I am working on a class that makes it easy for me to build sql statements. One idea that I came up with was to use operator overloading to allow me to add different value types to my sql statement. That being said, the problem is that for some reason, each time I call the operator again, it seems to overwrite the effects of the previous call. Here is my code:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class sql
{
    string query;

  public:
    sql();
    void add(int i);
    void end();
    void print();
    void add_string(string str);
    sql operator+(const string &str) const;
    sql operator+(const int &i) const;
};

sql::sql()
{
    this->query = "";
}

sql sql::operator+(const int &i) const
{
    sql result;
    result.add(i);
    return result;
}

sql sql::operator+(const string &str) const
{
    sql result;
    result.add_string(str);
    return result;
}

void sql::add_string(string str)
{
    this->query = this->query + "'" + str + "',";
}

void sql::add(int i)
{
    query = query + to_string(i) + ",";
}

void sql::end()
{
    query += ";";
}

void sql::print()
{
    cout << this->query;
}

int main()
{
    sql s;
    string s1("terry");
    int i = 10;
    s = s + s1;
    s.print();
    cout << endl;
    s = s + i;
    s.print();
}

The output that I expect is:

'terry',
'terry',10,

But instead is:

'terry',
10, 

Why does the second use of the + operator override the effects of the first?

up vote 1 down vote accepted
sql sql::operator+(const int &i) const
{
    sql result;

creates a new, empty sql

    result.add(i);

adds integer to empty sql

    return result;
}

The given sql, this, has not been used. Instead,

sql sql::operator+(const int &i) const
{
    sql result(*this);

copy construct a new sql based on the current sql

    result.add(i);

add i to the sql that contains the previous sql's contents.

    return result;
}

You'll want to do the same to

sql sql::operator+(const string &str) const

If you look carefully at operator + implementation it will be obvious that it does not make use of left side object.

sql sql::operator+(const string &str) const
{
    sql result;
    result.query = this->query; // concat whatever was stored in the left-side object
    result.add_string(str);
    return result;
}

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