My data is similar to the following:

 id   year     var
10052 1980 2264758272
10052 1981 2434758400
10052 1982 2474758400
10052 1983 2484758272
10052 1984 2404758272
10052 1985 2344758272
10052 1986          .
10052 1987          .
10052 1988          .
10052 1989          .
10052 1990 2264758272
10052 1991 2374758400
10052 1992 2364758272
10052 1993 2334758400
10052 1995 2234758400
10052 1996          .
10052 1997          .
10052 1998          .
10052 1999          .
10052 2000          .
10052 2001          .
10052 2002 2174758400
10052 2003 1994758400
10067 1980          .
10067 1981          .

I want to identify spells of successive missing values and interpolate those that are 4 years or less.

The code below interpolates all missing values instead:

ipolate var year if missing(var)<=4 , generate(var1)

How can I do this in Stata?

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using your example data:

clear

input id year var
10052 1980 2264758272
10052 1981 2434758400
10052 1982 2474758400
10052 1983 2484758272
10052 1984 2404758272
10052 1985 2344758272
10052 1986          .
10052 1987          .
10052 1988          .
10052 1989          .
10052 1990 2264758272
10052 1991 2374758400
10052 1992 2364758272
10052 1993 2334758400
10052 1995 2234758400
10052 1996          .
10052 1997          .
10052 1998          .
10052 1999          .
10052 2000          .
10052 2001          .
10052 2002 2174758400
10052 2003 1994758400
10067 1980          .
10067 1981          .
end

The following works for me:

bysort id (year): generate idspell = sum(missing(var) != missing(var[_n-1]))
bysort id idspell (year): generate lenspell = _N

ipolate var year if !missing(var) | lenspell <= 4, generate(var1)

What the above code snippet does is to first identify each spell, then calculate its length and then use this in interpolate.

Results:

format %10.0f var var1
list, sepby(id)

     +-------------------------------------------------------------+
     |    id   year          var   idspell   lenspell         var1 |
     |-------------------------------------------------------------|
  1. | 10052   1980   2264758272         1          6   2264758272 |
  2. | 10052   1981   2434758400         1          6   2434758400 |
  3. | 10052   1982   2474758400         1          6   2474758400 |
  4. | 10052   1983   2484758272         1          6   2484758272 |
  5. | 10052   1984   2404758272         1          6   2404758272 |
  6. | 10052   1985   2344758272         1          6   2344758272 |
  7. | 10052   1986            .         2          4   2328758272 |
  8. | 10052   1987            .         2          4   2312758272 |
  9. | 10052   1988            .         2          4   2296758272 |
 10. | 10052   1989            .         2          4   2280758272 |
 11. | 10052   1990   2264758272         3          5   2264758272 |
 12. | 10052   1991   2374758400         3          5   2374758400 |
 13. | 10052   1992   2364758272         3          5   2364758272 |
 14. | 10052   1993   2334758400         3          5   2334758400 |
 15. | 10052   1995   2234758400         3          5   2234758400 |
 16. | 10052   1996            .         4          6            . |
 17. | 10052   1997            .         4          6            . |
 18. | 10052   1998            .         4          6            . |
 19. | 10052   1999            .         4          6            . |
 20. | 10052   2000            .         4          6            . |
 21. | 10052   2001            .         4          6            . |
 22. | 10052   2002   2174758400         5          2   2174758400 |
 23. | 10052   2003   1994758400         5          2   1994758400 |
     |-------------------------------------------------------------|
 24. | 10067   1980            .         0          2   2264758272 |
 25. | 10067   1981            .         0          2   2434758400 |
     +-------------------------------------------------------------+

EDIT:

As @NickCox points out, presumably interpolation should be done separately by id.

If this is what you want then you need to add the bysort prefix to the interpolate command:

bysort id: ipolate var year if !missing(var) | lenspell <= 4, generate(var1)

@Pearly Spencer has given a good direct answer to the question asked, but more information is needed to allow an even better one. The point of this answer is to expand on what is wrong with the code in the question and also to do what can't be done well in a comment, to flag related graphical technique.

missing() returns 1 or 0 depending on the value of its argument in each observation. You're hoping that it counts locally within a spell, but that's a long way from what it does.

As missing() returns 1 or 0, its results are always less than 4, so specifying that condition rules out none of the observations, as you found out. Note also that if missing(var) would select the missing values only, leaving ipolate nothing to work with.

Incidentally, the data look very odd: e.g. modulo 1000 only two values occur, 400 and 272. Otherwise they're supposedly exact integers of the order of 2 billion. There may be some story here that makes interpolation suspect or a different kind of interpolation more appropriate. (Interpolation is much more than linear interpolation, its simplest flavour.)

With your example data, only one identifier has usable data. Here I just interpolate for that panel with no restriction on length of intervals. (Denying yourself interpolated values within longer spells of missings seems arbitrary. Just plot the results: sometimes they will make sense within longer intervals.)

bysort id: ipolate var year, generate(wanted)  

scatter var year, msymbol(Oh) || scatter wanted year if missing(var), msymbol(+) /// 
ylabel(2e9 "2" 2.2e9 "2.2" 2.4e9 "2.4", angle(horizontal)) ///
legend(ring(0) col(1) position(7)) ytitle(whatever (billions)) 

enter image description here

From a graph, I note:

  1. No value for 1994.

  2. Behaviour seems stick-and-slip, with small changes and big changes. Interpolation is going to work best with a smooth gradual change of response.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.