I have a table "bucket" containing minimum int values for buckets, like this

min_value bucket_id
--------- ---------
       0      1
   12345      2
   67890      3

i.e. any value >= 0 and < 12345 belongs in bucket 1, ..., any value >= 67890 belongs in bucket 3.

and a table of int values "value" like this:

id value
-- -----
11    10
22 20000
33 80000

I would like to figure out which bucket each value belongs to. So

select id, bucket_id
from (some join, or whatever, of bucket and value)

gives me

id bucket_id
-- ---------
11     1
22     2
33     3

I am trying to implement this in HiveQL. Any ideas?

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I assumed that the condition for the bucket with largest min_value is min_value <= value (since there is no bucket with larger min_value) and I also assumed integer type for column value of table value and column min_value of table bucket (that's important because the query uses comparison which works differently in case of string type so you need to do typecasting for string).

The following query works for non-negative value of table value, in case of negative values involved, you have to replace
max(if(a.value >= b.min_value, b.min_value, 0))
with
max(if(a.value >= b.min_value, b.min_value, <minimum possible value that "value" field may have>)):

select 
c.id, 
if(d.bucket_id is null, 'not in bucket', d.bucket_id)

from
(    
  select     
  a.id,
  max(if(a.value >= b.min_value, b.min_value, 0)) as bucket_min_value    
  from    
  value a    
  left join     
  bucket b    
  group by a.id    
)    
c

left join    
bucket d    
on c.bucket_min_value = d.min_value    
;
  • Yes, ints. I've added that to the question. Thanks. – battey Nov 9 at 4:28

You can use window functions to define ranges for the bucket ids and then join the bucket table. Check this out.

> select * from bucket;
+-------------------+-------------------+--+
| bucket.min_value  | bucket.bucket_id  |
+-------------------+-------------------+--+
| 0                 | 1                 |
| 12345             | 2                 |
| 67890             | 3                 |
+-------------------+-------------------+--+

> select * from buckvalue;
+---------------+------------------+--+
| buckvalue.id  | buckvalue.value  |
+---------------+------------------+--+
| 11            | 10               |
| 22            | 20000            |
| 33            | 80000            |
+---------------+------------------+--+

> select bucket_id, min_value, lead(min_value) over(order by bucket_id)  as max1 from bucket;
INFO  : OK
+------------+------------+--------+--+
| bucket_id  | min_value  |  max1  |
+------------+------------+--------+--+
| 1          | 0          | 12345  |
| 2          | 12345      | 67890  |
| 3          | 67890      | NULL   |
+------------+------------+--------+--+

> select t1.id, t1.value, t2.bucket_id from buckvalue t1 left outer join ( select bucket_id, min_value, lead(min_value) over(order by bucket_id)  as max1 from bucket ) t2
where t1.value >= t2.min_value and t1.value < coalesce(t2.max1,99999);

+--------+-----------+---------------+--+
| t1.id  | t1.value  | t2.bucket_id  |
+--------+-----------+---------------+--+
| 11     | 10        | 1             |
| 22     | 20000     | 2             |
| 33     | 80000     | 3             |
+--------+-----------+---------------+--+

I found a really simple query to do this. It works by finding all the bucket numbers for which the value is greater than the bucket's minimum value, and taking the maximum bucket_id.

create temporary table bucket as select * from (select 0 min_value, 1 bucket_id union select 12345, 2 union select 67890, 3) a;
create temporary table value as select * from (select 11 id, 10 value union select 22, 20000 union select 33, 80000) a;

select value.id, max(bucket.bucket_id) bucket_id
from value
join bucket
where value.value > bucket.min_value
group by value.id;
  • what is the hive version that is used? – stack0114106 Nov 9 at 8:38
  • Hive 1.2, MapR distribution: Hive 1.2.0-mapr-json-1710 Subversion git://35e44e05a8a9/root/opensource/mapr-hive-1.2/dl/mapr-hive-1.2 -r ff9272d8f9dd859ac982bb32d0e3dc5acd7ead4f Compiled by root on Mon Oct 30 18:19:56 UTC 2017 From source with checksum 07ae5487de4e08bffbf15ebbd119411a – battey Nov 9 at 15:33
  • well, for your case it works because the larger bucket minvalue implies the larger bucket ID, otherwise the query is wrong. consider buckets {"minvalue:0, id:1", "minvalue:67890, id:2", "minvalue:12345, id:3"} or {"minvalue:67890, id:1", "minvalue:12345, id:2", "minvalue:0, id:3"} or {"minvalue:12345, id:1", "minvalue:0, id:2", "minvalue:67890, id:3"} – mangusta Nov 10 at 11:42
  • even for your case it is wrong since you use ">" instead of ">=" in "where value.value > bucket.min_value", so the elements equal to bucket minvalues will be assigned to wrong buckets. the correct version is in both the answers given. I would give a credit to the answer of user "stack0114106" since he used a compact way of "lead() over()" to avoid double join and double select – mangusta Nov 10 at 12:14
  • @mangusta..thanks for your critical review and insights! – stack0114106 yesterday

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