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 typedef int mat[n][n] //(size_t is defined as unsigned long, which is 8 bytes on x84-64 machines)

 int ele(mat a, size_t i, size_t j){
     return a[i][j];
 }

Suppose this generate the following assembly code:

   ele:
     salq $6, %rsi  // i= i<< 6 = 64i
     addq %rsi, %rdi // a= a + i = a +64i
     movl(%rdi, %rdx, 4), %eax // result = a + 4*j = a + 64i + 4j = a + 8*8*i + 8*1/2*j, since the size(t) = 8

The goal is find n = ____ ? I came up n = 8, you can see my steps in comments. However, the correct answer is n = 16. Can anyone help me find where is the mistake

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  • size_t is the type of the indexes i and j. It's not the type of the array. The pointer arithmetic is being done using the type of the array. BTW, you will never, ever see a 1/2 being used in C pointer arithmetic. – user3386109 Nov 8 '18 at 5:47
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    The code shown won't compile — no definition of n and no semicolon at the end of the typedef. It's hard to discuss broken code. Please fix it! – Jonathan Leffler Nov 8 '18 at 5:49
  • @JonathanLeffler it is pseudo. And then it is "please recheck sizeof (int)" – Antti Haapala Nov 8 '18 at 5:54
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    @Gahlot Simply. sizeof(int) is 4 on x86-64 platforms. 64 / 4 == 16 – Antti Haapala Nov 8 '18 at 5:55
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result = a + 64i + 4j = a + 8*8*i + 8*1/2*j, since the size(t) = 8

Your expansion here using 8 is wrong. Look at it this way.

a + 64i + 4j = a + 16*4i + 4j

Here a is base address of array. i is row selector. Each row contains 16 elements of size 4 (sizeof int) and you skip i such rows to get the base address of the ith row. Then you skip 4j bytes (j ints) to reach the column you want.

I don't know what your end objective is, but if all you wanted to do was find n, then you could simply have done

sqrt(sizeof(mat)/sizeof(int))

assuming you are sure that it is an int array of square shape.

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  • so basically, we just need to ignore "size_t is defined as unsigned long" ? – boomken Nov 8 '18 at 6:14
  • the size of size_t is reflected in the instruction itself. salq addq movl : These instructions specify that the address computation is happening using 8 bytes, but the actual address will always be independent of the size of the variable computing it. It depends only on target size. – Siddhesh Rane Nov 8 '18 at 6:44

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