I am working on my gaming skills (mainly with arrays) to generate enemies and now bullets to take them down. I was able to set-up bullets while testing, but were visible only when I had a key pressed (space bar let's say) and with no interval in between, so the browser was not able to take that many at one point.

Is there any simple way to make the ship fire bullets with interval in between (not to load the browser that much) and maybe upon going to the enemy[i].x / y location to delete an enemy and the bullet can disappear ?

Here is the cleaned as much as possible code I have for now (HTML and JS file. Have some images as well and will provide URL to the game to check it if needed - http://sarahkerrigan.biz/spaceship

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Space Ship</title>
  </head>
  <body>
   <h3>Space Ship</h3>

   <canvas id="canvas" width="1000" height="600"></canvas>

   <script src="spaceship.js"></script>
  </body>
</html>

And here is the spaceship.js file:

var cvs = document.getElementById("canvas");
var ctx = cvs.getContext("2d");
//-------------------------------

// load images

var player = new Image();
var enemy = new Image();
var bullet = new Image();


player.src = "images/player.png";
enemy.src = "images/enemy.png";
bullet.src = "images/fire.png";
//-------------------------------

// vars
var score = 0;
var pause = 0;

var playerY = 300;
var playerX = 100;

var upPressed = false;
var downPressed = false;
var leftPressed = false;
var rightPressed = false;

// audio
var fire = new Audio();
var hit = new Audio();

fire.src = "sounds/fire.mp3";
hit.src = "sounds/hit.mp3";


//-------------------------------
// on key down
document.addEventListener("keydown", keyDownHandler);

function keyDownHandler(e) {
  if (e.keyCode == 87) {
    upPressed = true;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 83) {
    downPressed = true;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 65) {
    leftPressed = true;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 68) {
    rightPressed = true;
  }
}

// on key up
document.addEventListener("keyup", keyUpHandler);

function keyUpHandler(e) {
  if (e.keyCode == 87) {
    upPressed = false;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 83) {
    downPressed = false;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 65) {
    leftPressed = false;
  }
  if (e.keyCode == 68) {
    rightPressed = false;
  }
}




//-------------------------------



function moveUp() {
 if (playerY <= canvas.height - canvas.height){
 }
 else{
  playerY -= 6;
 }
}

function moveDown() {
 if (playerY >= canvas.height - player.height){
 }
 else{
  playerY += 6;
 }
}

function moveLeft() {
 if (playerX <= canvas.width - canvas.width){
 }
 else{
  playerX -= 6;
 }
}

function moveRight() {
 if (playerX >= canvas.width - player.width){
 }
 else{
  playerX += 6;
 }
}




//-------------------------------
// Enemy coordinates

var enemies = [];

enemies[0] = {
  x: cvs.width,
  y: 0
};

//-------------------------------

// reload page

function reLoad() {
  location.reload(); // reload the page
}


//-------------------------------
// draw images

function draw() {

  ctx.fillStyle = "black";
  ctx.fillRect(0, 0, canvas.width, canvas.height);

  if (upPressed === true) {
    moveUp();
  }
  if (downPressed === true) {
    moveDown();
  }
  if (leftPressed === true) {
    moveLeft();
  }
  if (rightPressed === true) {
    moveRight();
  }


//-------------------------------
  for (var i = 0; i < enemies.length; i++) {

    //draw the enemy
    ctx.drawImage(enemy, enemies[i].x, enemies[i].y);

    // enemy movement speed
    enemies[i].x -= 3;

    if (enemies[i].x == 880) {
      enemies.push({
        x: cvs.width,
        y: Math.floor(Math.random() * enemy.height) * 10 - enemy.height
      });
    }

    // detect collision

    // if enemy hits player
    if (playerX + player.width >= enemies[i].x && playerX <= enemies[i].x + enemy.width && (playerY <= enemies[i].y + enemy.height && playerY + player.height >= enemies[i].y)) {
      pause = 1;
    }
  }
//-------------------------------


  //draw the player
  ctx.drawImage(player, playerX, playerY);



  //draw score
  ctx.fillStyle = "#fff";
  ctx.font = "20px Verdana";
  ctx.fillText("Destroyed ships : " + score + "$", 10, cvs.height - 20);


  function onPause() {
    if (pause >= 1) {
      hit.play();
      ctx.fillStyle = "#df8a62";
      ctx.fillRect(150, 150, 280, 100);

      ctx.fillStyle = "#000";
      ctx.font = "20px Verdana";
      ctx.fillText("You died:", 165, 170);

      document.addEventListener("keydown", reLoad);
    } else if (pause <= 0) {
      requestAnimationFrame(draw);
    }
  }

  onPause();

}

draw();
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want to use time intervals instead of listeners.

var myVar = setInterval(timeCycle, 50);
function timeCycle() {
    //all the stuff you currently have listeners for.
}

This way when the time interval happens it will execute your key presses just once. Then if you want to change your rate of fire you add something like this:

setInterval(timeCycle, 50);
rateOfFire = 5;
shootCoolDown = 0;
function timeCycle() {
    if (shootPressed === true) {
        if(shootCoolDown === 0){
            shootCoolDown = rateOfFire;
            shoot();
        } 
    }
    if (shootCoolDown > 0){
        shootCoolDown --;
    }
}

This way it will shoot once every 5 game cycles (or 4-rounds per second in this case).

There are more fancy things you can do to create a delta-time system to offset lag by changing your sim rate based on the time it takes your timeCycle to execute, but that tends to be much more complex and easy to mess up, so I would not suggest going down that rabbit hole for beginners.

[EDIT] So, I've seen several questions recently about deltaTime, but don't see any good examples of how to implement it; so, here is a basic example I threw together. To implement it, just replace the GAME STUFF part with your actual code of what happens in a game cycle, and run all of your time-based values through the delta() function, and it will convert your values from to units per second to units per currentFrame.

My game us under a load of <input type="text" id="lag" value="100000000"> operations per frame.<br>
My speed is = <input type="text" id="speed" value="500"> px per second<br>
I moved <span id="adjusted"></span>px this frame.<br>
FPS: <span id="fps"></span>

<script>
function wrapDelta(lastTime){
   var d = new Date();
   var n = d.getSeconds()*1000 + d.getMilliseconds();
   if (lastTime >= n) {
        lastTime -= 60000;
   }
   return n - lastTime;
}

function delta(input){
   return input * deltaCoeff / 1000;
}

var d = new Date();
var ed = new Date();
var endTime =  d.getSeconds()*1000 + d.getMilliseconds();
var startTime =  d.getSeconds()*1000 + d.getMilliseconds();
var deltaCoeffMin = 25;
var deltaCoeff = deltaCoeffMin;

setInterval(function () {
    d = new Date();
    startTime =  d.getSeconds()*1000 + d.getMilliseconds();

    // START GAME STUFF
    var lag = Math.round(Math.sqrt(document.getElementById('lag').value)); //because comparing large numbers caused a wierd lag spike at from 9999999 to 10000000 
    var speed = document.getElementById('speed').value; 
    document.getElementById('adjusted').innerHTML = delta(speed);
    document.getElementById('fps').innerHTML = (1000/deltaCoeff).toFixed(2);
    var i; var j; var k; for (i=0; i<lag; i++){ for (j=0; j<lag; j++){ k = 1234567*1.1;}} //This is just a random math loop to simulate the lag cause by actual game stuff
    // END GAME STUFF

    ed = new Date();
    endTime = ed.getSeconds()*1000 + ed.getMilliseconds();
    deltaCoeff = endTime - startTime;
    if (deltaCoeff < deltaCoeffMin){deltaCoeff = deltaCoeffMin;}
  } , deltaCoeffMin);
</script>
  • Both suggestions are great and gave me better idea on how to handle events that should have intervals set. Thank you! Will try it as soon as I have some time to work on it and will update it here with the solution. – Todor Nov 8 at 20:00
  • I noticed that examples of deltaTime code are actually pretty hard to find; so, I add one in case you or anyone else decides they want to give it a shot. – Nosajimiki Nov 9 at 17:57

The call to requestAnimationFrame will run the draw function only at a rate supported by the monitor and only if the computer is fast enough. If the code is running slow, it will automatically skip a call to the draw function every now and then. Therefore, the draw function should only contain the rendering code and no logic.

You should first put any code that updates the game's state into another function called update. This function will be called at a consistent-ish rate using setInterval:

function update() {
    // read inputs
    // move objects
    // detect collisions
    // etc.

    // render a new frame only if the browser is done drawing the previous one
    requestAnimationFrame(draw);
}

// run the update function 60 times per second
var updateInterval = setInterval(update, 1000 / 60);

It's always good to store the updateInterval so that we can stop the game from running completely with clearInterval(updateInterval), but you might never need to use it.

Now that you have a somewhat consistent game speed, you can set a cooldown on the shooting like this:

if (fireCooldown > 0) {
  fireCooldown -= 1;
}

if (/* holding the fire key */ && fireCooldown === 0) {
  // create a projectile in front of the player ship
  fireCooldown = 30;
}

You'll need to declare that variable somewhere first with var fireCooldown = 0; somewhere, but it should get you started.

As mentioned by Jake Holzinger in the comments, setInterval isn't 100% accurate and the update function might be called a few milliseconds later than expected. You'd have to check the time between two calls yourself using Date objects or other means if you wanted to time stuff perfectly, but I doubt this is necessary for a simple shooter game.

  • 1
    setInterval is not guaranteed to run in exact intervals, the callback will sit in the event queue until it gets an opportunity to execute. A "consistent game speed" requires use of the time delta between ticks of the simulation loop. – Jake Holzinger Nov 8 at 19:56
  • @JakeHolzinger I am aware and Nosajimiki already mentioned it in their answer, but I tried keeping the introduction of new concepts to a minimum. I guess I could edit my wording to be more nuanced. – Jacque Goupil Nov 8 at 20:33

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