36

Sometimes I need to start an async job which works very slow. I don't care if that job success and I need to continue working on my current thread.

Like sometimes I need to send an Email or SMS which works very slow. I need to respond to the web client as soon as possible so I don't want to await it.

I have googled this question and some articles suggest me to write like this:

// This method has to be async
public async Task<Response> SomeHTTPAction()
{
    // Some logic...
    // ...

    // Send an Email but don't care if it successfully sent.
    Task.Run(() =>  _emailService.SendEmailAsync());
    return MyRespond();
}

Or like this:

// This method has to be async
public async Task<Response> SomeHTTPAction()
{
    // Some logic...
    // ...

    // Send an Email but don't care if it successfully sent.
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>  _emailService.SendEmailAsync());
    return MyRespond();
}

There will be a warning says: before the call is completed. Consider applying the 'await' operator to the result of the call.

So what if I really awaited it? What is the best practice in C# to 'fire and forget', just call an async method without waiting for its complete?

6
  • 1
    Just don't mark the function as async, so the function shouldn't expect its result to be awaited?
    – Amadan
    Nov 7, 2018 at 3:59
  • 3
    Possible duplicate of How to safely call an async method in C# without await Nov 7, 2018 at 4:00
  • The better approach is to have these operations run out of process i.e. publish to some queue like rabbitmq and have a subscriber pick up these messages and then send off emails/sms
    – JohanP
    Nov 7, 2018 at 4:00
  • What information have you found so far? A quick google for "C# async fire and forget" shows there is a lot of resource available for this.. Nov 7, 2018 at 4:00
  • Isn't this really a problem of design? What's the point of returning MyRespond before you know the operation to be complete or not?
    – MickyD
    Nov 7, 2018 at 4:51

6 Answers 6

31

If you truly just want to fire and forget. Simply don't call use await.

// It is a good idea to add CancellationTokens
var asyncProcedure = SomeHTTPAction(cancellationToken).ConfigureAwait(false);

// Or If not simply do:
var asyncProcedure = SomeHTTPAction().ConfigureAwait(false);

If you want to use the result output later its gets trickier. But if it is truly fire and forget the above should work

A Cancellation token allows interrupts and canceling procedures. If you are using Cancellation token you will need to use it everywhere from the retrieval straight through to the calling method (Turtles all the way down).

I used ConfigureAwait(false) to prevent deadlocks. Here for more information

2
  • 1
    @MickyD Mainly because of how OP had it, but with this you can then retrieve the value at a later time by using .GetAwaiter().GetResult()
    – Cornelis
    Nov 7, 2018 at 8:27
  • why we use cancellationToken and how to use ? Jul 1, 2021 at 11:18
29

A standalone discard is the best way to avoid this warning.

_ = Task.Run(() =>  _emailService.SendEmailAsync());

Discards are dummy variables and can be used to ignore the Task object returned by an asynchronous operation.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/discards#a-standalone-discard

1
  • This answer is correct. I am downvoting only because it is very similar to an earlier answer by MrMaavin. Oct 31, 2020 at 2:36
7

As Amadan told in the comment that, you need to remove async from your function. then it will stop giving you the warning.

// This method has to be async
public Response SomeHTTPAction()
{
     // Some logic...
     // ...
     // Send an Email but don't care if it successfully sent.
     Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>  _emailService.SendEmailAsync());
     return MyRespond();
}

and Task.Factory.StartNew(() => _emailService.SendEmailAsync()); will indeed work on a new thread.

6

If you need to use async in your function you can also use a discard variable and don't use await. This is also usefull if you have multiple async function calls but you don't need to wait for all of them.

public async function(){
    var tmp = await asyncfunction();
    ...
    _ = _httpClient.PutAsync(url, content);
    ...
}
0

It all depends on what your Async method accepts. Normally it will accept a "special" class that also holds an event. You can subscribe your callback method to that event and pass it along with the method. When it's finished, your callback method will be called.

An example of this (for sockets) would be:

    public void CreateSocket()
    {
        Socket s = new Socket(AddressFamily.InterNetwork, SocketType.Stream, ProtocolType.Tcp);
        SocketAsyncEventArgs sockAsync = new SocketAsyncEventArgs();
        sockAsync.Completed += SockAsync_Completed;

        s.ConnectAsync(sockAsync);
    }

    private void SockAsync_Completed(object sender, SocketAsyncEventArgs e)
    {
        //Do stuff with your callback object.
    }

It all depends on what the method you are trying to call can accept. I would look at the documentation for more help on that specifically.

-1

I am curious why this hasn't been suggested.

new Thread(() =>
{
    Thread.CurrentThread.IsBackground = true;
    //what ever code here...e.g.
    DoSomething();
    UpdateSomething();
}).Start();  

It just fires off a separate thread.

1
  • 4
    This will create a new thread and run method(s) on that new thread , which is quite expensive/resource consuming. Not an answer to the related question.
    – naltun
    Oct 9, 2020 at 3:23

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