56

I'm very new to the IntersectionObserver API, and I've been experimenting with this code:

let target = document.querySelector('.lazy-load');

let options = {
    root: null,
    rootMargin: '0px',
    threshold: 0
}

let observer = new IntersectionObserver(callback, options);

observer.observe(target);

function callback() {
    console.log('observer triggered.');
}

This seems to work as it should, and callback() is called whenever .lazy-load element enters the viewport, but callback() also fires once when the page is initially loaded, which triggers `console.log('observer triggered.');

Is there a reason for this callback to be triggered when the page loads? Or is there a mistake in how I'm implementing this?

Edit: Altering the code to the below still fires the callback at page load.

let target = document.querySelector('.lazy-load');

let options = {
    root: null,
    rootMargin: '0px',
    threshold: 0
}

let callback = function(entries, observer) {
    entries.forEach(entry => {

        console.log('observer triggered.');

    });
};

let observer = new IntersectionObserver(callback, options);

observer.observe(target);
1
  • I have a similar problem but with a threshold of 1.. So answers here don't apply
    – Tofandel
    Oct 10, 2021 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

80

That is the default behaviour. When you instantiate an instance of the IntersectionObserver, the callback will be fired.

It is recommended to guard against this case.

entries.forEach(entry => {
  if (entry.intersectionRatio > 0) {
    entry.target.classList.add('in-viewport');
  } else {
    entry.target.classList.remove('in-viewport');
  }
});

Also I found this article as well as the docs to be very helpful, specifically about the intersectionRatio or isIntersecting properties on the IntersectionObserverEntry.

· https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2018/01/deferring-lazy-loading-intersection-observer-api/

· https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/IntersectionObserver

· https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/IntersectionObserverEntry

6
  • Awesome answer. Thanks.
    – rpivovar
    Nov 20, 2018 at 2:18
  • 10
    I think is better to rely on isIntersecting because sometimes I've seen some cases where intersectingRatio was zero but isIntersecting was true ---which in my case was the correct behaviour.
    – zenw0lf
    May 26, 2020 at 19:31
  • 1
    @zenw0lf Great point! That is what I do here... github.com/snewcomer/intersection-observer-admin/blob/…
    – snewcomer
    Jun 3, 2020 at 2:37
  • Sad that you can't use the case when it's NOT intersecting to .unobserve() the element. Only with some ugly mutators that mark if the element has already been in the viewport
    – Daniel
    Jun 15, 2021 at 14:05
  • ' When you instantiate an instance of the IntersectionObserver, the callback will be fired'. My understanding is that the first time you call the observe method of the new IntersectionObserver then that invokes the callback. If you have a button to just invoke the observe method then that should asynchronously invoke the IntersectionObserver. Dec 28, 2021 at 9:31
4

as easy as it sounds I was able to fix the issue by

  1. adding a threshold comparison condition
  2. adding a slight delay for initialization of observer
    const options = {
      threshold: 1.0,
    };

      setTimeout(() => {
        observer = new IntersectionObserver(([entry]) => {
          console.log("OBSERVER TRIGGERED 1");

          if (
            entry &&
            entry.isIntersecting &&
            entry.intersectionRatio >= options.threshold
          ) {
            console.log("OBSERVER TRIGGERED 2");
          }
        }, options);

        observer.observe(observerRef.value);
      }, 2000);

I would also suggest temporary changing the background color for observable element to something like:

.observer {
  background-color: red;
}

and doing the page refresh. This way your might actually see the red background flashing on your screen hence triggering the event.

Now, before you throw tomatoes at me - in my case - I have a dozen of videos on the webpage. The video HTML elements are not "expanded" right away, because browser needs to download information about the poster images. Hence the page was loaded but vides were still loading one by one.. Adding a slight delay fixed the issue so the browser had time to expand the video contents.

2
2

I know its been a few years since this question was asked, but I was in a similar situation recently when working with a react component.

I was applying an intersection observer on a div, which I wanted to run only when the div was crossed while scrolling, but not on page load.

The general code I used to ignore the initial observer call was:

function Component() {
  const ref = useRef();
  const firstCallImminent = useRef(true);

  // This will run the callback once the component renders.
  useEffect(() => {
    const observer = new IntersectionObserver(
      () => {
        if (!firstCallImminent.current) {
          // Your logic here
        } else {
          firstCallImminent.current = false;
        }
      },
      {
        root: null,
        threshold: 0,
      }
    );
    observer.observe(ref.current);

    return () => {
      observer.disconnect();
      firstCallImminent.current = true;
    };
  }, []);

  return <div ref={ref}>...</div>;
}

The way this code works is this:

  1. The first time the Component renders, it creates 2 refs. One of them is a reference to the div of the returned jsx, the other (firstCallImminent) is used to track if the execution of the observer callback will be its initial execution. firstCallImminent will be initialized to true.

  2. Next, the useEffect callback will run to create a new intersection observer, with the callback:

() => {
  if (!firstCallImminent.current) {
    // Your logic here
  } else {
    firstCallImminent.current = false;
  }
}

In this callback, your logic will only run if the value of firstCallImminent.current is false. However, on the loading of this component, we had set it to be true. This means that the moment the observer begins observation (observer.observe(ref.current)), the first run of the callback will not execute your logic, and set the value of firstCallImminent.current to false instead.

Now, when the callback is run the next time, your logic will run.

  1. Lastly, we use a cleanup function:
() => {
    observer.disconnect();
    firstCallImminent.current = true;
  }

Say that for whatever reason, the useEffect callback needs to run again (maybe your logic had some stateful dependencies?). In that case, we would want that the previous observer disconnects.

In my case, I also wanted that when a new observer is made and applied, its callback should also omit the first execution of the callback, so, I also reset the value of firstCallImminent.current to true, so as to repeat the above process of skipping the first (or, in this case, next) call of the intersection observer's callback.

So.. this was the way I did this in React. In plain HTML, perhaps such a modification would work?:

let target = document.querySelector('.lazy-load');

let options = {
    root: null,
    rootMargin: '0px',
    threshold: 0
}

let firstCallImminent = true;

let observer = new IntersectionObserver(callback, options);

observer.observe(target);

function callback() {
    if(!firstCallImminent)
        console.log('observer triggered.');
    else
        firstCallImminent = false;
}

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