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Well, both questions are concerned towards my compiling output, since I try to remove all warnings..

To the first question:
I'm xor'ing float values, compiler output: warning: dereferencing type-punned pointer will break strict-aliasing rules [-Wstrict-aliasing]

inline float ClassXY::GetFloat(void) const
{
    uint32_t xored = *(uint32_t*)&m_pParent->m_Value.m_fValue ^ (uint32_t)this; // compiler warning for this line
    return *(float*)&xored;
}

m_pParent is a pointer to this class ClassXY *m_pParent;
m_Value is a var of a struct and m_fValue is defined as a float inside the struct.

Any idea how to get around the warning? (I know that I can disable the warning, but I have no idea to get a clean solution to it)

My second qustion would be:
The scenario is nearly the same though, only with int. Compiler is talking about information loss: warning: cast from ‘const ClassXY*’ to ‘uint32_t {aka unsigned int}’ loses precision [-fpermissive]
Without the -fpermissive compiler flag, I wouldn't be able to compile..

inline int ClassXY::GetInt(void) const
{
    return (int)(m_pParent->m_Value.m_nValue ^ (int)this); // compiler warning for this line
}

And again, any idea on how to fix this?
Or is it inpossible without warnings, what I'm trying to accomplish?

To give you all an idea what it is about: auto example = g_pClassXY->FindVar("example_var");
Then: float float_val = example->fValue; // direct access, value is wrong
To get the value right, the right approach would be: float float_val = example->GetFloat();

Thanks in advance!

  • 3
    This is really just something you shouldn't be doing---there's no guarantee that the bytes that make up an int value will also constitute a valid float value or vice versa, and in fact int and float may have different sizes. I think you should explain what you're trying to accomplish if you want good answers. – Brian Nov 8 '18 at 0:02
  • 2
    ClassXY::GetInt() and the xor with this looks like an attempt at creating a hash for an instance? I don't think it's the warning you should battle. What is the function supposed to deliver? – Ted Lyngmo Nov 8 '18 at 0:07
  • The instance holds hashed values, with the getter's I want to make sure that on the end side, the value gets read-able again (that's why it gets 'un-xored') – Stefan Nov 8 '18 at 0:09
  • @M.M But with this way I'm completely losing one type, later conversion loses information aswell though – Stefan Nov 8 '18 at 0:18
  • "what I'm trying to accomplish?" -- it would help if you explain what you are trying to accomplish – M.M Nov 8 '18 at 0:19
2

To avoid a strict aliasing violation, the code could be:

static_assert( sizeof(float) <= sizeof(uint32_t), "size problem" );
uint32_t xored{};
memcpy(&xored, &m_pParent->m_Value.m_fValue, sizeof xored);
xored ^= reinterpret_cast<uint32_t>(this);

float ret;
memcpy(&ret, &xored, sizeof ret);
return ret;

However there are still some issues:

  • The code is ill-formed on a system where this is a 64-bit pointer.
  • The float values involved might be an invalid bit pattern for float, causing undefined behaviour.

If your intent is to "encrypt" a float, then the encrypted value should be stored as uint32_t or a byte array, not as float.

The first bullet point could be addressed by generating a random 32-bit mask for each instance, instead of using this; or using uintptr_t instead of uint32_t.

  • I see, I think I'm getting your point. Well to give you an idea what it is about: auto example = g_pClassXY->FindVar("example_var"); Then: float float_val = example->fValue; // direct access, value is wrong To get the value right, the right approach would be: float float_val = example->GetFloat(); – Stefan Nov 8 '18 at 0:24
  • 1
    @Stefanx3 fValue should be private if it is not correct to access it directly from outside. You also haven't explained what all this shenanigans is about, why don't you just store the value without this masking? – M.M Nov 8 '18 at 0:25
  • Because the member is not private, it is masked, in my designed program. I guess, my design idea is just bad here, though I wanted it this way originally. (to try something new and to widen my knowledge) – Stefan Nov 8 '18 at 0:30

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