For example:

Cls::Cls(int *p) : m1_(1), m2_(m1), m3_(p), m4_(m3) {}

where Cls::m1_ and Cls::m2_ are of type int and m3 and m4 are of type int*.

Is this legal? If it is legal, does it do what one would expect?

  • 4
    Yes if the member was defined in the class BEFORE the member you are currently trying to initialize. Regardless of the order used in the initializer list, members will be initialized in the order of definition. – user4581301 Nov 8 at 22:44
  • 2
    @ubadub Because C++ is an absurd language and the order the variables are declared in the class is the actual order they are initialized in, not the way you do it in the list – NathanOliver Nov 8 at 22:49
  • 3
    @NathanOliver It's not absurd that members are initialized in declaration order---that is necessary to ensure that they're destroyed in the right order. What's absurd is that it's not a compilation error when you get the order wrong in the ctor-initializer. – Brian Nov 8 at 22:50
  • 2
    Everything that can be initialised is initialised before the body of the constructor is entered. So normally, the body of the constructor should be empty. – Neil Butterworth Nov 8 at 22:53
  • 1
    All of them, even if the initialization is to do nothing. – user4581301 Nov 8 at 22:53

As pointed out in the comments, non-static data members are initialized in declaration order. In order to prevent confusion, you should always write the member initializers in declaration order. In the case presented in the question, I will therefore assume that the order in which the members were declared is:

int m1_;
int m2_;
int* m3_;
int* m4_;

Assuming that is the case, the code is well-defined and does what you expect it to do. This is guaranteed by [intro.execution]/12.3, which guarantees that each member initialization is a full-expression, and [class.base.init]/13.3, which guarantees that these initializations occur in declaration order.

  • What behavior ensures is the variables are out of order? – ubadub Nov 8 at 23:03
  • @ubadub I don't understand your comment at all. Could you elaborate? – Brian Nov 8 at 23:07
  • If the variables in the initializer list are in a different order than in the class definition, what occurs? Sorry, there was a typo in my original comment, I mean *ensues, not ensures. – ubadub Nov 8 at 23:13
  • 1
    @ubadub your compiler should issue a warning and you should fix your code, but if you insist on having the wrong order in your constructor initializer list, then [class.base.init]/13.3 still guarantees that initialization occurs in declaration order. In particular, this means that your code may be incorrect if the declaration order is different from what I have assumed here. – Brian Nov 8 at 23:15

This is legal-ish. If you have

struct foo
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    foo() : a(1), b(a + 1), c(b + 1) {}
};

Then this is fine. The reason is a is declared in the class before b and b is declared before c. All class members are initialized in the order they are declared in the class, so you could even have

struct foo
{
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
    foo() : c(b + 1), b(a + 1), a(1) {}
};

and you would still be okay. If you had

struct foo
{
    int b;
    int c;
    int a;
    foo() : a(1), b(a + 1), c(b + 1) {}
};

on the other hand, both b and c would be initialized with an indeterminate value and using them would be undefined behavior.

Yes, it's legal. The init order follows the order of the members in the class.

struct C
{
    C() : m1_(1), m2_(m1_ + 1), m3_(m2_ + 2), m4_(m3_ + 3) {} 

    int m1_ = 0;
    int m2_ = 0;
    int m3_ = 0;
    int m4_ = 0;
};

int main()
{
    C c;
    std::cout << c.m1_ << std::endl;
    std::cout << c.m2_ << std::endl;
    std::cout << c.m3_ << std::endl;
    std::cout << c.m4_ << std::endl;
}

The output:

1
2
4
7

But if you modified the member orders:

struct C
{
    C() : m1_(1), m2_(m1_ + 1), m3_(m2_ + 2), m4_(m3_ + 3) {} 

    int m2_ = 0;
    int m3_ = 0;
    int m4_ = 0;
    int m1_ = 0;
};

The output will be:

1
1
3
6
  • 3
    There should be a really big if in this answer. If you declare m1_ last in the class this won't work. – NathanOliver Nov 8 at 22:50
  • Yes you are right. The init order follows the order of the members in the class. If you put m1_ last the initialiser will use original value of m1_ when init m2_. – Peter Nov 8 at 22:58
  • I've modified the answer to show that. – Peter Nov 8 at 23:06

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