I have a javascript function functionTwo that saves a function name to a variable fn-name, and then later on, a user clicks a button set to run functionThree, and functionThree needs to run the function that was set in functionTwo. A possible scenario is

I call

functionTwo(fn);

in my code, and functionTwo sets

fn-name = fn;

Then the user clicks a button and

functionThree();

runs. I need to make function three run the function that was saved to fn-name

thanks!

EDIT: I ended up using the window[fnName] method. Thanks for your help!

closed as off-topic by George Jempty, Ry- Nov 10 at 0:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions seeking debugging help ("why isn't this code working?") must include the desired behavior, a specific problem or error and the shortest code necessary to reproduce it in the question itself. Questions without a clear problem statement are not useful to other readers. See: How to create a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example." – Ry-
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  • 5
    You mean fn_name, right? – Ele Nov 8 at 23:35
  • What exactly are you passing in? Are you passing in a function name as a string or the function object itself? – mwilson Nov 8 at 23:35
  • You did that and it didn’t work? – Ry- Nov 8 at 23:36
  • Your example seems to indicate that fn_name holds a function object, not a funtion name. So fn_name() maybe? If that's not the case your example is incomplete. Please provide a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. Potentially a duplicate of “Variable” variables in Javascript? . (and as already pointed out, fn-name is not a valid variable name). – Felix Kling Nov 8 at 23:36
  • Without quotes you aren't really storing the name but the actual function. You can call it by putting () behind the variable. – Chris G Nov 8 at 23:37

First and foremost, if you're expecting fn-name = fn to work as a variable it won't. Minus/dash is an illegal character in variable names. What you have with fn-name is actually subtracting (if they were numbers) name from fn

You could do something like below. Basically, storage your known functions in an array and have the user pass in the string name of the function. Once you have that, you can fetch the correct function from the array and execute it.

Full JS Fiddle: https://jsfiddle.net/mswilson4040/u20efn9z/4/

<button id="fn1">Execute functionOne</button>
<button id="fn2">Execute functionTwo</button>
<button id="fn3">Execute functionThree</button>


const functionStorage = [functionOne, functionTwo, functionThree];

document.getElementById('fn1').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionOne');
});
document.getElementById('fn2').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionTwo');
});
document.getElementById('fn3').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionThree');
});

function executeFunction(name) {
    const fn = functionStorage.find( f => f.name === name);
  if (fn) {
    const result = fn();
    alert(result);
  }
}

function functionOne() {
    return 'From functionOne';
}
function functionTwo() {
    return 'From functionTwo';
}
function functionThree() {
    return 'From functionThree';
}

Or

https://jsfiddle.net/mswilson4040/u20efn9z/9/

const functionObj = {
    functionOne: () => 'From functonOne',
  functionTwo: () => 'From functonTwo',
  functionThree: () => 'From functonThree',
};

document.getElementById('fn1').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionOne');
});
document.getElementById('fn2').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionTwo');
});
document.getElementById('fn3').addEventListener('click', (e) => {
        executeFunction('functionThree');
});

function executeFunction(name) {
    const fn = functionObj[name];
  if (fn) {
    const result = fn();
    alert(result);
  }
}
  • 2
    Or just create a name -> value mapping and access it directly as explained in stackoverflow.com/q/5187530/218196 . It's even easier in ES2015+: const functionStorage = {functionOne, functionTwo, functionThree}; – Felix Kling Nov 8 at 23:44
  • 1
    Yea, that would totally be more efficient. – mwilson Nov 8 at 23:46
  • 1
    Updated answer to show both ways. – mwilson Nov 8 at 23:54

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