:30
  • Google Refine also works good! Thanks for the suggestion! – Shreyas Karnik Mar 16 '11 at 17:06
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is a simple solution that might get you started some of the way. It makes use of a database containing city and country data in the maps package. If you can get hold of a better database, it should be simple to modify the code.

library(maps)
library(plyr)

# Load data from package maps
data(world.cities)

# Create test data
aa <- c(
    "Mechanical and Production Engineering Department, National University of Singapore.",
    "Cancer Research Campaign Mammalian Cell DNA Repair Group, Department of Zoology, Cambridge, U.K.",
    "Cancer Research Campaign Mammalian Cell DNA Repair Group, Department of Zoology, Cambridge, UK.",
    "Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN 46285."
)

# Remove punctuation from data
caa <- gsub(aa, "[[:punct:]]", "")    ### *Edit*

# Split data at word boundaries
saa <- strsplit(caa, " ")

# Match on cities in world.cities
# Assumes that if multiple matches, the last takes precedence, i.e. max()
llply(saa, function(x)x[max(which(x %in% world.cities$name))])

# Match on country in world.countries
llply(saa, function(x)x[which(x %in% world.cities$country.etc)])

This is the result for cities:

[[1]]
[1] "Singapore"

[[2]]
[1] "Cambridge"

[[3]]
[1] "Cambridge"

[[4]]
[1] "Indianapolis"

And the result for countries:

[[1]]
[1] "Singapore"

[[2]]
[1] "UK"

[[3]]
[1] "UK"

[[4]]
character(0)

With a bit of data cleanup you may be able to do something with this.

  • With an external geocoding service you may have found the fourth one, but your solution is very nice and stays inside R. I would have upvoted if I had some votes left :-) – juba Mar 15 '11 at 21:57
  • @juba Thanks. One can expand on this solution. For example, if a city is found but a country isn't, one can look up the country for the found city in world.cities – Andrie Mar 15 '11 at 22:03
  • caa<-gsub("[[:punct:]\n]","",aa) # Works str_replace_all was not working also llply should be replaced with lapply thanks a lot @Andrie – Shreyas Karnik Mar 15 '11 at 23:50
  • @Neo_me Sorry about str_replace_all() - this is found in package stringr, and is a wrapper for gsub. Thanks for reminding me about [:punct:] which is clearly better. Finally, lapply and llply are equivalent and its a matter of taste. – Andrie Mar 16 '11 at 7:20

One way could be to split your strings in order to isolate geographical information (for example by deleting everything up to the first coma), and then submit the result to a geocoding service.

For example, Google geocoding API allows to send an address and to get back a localization and the corresponding geographical informations, such as the country. I don't think there is a ready-made R package to do it, but you can find some functions here, for example :

Geocoding in R with Google Maps

There are also extensions in other languages such as Ruby :

http://geokit.rubyforge.org/

It also depends on the number of observations you have, the free Google API for example is limited to about 200 adresses / IP / day, if I remember correctly.

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