3

For asynchronous communication in MPI which of the following is better (in terms of performance, reliability, readability, etc.):

  • MPI_Isend with buffer and then MPI_Iprobe & MPI_Recv once the receiver is ready, or
  • MPI_Irecv with buffer (such that there is always and MPI_Irecv posted with sufficient buffer) and then MPI_Send when the sender is ready?

The communication scenario is that data has to be exchanged asynchronously and the arrival times do not matter and both processes have workload. Only the overall performance (especially no blocking) is considered.

Below is a minimal working example (I did not include workload and the timings are thus probably not meaningful).

#include <mpi.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) {
  MPI_Init(NULL, NULL);
  int world_size, world_rank;

  MPI_Comm_size(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &world_size);
  MPI_Comm_rank(MPI_COMM_WORLD, &world_rank);

  if (world_rank == 0 && world_size != 2) {
    fprintf(stderr, "This example requires two MPI processes.\n");
    MPI_Abort(MPI_COMM_WORLD, EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  /* Non Blocking Send */
  int buf[100] = {0};

  MPI_Barrier(MPI_COMM_WORLD);
  double time = MPI_Wtime();
  if (world_rank == 1) {
    MPI_Request request;
    MPI_Isend(buf, 100, MPI_INT, 0, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &request);
    MPI_Wait(&request, MPI_STATUS_IGNORE);
  } else {
    MPI_Recv(buf, 100, MPI_INT, 1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD, MPI_STATUS_IGNORE);
  }
  time = MPI_Wtime() - time;
  printf("rank = %d, time = %f sec\n", world_rank, time);
  MPI_Barrier(MPI_COMM_WORLD);

  usleep(100);
  if (world_rank == 0) {
    printf("---\n");
  }

  /* Non Blocking Receive */
  MPI_Barrier(MPI_COMM_WORLD);
  time = MPI_Wtime();
  if (world_rank == 1) {
    MPI_Send(buf, 100, MPI_INT, 0, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
  } else {
    MPI_Request request;
    MPI_Irecv(buf, 100, MPI_INT, 1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD, &request);
    MPI_Wait(&request, MPI_STATUS_IGNORE);
  }
  time = MPI_Wtime() - time;
  printf("rank = %d, time = %f sec\n", world_rank, time);
  MPI_Barrier(MPI_COMM_WORLD);

  MPI_Finalize();
  return 0;
}

On my machine this generates:

rank = 0, time = 0.000035 sec
rank = 1, time = 0.000036 sec
---
rank = 0, time = 0.000035 sec
rank = 1, time = 0.000026 sec

Thank you already for your answers and have a nice day :)

1
  • 1
    The latter avoids unexpected messages (that could cause an increased memory usage). Also, keep in mind MPI_Send() might block if no matching receive has been posted. These are two reasons to go with the second option. Nov 8, 2018 at 9:30

1 Answer 1

1

A general rule of thumb is to:

  1. Receive data, in a buffer. This action is quick but you might wait for the message to arrive,
  2. Send some data, in a buffer again; which is a long step.

Doing it the other around is not bad, however, you could overlap the sending and receiving better.

For this reason, one should go for the second case scenario you describe. Also, if you do not use non-blocking communication, be careful of deadlocks. For deadlocks, see MPI Send and receive questions.

Exercise for the reader:

In the following fragments assume that all buffers have been allocated with sufficient size. Moreover, rank and size denote the rank of each process and the total number of MPI processes, respectively. For each fragment note whether it deadlocks or not and explain why. Report performance issues.

snippet 1:

int ireq = 0;
for (int p=0; p<size; p++)
if (p!=rank)
MPI_Isend(sbuffers[p],buflen,MPI_INT,p,0,comm,&(reqs[ireq++]));
for (int p=0; p<size; p++)
if (p!=rank)
MPI_Recv(rbuffer,buflen,MPI_INT,p,0,comm,MPI_STATUS_IGNORE);
MPI_Waitall(size-1,reqs,MPI_STATUSES_IGNORE);

snippet 2:

int ireq = 0;
for (int p=0; p<size; p++)
if (p!=rank)
MPI_Irecv(rbuffers[p],buflen,MPI_INT,p,0,comm,&(reqs[ireq++]));
MPI_Waitall(size-1,reqs,MPI_STATUSES_IGNORE);
for (int p=0; p<size; p++)
if (p!=rank)
MPI_Send(sbuffer,buflen,MPI_INT,p,0,comm);

Solution:

The snippet 1 suffers from performance issue, invert recv and send.

The snippet 2 has a deadlock due to Waitall.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.