Is there markdown syntax for the equivalent of:

Take me to <a href="#pookie">pookie</a>

... 

<a name="pookie">this is pookie</a>
up vote 558 down vote accepted
Take me to [pookie](#pookie)

should be the correct markdown syntax to jump to the anchor point named pookie.

To insert an anchor point of that name use HTML:

<a name="pookie"></a>

Markdown doesn't seem to mind where you put the anchor point. A useful place to put it is in a header. For example:

### <a name="tith"></a>This is the Heading

works very well. (I'd demonstrate here but SO's renderer strips out the anchor.)

Note on self-closing tags and id= versus name=

An earlier version of this post suggested using <a id='tith' />, using the self-closing syntax for XHTML, and using the id attribute instead of name.

XHTML allows for any tag to be 'empty' and 'self-closed'. That is, <tag /> is short-hand for <tag></tag>, a matched pair of tags with an empty body. Most browsers will accept XHTML, but some do not. To avoid cross-browser problems, close the tag explicitly using <tag></tag>, as recommended above.

Finally, the attribute name= was deprecated in XHTML, so I originally used id=, which everyone recognises. However, HTML5 now creates a global variable in JavaScript when using id=, and this may not necessarily be what you want. So, using name= is now likely to be more friendly.

(Thanks to Slipp Douglas for explaining XHTML to me, and nailer for pointing out the HTML5 side-effect — see the comments and nailer's answer for more detail. name= appears to work everywhere, though it is deprecated in XHTML.)

  • 1
    You can't see how to link to your heading demo after StackOverflow renders the HTML because their rendered is stripping out your <a> tag. That is, you can't in StackOverflow Markdown. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 13 '12 at 18:58
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    However, this will work in other, more-liberal Markdown renderers, but you'll need a closing <a> tag; the <a> tag doesn't allow self-closing. Also, I found my browser to skip past the header unless the <a> tag is before the header's contents. Corrections made to your examples. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 13 '12 at 19:22
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    Hold up there, cowboy. Just because you don't have any styling on an <a> without an href doesn't mean that it's self closing. Unless I'm completely farking insane, both of these: test-xhtml11 and [sln.6bitt.com/public/test-html5.html](test-html5) render the rest of the page within the <a> tag. Go ahead and inspect with a web inspector of your choice. – Slipp D. Thompson Apr 21 '12 at 0:33
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    @Slipp: OK I think I understand, now. You coded <a id="hi"/> rest of doc, but it was treated like <a id="hi"> rest of doc</a>. (And the element analysis of the page shows this, too.) My mistake: I looked at the elements displayed not the raw source. Do you think the answer should be modified, in light of this observation? – Steve Powell May 16 '12 at 13:56
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    The name attribute also creates global variables (see stackoverflow.com/questions/3434278/…), so you might as well use the id attribute as the target of fragment identifier URLs, as intended. – Bobby Jack Jun 15 '15 at 9:22

On bitbucket.org the voted solution wouldn't work. Instead, when using headers (with ##), it is possible to reference them as anchors by prefixing them as #markdown-header-my-header-name, where #markdown-header- is an implicit prefix generated by the renderer, and the rest is the lower-cased header title with dashes replacing spaces.

Example

## My paragraph title

will produce an implicit anchor like this

#markdown-header-my-paragraph-title

The whole URL before each anchor reference is optional, i.e.

[Some text](#markdown-header-my-paragraph-title)

is equivalent of

[Some text](https://bitbucket.org/some_project/some_page#markdown-header-my-paragraph-title) 

provided that they are in the same page.

Source: https://bitbucket.org/tutorials/markdowndemo/overview (edit source of this .md file and look at how anchors are made).

  • 1
    This may do as well. According to this: confluence.atlassian.com/bitbucket/…, bitbucket supports the Table of Contents extension which can auto-generate links and anchors based on the document headers. The TOC extension is documented here: pythonhosted.org/Markdown/extensions/toc.html Add the text "[TOC]" to the beginning of the document for it to be generated. – Binary Phile Jun 29 '16 at 19:47
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    In Github, ## My paragraph title will produce the following anchor user-content-my-paragraph-title, so you can reference it with [Some text](#user-content-my-paragraph-title). However, I haven't found official documentation for this. – toto_tico Jul 11 '16 at 23:02
  • This helped me on Bitbucket as well - works like a charm. – Scott Byers Jul 28 '16 at 21:41
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    This is useful information; thank you. However, markdown renderers without the extensions won't generate these anchors for you, and clashing heading names will result in clashing anchor ids (or some unhelpful distinguishing trick, like number suffices). Explicit anchor ids are better, more controllable, not subject to random changes due to text updates (see trick above) and useful for anchoring more than just headers. Both techniques are needed in general. – Steve Powell Sep 18 '16 at 14:55
  • On stackedit.io [linky](#header) was a sufficient anchor, and worked when published to Gist, too. – Felipe Alvarez May 18 '17 at 4:15

Use a name. Using an id isn't necessary in HTML 5 and will create global variables in your JavaScript

See the HTML 5 specification, 5.9.8 Navigating to a fragment identifier - both id and name are used.

It's important to know that most browsers still turn IDs into global variables. Here's a quick test. Using a name avoids creating globals and any conflicts that may result.

Example using a name:

Take me to [pookie](#pookie)

And the destination anchor:

### <a name="pookie"></a>Some heading
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    Downvoting. The global variable argument is weak since you shouldn't be (directly) defining global variables in your JS anyway, so no conflict will happen. Also, the semantics of name and id are different. – Marnen Laibow-Koser Sep 11 '14 at 18:22
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    @MarnenLaibow-Koser Nobody is discussing defining global variables in JS. Making an ID in HTML creates a global window.someid in most browsers. – mikemaccana Sep 12 '14 at 9:42
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    @MarnenLaibow-Koser Many libraries (i.e., not your own JS, but someone else's) use a single global - for example, fineuploader. If you make an element with an ID of fineuploader, you will be unable to use the fineuploader module. Avoiding creating unnecessary globals helps avoid those conflicts. – mikemaccana Sep 14 '14 at 13:34
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    I would be interested to run some tests of that case and find out which one takes precedence. I appreciate the theoretical issue, but in years of client-side development, I've never had an ID break any client-side JS (provided the HTML was otherwise valid). I'll continue to use them when they're semantically appropriate until I run into actual problems. – Marnen Laibow-Koser Mar 2 '15 at 2:16
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    @MarnenLaibow-Koser I (and many others) have had HTML IDs break real JavaScript - there's one very practical example in the comment you're replying to! There's many styleguides and companies that always use classes, even for singletons, and this is why. – mikemaccana Jan 4 '16 at 13:48

There's no readily available syntax to do this in the original Markdown syntax, but Markdown Extra provides a means to at least assign IDs to headers — which you can then link to easily. Note also that you can use regular HTML in both Markdown and Markdown Extra, and that the name attribute has been superseded by the id attribute in more recent versions of HTML.

  • +1 for PHP Markdown Extra. – user2188875 Apr 17 '14 at 2:03

Markdown Anchor supports the hashmark, so a link to an anchor in the page would simply be [Pookie](#pookie)

Generating the anchor is not actually supported in Gruber Markdown, but is in other implementations, such as Markdown Extra.

In Markdown Extra, the anchor ID is appended to a header or subhead with {#pookie}.

Github Flavored Markdown in Git repository pages (but not in Gists) automatically generates anchors with several markup tags on all headers (h1, h2, h3, etc.), including:

  • id="user-content-HEADERTEXT"
  • class="anchor"
  • href="#HEADERTEXT"
  • aria-hidden="true" (this is for an svg link icon that displays on mouseover)

Excluding the aria/svg icon, when one writes:

  • # Header Title

Github generates:

  • <h1><a id="user-content-header-title" class="anchor" href="#header-title">Header Title</a></h1>

Therefore, one need do nothing to create the header links, and can always link to them with:

  • Link to the [Header Title](#header-title)

Late to the party, but I think this addition might be useful for people working with rmarkdown. In rmarkdown there is built-in support for references to headers in your document.

Any header defined by

# Header

can be referenced by

get me back to that header(#header)

The following is a minimal standalone .rmd file that shows this behavior. It can be knitted to .pdf and .html.

---
title: "references in rmarkdown"
output:
  html_document: default
  pdf_document: default
---

# Header

Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. Write some more text. 

Go back to that [header](#header).

For most common markdown generators. You have a simple self generated anchor in each header. For instance with pandoc, the generated anchor will be a kebab case slug of your header.

 echo "# Hello, world\!" | pandoc
 # => <h1 id="hello-world">Hello, world!</h1>

Depending on which markdown parser you use, the anchor can change (take the exemple of symbolrush and La muerte Peluda answers, they are different!). See this babelmark where you can see generated anchors depending on your markdown implementation.

Using the latest Markdown, you should be able to use the following syntax:

[](){:name='anchorName'}

This should create the following HTML:

<a name="anchorName"></a>

If you wanted the anchor to have text, simply add the test within the square brackets:

`Some Text{:name='anchorName'}

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