0

I have to write a method that accepts a string and returns true if the brackets aren't empty, parentheses, and curly brackets close correctly It returns false otherwise.

Here is what I've got:

  def empty_brackets?(string)
    %w[ () [] {} ].none?(&string.method(:include?))
  end

  def valid_string?(string)
    match_count = 0

    string.each_char do |c|
      match_count += 1 if [ '[', '{', '(' ].include?(c)
      match_count -= 1 if [ ']', '}', ')' ].include?(c)
    end
    match_count == 0
  end

I think my valid_string? method is not quite SOLID but most importantly it doesn't pass the test where brackets are in wrong order, like )somebrackets(. Could you please advise how to fix it?

3

My attempt, pushing all opening brackets in an array, popping closing ones if they match:

BRACKET_PAIRS = { '[' => ']', '{' => '}', '(' => ')' }

def valid?(string)
  string.each_char.with_object([]) do |char, bracket_stack|
    if BRACKET_PAIRS.keys.include? char
      bracket_stack << char
    elsif BRACKET_PAIRS.values.include? char
      if char != BRACKET_PAIRS[bracket_stack.last]
        return false
      else
        bracket_stack.pop
      end
    end
  end.empty?
end
  • 1
    I hope you don't mind I did a little refactoring. – Schwern Nov 8 '18 at 0:32
1

Here's a very efficient version. It uses regex, and pulls out all of your braces ({}[]()) into a small array, and then keeps widdling down your pairs until there's nothing left. The second it finds an unmatched pair, it quits and returns false. It also doesn't split the string into a char array, as that will use twice the memory (once for the whole string, and once again for the string split into individual characters).

BRACKET_PAIRS = { '{' => '}', '[' => ']', '(' => ')' }
BRACKET_REGEX = /#{BRACKET_PAIRS.to_a.flatten.map { |v| Regexp.escape(v) }.join('|')}/

def valid?(string)
  brackets = string.scan(BRACKET_REGEX)
  while brackets.size > 0
    first = brackets.shift
    last = brackets.pop
    return(false) unless BRACKET_PAIRS[first] == last
  end

  return(true)
end

This code will return true if there are no braces at all.

If you don't like that, do this:

BRACKET_PAIRS = { '{' => '}', '[' => ']', '(' => ')' }
BRACKET_REGEX = /#{BRACKET_PAIRS.to_a.flatten.map { |v| Regexp.escape(v) }.join('|')}/

def valid?(string)
  brackets = string.scan(BRACKET_REGEX)
  return(false) unless brackets.size > 0 # this line is added

  while brackets.size > 0
    first = brackets.shift
    last = brackets.pop
    return(false) unless BRACKET_PAIRS[first] == last
  end

  return(true)
end

As a side note, you'll want to avoid making arrays in loops like you did in your example:

string.each_char do |c|
  match_count += 1 if [ '[', '{', '(' ].include?(c)
  match_count -= 1 if [ ']', '}', ')' ].include?(c)
end

This code will create two arrays and 6 strings per character in your string variable. This is very inefficient and you'll use a lot more RAM and CPU than necessary. You want to at the very least make those two arrays outside the loop, since they don't change, and ideally even make them a constant so that you don't even make them every time you call the method. Make them one when your program boots up and use it forever. Little things like this actually make a really big difference, especially when used in a loop.

  • Good call about not splitting string into an array, I tend to forget about using #each_char over #chars. – Marcin Kołodziej Nov 8 '18 at 1:50
  • 1
    @MarcinKołodziej I actually didn't use each_char in my answer either, though you're totally right, using each_char is more efficient than chars.each, since it doesn't make a new array. I recently learned about each_key and each_value in a hash as well, which is again nice as opposed to keys.each or values.each because again you aren't making pointless arrays. The more work you can save the garbage collector, the better. Especially if your Ruby version is older. – Nate Nov 8 '18 at 1:53
  • 1
    You didn't, but I did and I went back to correct that. Anyway, it's nice to see someone caring about not instantiating multiple temporary data structures in Ruby. – Marcin Kołodziej Nov 8 '18 at 1:56
  • 1
    RuboCop is definitely nice, but be careful about it sometimes, especially when it comes to performance, this particular issue comes to mind: github.com/rubocop-hq/rubocop/issues/3633 – Marcin Kołodziej Nov 8 '18 at 2:04
  • 1
    Yeah, we definitely fight the "style" cops sometimes, though I didn't realize .zero? was slower than == 0. Thanks for the info! – Nate Nov 8 '18 at 2:07
1
CLOSE_TO_OPEN = { ']'=>'[', '}'=>'{', ')'=>'(' }

def valid?(str)
  str.each_char.with_object([]) do |c,stack|
    case c
    when '[', '{', '('
      stack << c
    when ']', '}', ')'
      return false unless stack.pop == CLOSE_TO_OPEN[c]
    end
  end.empty?
end

valid? "[a]{b[c{d}e]fg}" #=> true
valid? "[a]{b[c{d]e}fg}" #=> false

The behaviour of the method can be seen by adding some puts statements.

def valid?(str)
  str.each_char.with_object([]) do |c,stack|
    puts "c=#{c}, stack=#{stack}"
    case c
    when '[', '{', '('
      stack << c
      puts "  stack after 'stack << #{c}' = #{stack}"
    when ']', '}', ')'
      print "  stack.pop (#{stack.last||'nil'})==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[#{c}] " +
            "(#{CLOSE_TO_OPEN[c]})=>"
      puts stack.last == CLOSE_TO_OPEN[c] ? "true, so continue" :
        "false, so return false"
      return false unless stack.pop == CLOSE_TO_OPEN[c]
    end
  end.tap { |stack| puts "At end, '#{stack}.empty?` (#{stack.empty?})" }.empty?
end

valid? "[a]{b[c{d}e]fg}"
c=[, stack=[]
  stack after 'stack << [' = ["["]
c=a, stack=["["]
c=], stack=["["]
  stack.pop ([)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[]] ([)=>true, so continue
c={, stack=[]
  stack after 'stack << {' = ["{"]
c=b, stack=["{"]
c=[, stack=["{"]
  stack after 'stack << [' = ["{", "["]
c=c, stack=["{", "["]
c={, stack=["{", "["]
  stack after 'stack << {' = ["{", "[", "{"]
c=d, stack=["{", "[", "{"]
c=}, stack=["{", "[", "{"]
  stack.pop ({)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[}] ({)=>true, so continue
c=e, stack=["{", "["]
c=], stack=["{", "["]
  stack.pop ([)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[]] ([)=>true, so continue
c=f, stack=["{"]
c=g, stack=["{"]
c=}, stack=["{"]
  stack.pop ({)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[}] ({)=>true, so continue
At end, '[].empty?` (true)
  #=> true

valid? "[a]{b[c{d]e}fg}"
c=[, stack=[]
  stack after 'stack << [' = ["["]
c=a, stack=["["]
c=], stack=["["]
  stack.pop ([)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[]] ([)=>true, so continue
c={, stack=[]
  stack after 'stack << {' = ["{"]
c=b, stack=["{"]
c=[, stack=["{"]
  stack after 'stack << [' = ["{", "["]
c=c, stack=["{", "["]
c={, stack=["{", "["]
  stack after 'stack << {' = ["{", "[", "{"]
c=d, stack=["{", "[", "{"]
c=], stack=["{", "[", "{"]
  stack.pop ({)==CLOSE_TO_OPEN[]] ([)=>false, so return false
  #=> false

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.