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If a package is not available for .Net Core how do we enforce strict .Net runtime version checking during, Install-Package command?

Install-package command, why does Visual Studio even, restores .Net 4.6.1 version, just to give a runtime error at later stages!

I'm sure VS team has thought about it and there must be a reason! As well as a mechanism to validate & strict runtime version checking during Install-Package.

Warnings:

Warning NU1701 Package 'Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.Core 2.2.2' was restored using '.NETFramework,Version=v4.6.1' instead of the project target framework '.NETStandard,Version=v2.0'. This package may not be fully compatible with your project.

Edit: I just took one of the full .net framework packages, as example.

Intention was to ask how to prevent it from happening in Nuget package manager.

Warning NU1701 Package <any full .net framework package> was restored using '.NETFramework,Version=v4.6.1' instead of the project target framework '.NETStandard,Version=v2.0'. This package may not be fully compatible with your project.

  • I think the reason is mostly that many (most?) NuGet packages that don't specifically target .NET Standard are still compatible. – Joey Nov 7 '18 at 12:48
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    You added the wrong package. That's not the Identity package for .NET Core. The correct one is Microsoft.AspNetCore.Identity. – Panagiotis Kanavos Nov 8 '18 at 14:42
  • @Stijn not a good duplicate. In this case the OP simply added the wrong package – Panagiotis Kanavos Nov 8 '18 at 14:47
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    @Abhijeet It is possible to add a Full Framework assembly to a .NET Core project, as a short-term compatibility workaround. That's why you get a warning instead of an error. The warning is clear too - the package you added doesn't contain a target for .NET Core itself. – Panagiotis Kanavos Nov 8 '18 at 14:49
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    That package does not have any dependencies listed, which means it does not have a .NET Core/Standard version inside. Since many .NET Framework based packages can safely be used from .NET Core, at most you could ask for a parameter that would enable such strict checking. However, since most of this is never going to be automated, there's a developer invoking this install, then this simply falls on that developer to be aware of and handle. – Lasse V. Karlsen Nov 8 '18 at 14:51
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It's explained by Microsoft in this GitHub issue. Quoting the relevant part:

[...]

Whenever you use NuGet packages that go through the compat shim you'll get a warning like this:

Warning NU1701: Package 'Huitian.PowerCollections 1.0.0' was restored using '.NETFramework,Version=v4.6.1' instead of the project target framework '.NETCoreApp,Version=v2.0'. This package may not be fully compatible with your project.

We've made sure you get this warning every time you build (rather only during package restore) to ensure you don't accidentally overlook it.

The idea here is that we have no way of knowing whether the .NET Framework binary will actually work. For example, it might depend on WinForms. To make sure you don't waste your time troubleshooting something that cannot work, we let you know that you're potentially going off the rails. Of course, warnings you have to overlook are annoying. Thus, we recommend that you test your application/library and if you're convinced everything is working fine, you suppress the warning:

[...]

So if the package works, then you can suppress the warning. If it doesn't, you'll have to use a different package or wait for the package to support your target framework.

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