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I am using the 'bife' package to run the fixed effect logit model in R. However, I cannot compute any goodness-of-fit to measure the model's overall fit given the result I have below. I would appreciate if I can know how to measure the goodness-of-fit given this limited information. I prefer chi-square test but still cannot find a way to implement this either.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------                 
    Fixed effects logit model                   
    with analytical bias-correction                 

    Estimated model:                    
    Y ~ X1 +X2 + X3 + X4 + X5 | Z                   

    Log-Likelihood= -9153.165                   
    n= 20383, number of events= 5104                    
    Demeaning converged after 6 iteration(s)                    
    Offset converged after 3 iteration(s)                   

    Corrected structural parameter(s):                  

        Estimate    Std. error  t-value Pr(> t) 
    X1  -8.67E-02   2.80E-03    -31.001 < 2e-16 ***
    X2  1.79E+00    8.49E-02    21.084  < 2e-16 ***
    X3  -1.14E-01   1.91E-02    -5.982  2.24E-09    ***
    X4  -2.41E-04   2.37E-05    -10.171 < 2e-16 ***
    X5  1.24E-01    3.33E-03    37.37   < 2e-16 ***
    ---                 
    Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1                  

    AIC=  18730.33 , BIC=  20409.89                     


    Average individual fixed effects= 1.6716                    
    ---------------------------------------------------------------                 
  • 1
    Exactly what kind of goodness-of-fit measures are you after? It's possible to extract residuals from bife objects and you may also estimate different specifications. So you are not so restricted after all. – Julius Vainora Nov 10 '18 at 16:45
  • Julius Vainora: I prefer chi-square test. – Eric Nov 11 '18 at 17:45
6
+50

Let the DGP be

n <- 1000
x <- rnorm(n)
id <- rep(1:2, each = n / 2)
y <- 1 * (rnorm(n) > 0)

so that we will be under the null hypothesis. As it says in ?bife, when there is no bias-correction, everything is the same as with glm, except for the speed. So let's start with glm.

modGLM <- glm(y ~ 1 + x + factor(id), family = binomial())
modGLM0 <- glm(y ~ 1, family = binomial())

One way to perform the LR test is with

library(lmtest)
lrtest(modGLM0, modGLM)
# Likelihood ratio test
#
# Model 1: y ~ 1
# Model 2: y ~ 1 + x + factor(id)
#   #Df  LogLik Df  Chisq Pr(>Chisq)
# 1   1 -692.70                     
# 2   3 -692.29  2 0.8063     0.6682

But we may also do it manually,

1 - pchisq(c((-2 * logLik(modGLM0)) - (-2 * logLik(modGLM))),
           modGLM0$df.residual - modGLM$df.residual)
# [1] 0.6682207

Now let's proceed with bife.

library(bife)
modBife <- bife(y ~ x | id)
modBife0 <- bife(y ~ 1 | id)

Here modBife is the full specification and modBife0 is only with fixed effects. For convenience, let

logLik.bife <- function(object, ...) object$logl_info$loglik

for loglikelihood extraction. Then we may compare modBife0 with modBife as in

1 - pchisq((-2 * logLik(modBife0)) - (-2 * logLik(modBife)), length(modBife$par$beta))
# [1] 1

while modGLM0 and modBife can be compared by running

1 - pchisq(c((-2 * logLik(modGLM0)) - (-2 * logLik(modBife))), 
           length(modBife$par$beta) + length(unique(id)) - 1)
# [1] 0.6682207

which gives the same result as before, even though with bife we, by default, have bias correction.

Lastly, as a bonus, we may simulate data and see it the test works as it's supposed to. 1000 iterations below show that both test (since two tests are the same) indeed reject as often as they are supposed to under the null.

enter image description here

  • 1
    The vector modBife$par$beta contains all the beta coefficients (not fixed effects, no intercept). When testing modBife0 (full model) vs. modBife (only fixed effects), it is exactly those beta coefficients that we set to zero. So, if I understand your question correctly, length(modBife$par$beta) in the the regular output would correspond to the number of variables: 5 in your example (X1, ..., X5). – Julius Vainora Nov 11 '18 at 21:24
  • 1
    I'll also jump ahead to explain length(modBife$par$beta) + length(unique(id)) - 1. Here we are testing the full model against only the intercept. Then the reason for length(modBife$par$beta) remains the same. Next, we set all the fixed effects to zero, and there are length(unique(id)) of them. But in the full model we also don't have the intercept. So, from length(unique(id)) non-beta coefficients we go to 1 (intercept), hence the length(unique(id)) - 1 degrees of freedom. – Julius Vainora Nov 11 '18 at 21:31
  • 1
    In my example, for instance, we have a1*id1 + a2*id2 + b1*x in the full model (where a1 and a2 are fixed effects, id1 and id2 are individual dummy variables). Then the minimal model would be just intercept*1. So, the number of degrees of freedom = 2 = 1 (beta) + 2 (fixed effects) - 1 (intercept is coming back). In other words, while there are length(unique(id)) fixed effects, we lose one degree of freedom due to the restriction that all those dummy variables always sum to 1. – Julius Vainora Nov 11 '18 at 21:42
  • 2
    @Eric, re 1st comment: length(unique(Z)) being 207 should make sense (I'll add test simulation results today or tomorrow in this case). Re 2nd comment: right, that's a value to report, and indeed chi square takes larger value with more degrees of freedom. My id is just like your Z: they are fixed effects (dummy variables for each individual or, in your case, each time period) with estimated values given at modBife$par$alpha. Re R^2: in logistic regression there no longer is a clear R^2; there are multiple proposals. One is McFadden's R^2, given by c(1- logLik(modBife) / logLik(modGLM0)). – Julius Vainora Nov 11 '18 at 22:29
  • 1
    @Eric, coming back to length(unique(Z)), everything is fine, except you need to keep in mind the ratio n / length(unique(Z)). The larger it is the better. Otherwise the test may perform poorly. – Julius Vainora Nov 12 '18 at 18:30

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