Consider the following DataFrames:

df1 = pd.DataFrame({'a': [0, 1, 2, 3], 'b': list('abcd')})
df2 = pd.DataFrame({'c': list('abcd'), 'd': 'Alex'})

In this instance, df1['b'] and df2['c'] are the key columns. So when merging:

df1.merge(df2, left_on='b', right_on='c')
   a  b  c     d
0  0  a  a  Alex
1  1  b  b  Alex
2  2  c  c  Alex
3  3  d  d  Alex

I end up with both key columns in the resultant DataFrame when I only need one. I've been using:

df1.merge(df2, left_on='b', right_on='c').drop('c', axis='columns')

Is there a way to only keep one key column?

One way is to set b and c as the index of your frames respectively, and use join followed by reset_index:

df1.set_index('b').join(df2.set_index('c')).reset_index()

   b  a     d
0  a  0  Alex
1  b  1  Alex
2  c  2  Alex
3  d  3  Alex

This will be faster than the merge/drop method on large dataframes, mostly because drop is slow. @Bill's method is faster than my suggestion, and @W-B & @PiRsquared easily outspeed the other suggestions:

import timeit

df1 = pd.concat((df1 for _ in range(1000)))
df2 = pd.concat((df2 for _ in range(1000)))

def index_method(df1 = df1, df2 = df2):
    return df1.set_index('b').join(df2.set_index('c')).reset_index()


def merge_method(df1 = df1, df2=df2):
    return df1.merge(df2, left_on='b', right_on='c').drop('c', axis='columns')

def rename_method(df1 = df1, df2 = df2):
    return df1.rename({'b': 'c'}, axis=1).merge(df2)

def index_method2(df1 = df1, df2 = df2):
    return df1.join(df2.set_index('c'), on='b')

def assign_method(df1 = df1, df2 = df2):
    return df1.set_index('b').assign(c=df2.set_index('c').d).reset_index()

def map_method(df1 = df1, df2 = df2):
    return df1.assign(d=df1.b.map(dict(df2.values)))

>>> timeit.timeit(index_method, number=10) / 10
0.7853091600998596
>>> timeit.timeit(merge_method, number=10) / 10
1.1696729859002517
>>> timeit.timeit(rename_method, number=10) / 10
0.4291436871004407
>>> timeit.timeit(index_method2, number=10) / 10
0.5037374985004135
>>> timeit.timeit(assign_method, number=10) / 10
0.0038641377999738325
>>> timeit.timeit(map_method, number=10) / 10
0.006620216699957382
  • 3
    df1.join(df2.set_index('c'), on='b') – piRSquared Nov 8 at 20:51
  • 2
    Would you like testing my speed ? – W-B Nov 8 at 20:55
  • 2
    @W-B, I just did, it's far faster! – sacul Nov 8 at 20:58
  • @sacul thank you :-) – W-B Nov 8 at 20:59

Another way is to give b and c the same name. At least for the merge operation.

df1.rename({'b': 'c'}, axis=1).merge(df2)
   a  c     d
0  0  a  Alex
1  1  b  Alex
2  2  c  Alex
3  3  d  Alex

Or use one set_index and left_index=True and right_on paramater:

df1.set_index('b').merge(df2, left_index=True, right_on='c')

Output:

   a  c     d
0  0  a  Alex
1  1  b  Alex
2  2  c  Alex
3  3  d  Alex

After set_index you ca directly assign the value

df1.set_index('b').assign(c=df2.set_index('c').d).reset_index()
Out[233]: 
   b  a     c
0  a  0  Alex
1  b  1  Alex
2  c  2  Alex
3  d  3  Alex

map

Obnoxious (not recommended) method that I was compelled to put down because I accidentally posted a duplicate answer to someone else.

df1.assign(d=df1.b.map(dict(df2.values)))

   a  b     d
0  0  a  Alex
1  1  b  Alex
2  2  c  Alex
3  3  d  Alex
  • Wait, why not use map in this case of bringing only one column? – ALollz Nov 8 at 21:11
  • 1
    Because it isn't generalized. It's very specific to this toy problem. If we truly were bringing over one column, then I'd agree. – piRSquared Nov 8 at 21:12

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.