First off, apologies for the confusing title.

What I am trying to achieve is the following: Suppose I have some function foo which takes a function and an integer as input. e.g.

int foo(int(*func)(), int i) {
    int n = func() + i;
    return n;
}

Now, I'd like to wrap this function in a python extension module. So I start writing my interface:

#include <Python.h>

extern "C" {
    static PyObject* foo(PyObject* self, PyObject* args);
}

static PyMethodDef myMethods[] = {
    {"foo", foo, METH_VARARGS, "Runs foo"},
    {NULL, NULL, 0, NULL}
}

// Define the module
static struct PyModuleDef myModule = {
    PyModuleDef_HEAD_INIT,
    "myModule",
    "A Module",
    -1,
    myMethods
};

// Initialize the module
PyMODINIT_FUNC PyInit_BSPy(void) {
    return PyModule_Create(&myModule);
}

//Include the function
static PyObject* foo(PyObject* self, PyObject* args){
    // Declare variable/function pointer
    int(*bar)(void);
    unsigned int n;

    // Parse the input tuple
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, ..., &bar, &n)) {
        return NULL;
    }
}

Now, when it comes time to parse the input tuple, I get confused, as I'm not really sure how to parse it. The idea is rather simple: I need to be able to call foo(bar(), n) in python. But I could use some help on how to realize this.

  • 1
    I'm not sure this is reasonably possible. Python doesn't have the same concept of pointers that C does. Can you wrap your Python call in a C function and then pass that C function as a parameter to your foo function? – Robert Harvey Nov 8 at 20:41
  • 1
    Is the signature of the C function that you are trying to wrap exactly int foo(int(*func)(void), int i)? The thing you're trying to do will be much easier if it is really something like int foo(int (*func)(void *data), int i, void *data) where func will be called with whatever you supply as data as its argument. – zwol Nov 8 at 21:13
  • 1
    Aha, an alternative that takes C++ std::function! That makes it doable. I'll write an answer. – zwol Nov 8 at 21:40
  • 1
    Since apparently you are targeting CPython, are you not concerned about its Global Interpreter Lock, which limits the parallelism achievable within a single Python instance? – John Bollinger Nov 8 at 21:41
  • 2
    Given that this is a parallel processing use case, you may need to deal with the interface for calling Python functions from threads not created by Python. – user2357112 Nov 8 at 22:09

The Python callable passed in will be a Python object which matches the Callable protocol. Therefore, in order to pass it to your C function, you'll have to create another C function as a proxy which matches the required signature of your function pointer.

As an example:

static PyObject* foo_cb_callable;
static int py_foo_callback(void) {
    PyObject* retval;
    int result;

    // Call the python function/object saved below
    retval = PyObject_CallObject(foo_cb_callable, NULL);

    // Convert the returned object to an int if possible
    if (retval && PyInt_Check(retval))
        result = (int)PyInt_AsLong(retval);
    else
        result = -1;
    Py_XDECREF(retval);
    return result;
}

// NOTE: I renamed this to avoid conflicting with your "foo"
// function to be called externally.
static PyObject* py_foo(PyObject* self, PyObject* args) {
    unsigned int n;
    int result;

    // Parse the input tuple
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "OI", &foo_cb_callable, &n)) {
        return NULL;
    }
    // Ensure the first parameter is a callable (e.g. function)
    if (!PyCallable_Check(foo_cb_callable)) {
        return NULL;
    }

    // Call foo with our custom wrapper
    result = foo(&py_foo_callback, n);
    return Py_BuildValue("i", result);
}

Note that I used a global callback object pointer in the example, since your original function pointer didn't have a place for custom user data. If you add a generic user parameter to the func callback, the wrap_foo_callback could be passed to it that way instead of making a global variable. For example:

int foo(int(*func)(void*), void* user_data, int i) {
    int n = func(user_data) + i;
    return n;
}

// ...

static int py_foo_callback(void* callback) {
    PyObject* retval;
    int result;

    // Call the python function/object saved below
    retval = PyObject_CallObject((PyObject*)callback, NULL);

    // Convert the returned object to an int if possible
    if (retval && PyInt_Check(retval))
        result = (int)PyInt_AsLong(retval);
    else
        result = -1;
    Py_XDECREF(retval);
    return result;
}

static PyObject* py_foo(PyObject* self, PyObject* args) {
    PyObject* callback;
    unsigned int n;
    int result;

    // Parse the input tuple
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "OI", &callback, &n)) {
        return NULL;
    }
    // Ensure the first parameter is a callable (e.g. function)
    if (!PyCallable_Check(callback)) {
        return NULL;
    }

    // Call foo with our custom wrapper
    result = foo(&py_foo_callback, callback, n);
    return Py_BuildValue("i", result);
}

First off, when you have a Python "extension method", implemented in C, and that function receives a Python callable as an argument, here is how you receive the argument, and how you call the callable:

/* this code uses only C features */
static PyObject *
foo(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    PyObject *cb;    

    // Receive a single argument which can be any Python object
    // note: the object's reference count is NOT increased (but it's pinned by
    // the argument tuple).
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "O", &cb)) {
        return 0;
    }
    // determine whether the object is in fact callable
    if (!PyCallable_Check(cb)) {
        PyErr_SetString(PyExc_TypeError, "foo: a callable is required");
        return 0;
    }
    // call it (no arguments supplied)
    // there are a whole bunch of other PyObject_Call* functions for when you want
    // to supply arguments
    PyObject *rv = PyObject_CallObject(cb, 0);
    // if calling it returned 0, must return 0 to propagate the exception
    if (!rv) return 0;
    // otherwise, discard the object returned and return None
    Py_CLEAR(rv);
    Py_RETURN_NONE;
}

The problem with using logic like this to wrap bsp_init is that the pointer to the Python callable is a data pointer. If you passed that pointer directly to bsp_init, bsp_init would attempt to invoke data as machine code and it would crash. If bsp_init passed through a data pointer to the function that it calls, you could work around this with a "glue" procedure:

/* this code also uses only C features */
struct bsp_init_glue_args {
   PyObject *cb;
   PyObject *rv;
};
static void
bsp_init_glue(void *data)
{
   struct bsp_init_glue_args *args = data;
   args->rv = PyObject_CallObject(args->cb, 0);
}

static PyObject *
foo(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    bsp_init_glue_args ba;
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "O", &ba.cb)) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (!PyCallable_Check(ba.cb)) {
        PyErr_SetString(PyExc_TypeError, "foo: a callable is required");
        return 0;
    }
    bsp_init(bsp_init_glue, (void *)&ba, ...);
    if (ba->rv == 0) return 0;
    Py_CLEAR(ba->rv);
    Py_RETURN_NONE;
}

Unfortunately, bsp_init does not have this signature, so you cannot do this. But the alternative interface BSPLib::Classic::Init takes a std::function<void()>, which is an object-oriented wrapper around the pattern above, so you can do this instead:

/* this code requires C++11 */
static PyObject *
foo(PyObject *self, PyObject *args)
{
    PyObject *cb;
    PyObject *rv = 0;
    if (!PyArg_ParseTuple(args, "O", &cb)) {
        return 0;
    }
    if (!PyCallable_Check(cb)) {
        PyErr_SetString(PyExc_TypeError, "foo: a callable is required");
        return 0;
    }

    std::function<void()> closure = [&]() {
       rv = PyObject_CallObject(cb, 0);
    };
    BSPLib::Classic::Init(closure, ...);

    if (rv == 0) return 0;
    Py_CLEAR(rv);
    Py_RETURN_NONE;
}

The magic here is all in the [&]() { ... } notation, which is syntactic sugar for defining and creating an instance of a local class that "captures" the variables cb and rv so that the code inside the curly braces, which will be compiled as a separate function, can communicate with foo proper. This is a C++11 feature called "lambdas", which is a jargon term going all the way back to the earliest days of theoretical CS and immortalized by Lisp. Here is a tutorial, but I am not sure how good it is because I already know the concept inside and out.

It is not possible to do this in plain C, but it isn't possible to call BSPLib::Classic::Init from plain C either (because you can't define a std::function object at all in plain C ... well, not without reverse engineering the C++ standard library and ABI, anyway) so that's okay.

  • Thanks for this answer! It took me a while to comprehend what was going on, but seems really cool. I'm not able to verify whether it works yet, since I ran in to a bug, but will update and accept once I can! – Mitchell Faas Nov 8 at 22:59

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.