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I am trying to allocate memory to a 2d character array as I determine its size. (the count is assumed to be an unknown value) it seems to work until something starts to reassign garbage data to the array

0xd28fe280 -> 3
0xd28fe280 -> 3
0xd28fe280 -> 3
0xd28fe280 -> 3
0xd28fe280 -> ���[U
0xd28fe280 -> ���[U

what essentially what I want to do is allocate memory just before I populate the array with strings.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(){
  int count = 6;
  char **words;
  words = malloc(0);
  for(int i = 0;i < count; i++){
    words[i] = malloc(10);
    strcpy(words[i],"3");
    printf("%#08x -> %s\n",words[0],words[0]);
  }
  free(words);
  return 0;
}
20
  • 2
    I'd say its time to learn how to use a debugger. – Swordfish Nov 7 '18 at 20:11
  • 8
    uniquNodes = malloc(0); Ahm ... – Osiris Nov 7 '18 at 20:13
  • 3
    uniquNodes = malloc(0); ... uniquNodes[count] = ... is UB as uniquNodes does not point to sufficient memory. – chux - Reinstate Monica Nov 7 '18 at 20:15
  • 2
    @TormundGiantsbane While it is nonsense it is actually still legal. – Osiris Nov 7 '18 at 20:23
  • 2
    char pairs[numPairs][2][10]; seems like a recipe for disaster. Have you considered using an array of struct containing the pairs? – David C. Rankin Nov 7 '18 at 20:25
1

It is actually not a 2D array, it is a pointer to a character pointer (char **).

words point to a block of char *, where each element of this block points to a char block. You only have allocated memory for the char blocks, but not for the char * block. (You have allocated it with size 0 so you can not access it). You also need to free every block you allocated, otherwise the memory is leaked. It would be also good practice to check the return value of malloc, since it returns NULL if it fails and further dereferencing a NULL pointer will lead to undefined behavior.

This should work:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
    int count = 6, max_len = 10, words_n = 0;
    char **words = NULL;

    for(int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        words = realloc(words, ++words_n * sizeof *words);
        if(!words)
        {
            //Error handling
            return -1;
        }
        words[i] = malloc(max_len * sizeof *words[i]); 
        if(!words[i])
        {
            //Error handling
            return -1;
        }
        strncpy(words[i], "3", max_len); //Better to protect against overflows.
        words[i][max_len-1] = '\0';
        printf("%p -> %s\n", (void*)words[0], words[0]); //"%p" for printing pointers.
    }

    for(int i=0; i<count; i++)
    {
        free(words[i]); //Free every allocated element.
    }
    free(words);

    return 0;
}
3
  • @SpeedrunnerG55 Its similar to that, but i have adjusted my answer. Note that the return value of realloc needs to be assigned to the pointer since the place can change. – Osiris Nov 8 '18 at 16:40
  • since i believe *words[i] is a char would sizeof *words[i] always be 1, could just do words[i] = malloc(max_len)? – SpeedrunnerG55 Nov 8 '18 at 17:57
  • 1
    @SpeedrunnerG55 Yes i only wrote it like that to be consistent. – Osiris Nov 8 '18 at 18:07

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