1

I have a Perl function:

my %d;

$d{"aaaa"}->{t1} = "9:49";
$d{"bbbb"}->{t1} = "9:30";

foreach my $k (sort { ($d{$a}->{t1}) <=> ($d{$b}->{t1}) } keys %d)
{
    print "$k:  $d{$k}->{t1}\n";
}

I want to sort by t1, so 9:30 before 9:49 and I want to get the result:

bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

but the result is not suitable.

It seems like the result is random?

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
aaaa:  9:49
bbbb:  9:30

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
bbbb:  9:30
aaaa:  9:49

C:\tmp>a.pl
aaaa:  9:49
bbbb:  9:30

enter image description here

  • 6
    Enabling warnings would give you a hint to the problem – ysth Nov 8 '18 at 16:56
  • can't reproduce the problem on mac with 5.18.2 . Did a loop of 10000 repeats and the ordering is consistent – Vorsprung Nov 8 '18 at 16:58
  • I add a loop in the program, but get 10000 same result. – user2434977 Nov 9 '18 at 0:37
2

You need to use cmp instead of <=> since you are comparing strings. The comments are correct and we need to take into consideration 10+ hours. You need to use sprintf to add leading zero when hours are less than 10 to have strings sorted correctly.

foreach my $k (sort { sprintf("%05s", ($d{$a}->{t1})) cmp sprintf("%05s", ($d{$b}->{t1})) } keys %d) {
  • 1
    Comparing by strings (naively, anyway) would put 10:00 before 9:00, though. You need something that handles such time strings specifically. – chepner Nov 8 '18 at 17:03
  • 1
    If you want to sort by "clock times", you could do sort { my ($h_a, $m_a) = split /:/, $d{$a}{t1}; my ($h_b, $m_b) = split /:/, $d{$b}{t1}; $h_a <=> $h_b || $m_a <=> $m_b } keys %d. This would still of course not understand things like AM and PM and day changes. – Grinnz Nov 8 '18 at 17:06
  • 1
    Or if these are (for example) minute:second durations, you could use List::UtilsBy like so: use List::UtilsBy 'nsort_by'; foreach my $k (nsort_by { my ($m, $s) = split /:/, $d{$_}{t1}; $m*60 + $s } keys %d) { ... } – Grinnz Nov 8 '18 at 17:28
  • @chepner: Valid point. Thank you. – Andrey Nov 8 '18 at 18:00
1

<=> is for comparing numbers, but your times have a colon, which makes them strings instead of numbers. One workaround is to just remove the colon, so that <=> can operate on them in number context.

use v5.10;

say "$_: $d{$_}->{t1}" for sort { $d{$a}->{t1} =~ s/://r <=> $d{$b}->{t1} =~ s/://r } keys %d;

The r modifier on the substitution means return the new value without altering the old value.

  • solved, thanks! – user2434977 Nov 9 '18 at 0:47
  • @user2434977 kindly mark the question as answered, thanks – beasy Nov 10 '18 at 18:25

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