Amazon now owns 3.0.0.0/8 Apparently bought in two chunks: 3.0.0.0/9 and 3.128.0.0/9.

How do I write program in Ruby to add 3.0.0.0/9 and 3.128.0.0/9 and get result - 3.0.0.0/8?

I can convert mask to cidr this way:

"255.255.255.0"  \
    .split(".") \
    .map { |e| e.to_i.to_s(2).rjust(8, "0") } \
    .join \
    .count("1") # => 24

But how can I add one mask to another?

This is what I have now:

[1] pry(main)> "3.128.0.0".split('.').map { |e| e.to_i.to_s(2).rjust(8, "0") }
=> ["00000011", "10000000", "00000000", "00000000"]
[2] pry(main)> "3.0.0.0".split('.').map { |e| e.to_i.to_s(2).rjust(8, "0") }
=> ["00000011", "00000000", "00000000", "00000000"]

How do I apply /9 to both of addresses above?

  • It is not as simple as addition. In fact, you must only use masks of the same length, and then it is binary division, but the caveat is that the addresses must then end up on a suitable bit boundary. Part 2 of this answer explains how that works. – Ron Maupin Nov 9 at 12:35

I don't know if I properly get the point, but maybe this can help.

Defining some methods to do calculations:

def ip_to_bin(ip)
  ip.split('.').map { |e| e.to_i.to_s(2).rjust(8, "0").split('').map(&:to_i) }
end

def network(ip, mask)
  # convert string to array of bin
  ip = ip_to_bin(ip)
  mask = ip_to_bin(mask)
  # then bitwise sums
  ip.zip(mask).map { |e| e.first.zip(e.last).map { |s, a| s & a } }.map { |e| e.reverse.map.with_index { |d,i| d.to_i * 2**i }.sum }.join('.')
end

def cidr_to_mask(cidr)
  (cidr.times.map{ 1 } + (32 - cidr).times.map{ 0 }).each_slice(8).map { |e| e.reverse.map.with_index { |d,i| d.to_i * 2**i }.sum }.join('.')
end

Then calculate your network using the methods:

cidr = 8
ip = "3.0.0.0"
mask = cidr_to_mask(cidr) #=> "255.0.0.0"
network(ip, mask) #=> "3.0.0.0"

Another example:

network("176.232.53.237", cidr_to_mask(26)) #=> "176.232.53.192"

To calculate the number of hosts from CIDR:

def nr_hosts_from(cidr)
  ((32-cidr).times.map{ 1 }).reverse.map.with_index { |d,i| d.to_i * 2**i }.sum - 1
end

nr_hosts_from(8) #=> 16777214
nr_hosts_from(9) #=>  8388606

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